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Planer/molder owners. Some molding knife questions for you.

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Forum topic by boardmaker posted 04-29-2011 07:10 PM 5204 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boardmaker

35 posts in 2101 days


04-29-2011 07:10 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer milling woodmaster belsaw molder moulder knives knife profile

For those of you that use the Woodmaster, Belsaw, Craftsman, Powermatic or Jet type molders, I have a few questions. I have both a Woodmaster 718, and a Belsaw 910, I’ve ran both as molders a fair amount. So I have a little experience with them.
I generallly just use the Belsaw for planing now. The Woodmaster is on it’s way to becoming a dedicated molder. All the molding I have ran were with single knives in the planer head. For the most part I am pretty happy with my results. A little more background on the molder. I generally run the Woodmaster around 60%. Approximately 9ft/min. I have a melamine bedboard with T-tracks that hold adjustable wood rails. I have also done the motor on a hinge and single powertwist V-belt. I also beefed up the extension wings.
I don’t really notice any chatter so I’m happy with that. When I run Poplar, sometimes I get light tearout. Then, I have to slow my speed down, but then I start to burn on the sides which leads to my questions.

When you guys run a casing knife that has a square form like a fluted casing knife, do you profile 3 sides with one knife or do you have your molding blank ripped exactly to size an only mold the top?

Some of the knives that I have currently have the profile and a wing on each side. So I rip a blank on the straight line rip saw at work about a 1/16th over. The problem is sometimes I get burning on the side of the molding. Obviously, I believe the knife is dulling, but the top profile is still in great shape. So I am considering knives that only profile one side instead of all 3. When you profile 3 sides at a time, I seem to get nice roundover edges. I think one edge profiling will not give those edges. I do run the molding through a mop sander, but I don’t believe it will round the edges quite like I want. With one sided profiling, you must have the blank exactly centered with the knife, but with three side profiling you can be off slightly.

I am also seriously considering buying the Woodmaster 2 knife corrugated head. I know that will help some. Most of my knives are from woodmaster, and I’m pretty happy with them. I just am trying to keep from dulling the sides before the top is dull.

Enough rambling. I’m just wondering what you guys do, and if any of you have the same thoughts.
BTW, this post may look familiar to some of you.


3 replies so far

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2387 posts in 3011 days


#1 posted 06-13-2011 06:32 AM

Hey boardmaker, doesnt look to b much wisdom with regard to your question. I just bought our first 725. I dont even have it wired up yet. The 725 is replacing a 15” jet that is 3 hp and that planer is simply a workhorse that i planed a ton of glue ups. So you may be the go to person about using the woodmaster. I am excited. I bought 10/3 wire with a 40 amp breaker but i have since found that is under sized so i have not yet wired it up. I thimk i am going to go with a 50 amp breaker and 8/3 wire. And what do you think about the woodmaster compared to the belsaw. I bet the belsaw is a great planer. I plan to someday add another planer, an older model tank like an oliver. I like the idea of having dedicated machines to minimize set up times but for now the woodmaster will have to be used for gang rip, molding and planing. Well any input you could give me about your exp would be great. Thanks, Jerry

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boardmaker

35 posts in 2101 days


#2 posted 06-14-2011 07:37 PM

Jerry,
I’ve made a few conclusions since that post. Some may agree with me and some may not.
First, I would love to have the 2 knife molding head, but I have not purchased it yet. Someday I will own it.
I just haven’t ran enough of one single profile to justify 2 knives although I would like to get a side business going making molding so I see it in my future. But, right now single flat back knives do just fine.
Second, those sides of the molding knives are called parting legs. I am phasing those knives out. I will only be molding one side at a time. I’ve had no luck with them, and after a few phone calls, most agree with me.
I must say that I love my Woodmaster.

For all you guys that own one, with sharp saw blades when ripping molding blanks to size, do you have to sand out a lot of saw marks or does it come out fairly smooth. I have not used the saw portion of this machine yet, but I do have 4 blades I may send off to get sharpened, and then try it.

As far as the Belsaw, I love it. It’s the reason I bought the Woodmaster. Get yours wired up and let us know what you think.
One mod you will definitely want to do is the hood/hinge mod. Search woodweb or search woodmaster blogspot in google. A guy by the name of Justin has a blog that he details it on. Those hoods are just too heavy to lug on and off, and I’m a pretty big guy. It just gets old.

Report back.
Lucas

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2387 posts in 3011 days


#3 posted 06-15-2011 02:04 AM

Thanks Lucas for the imput. I just bought 8/2 wire with a ground today so it will b wired soon enough. I also bought my first custom knife today which is a 1/2 round flute that is 2 1/2” knife, it is a molding i use for our visible cabinet corners to dress things up some. I also want to start running cuatom molding for customers so i will begin to market for custom molding soon. I would also like to buy the 2 knife cutter head soon. Well we will b making some shavings soon.

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