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Forum topic by bill66 posted 03-14-2018 12:04 PM 543 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bill66

6 posts in 468 days


03-14-2018 12:04 PM

I purchased a considerable amount of tools as I entered retirement and for the most part well satisfied. There is a lot of Festool, bandsaw, router table, small jointer, etc. The one item I am second guessing is the Jobsite Sawstop. My space is small so I opted for the Sawstop Jobsite snce I have the track saw and Kapex miter saw. Is it possible to do good woodworking with this saw. My skill level is very low at this point but I do want to not be at a disadvantage going forward. What are the limitations and possible work around? Perhaps the saw is ok. I would love to hear a few opinions from the experienced members. Thank you.


14 replies so far

View TarHeelz's profile

TarHeelz

59 posts in 2103 days


#1 posted 03-14-2018 12:21 PM

Aren’t you the person who answers this question for the person who has not yet purchased and used this saw?

Are your cuts accurate? Is the saw powerful enough for you to push wood through without it bogging down?

-- Tar Heelz, Durham, NC USA

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1234 posts in 2017 days


#2 posted 03-14-2018 12:25 PM

My brother has the folding jobsite saw. It is really the nicest saw I have seen I that class. The main drawback is weight. With the folding stand it doesn’t have much mass, so as you push deep cuts across it it can move or vibrate. The work around is to take shallower passes. You can also load up the base with sandbags when in use to add weight, or take it off the stand to build it in to a work table that can serve as your work bench and outfeed table at the same time.

You will get advice that you can’t do good wood working with that saw, but those people are wrong. Yes, you will have to alter your work of practices to fit the limitations of the machine, but the truth is that is true no matter what machine you have. And yes, if you went and bought a 3hp PCS you wouild notice the difference, but both will work.

I made about half the stuff in my projects list with a Ridgid folding jobsite saw that many on the internet said was not suitable for wood working. And your sawstop is a lot nicer than that. Just go learn how to make what you want to make on the saw you have. You can do it.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View bill66's profile

bill66

6 posts in 468 days


#3 posted 03-14-2018 01:05 PM

Brian. Thank you for the response. I have only cut a few thin boards and was not sure of the capacity for other situations including a cross cut sled and jigs. If the consensus was on the negative I would have considered trading up in size.

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bill66

6 posts in 468 days


#4 posted 03-14-2018 01:13 PM

Tarhelz

Thanks for answeing. Perhaps I can be of more help to others after I have used the equipment for more than a couple of thin rips. If the responses had been negative I would consider trading up in size of the saw. My questioning came from looking at others using larger saws on line not from my personal operations at this point. This was my first post and I am green at woodworking. I appreciate all the help and patience available at this point in the process.

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bill66

6 posts in 468 days


#5 posted 03-14-2018 01:29 PM

Brian. Thank you for the response. I have only cut a few thin boards and was not sure of the capacity for other situations including a cross cut sled and jigs. If the consensus was on the negative I would have considered trading up in size.

View Steve's profile

Steve

419 posts in 605 days


#6 posted 03-14-2018 01:32 PM

I think you should use the saw to build the things you want and when you realize that you can’t build something due to the limits of the saw, then evaluate whether you can adapt the saw to make it work or sell it and upgrade.

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

57 posts in 1071 days


#7 posted 03-14-2018 01:48 PM

I worked for years using a Bosch folding saw and did some great work. After I retired, I was fortunate enough to be able to set up a three car garage dedicated to wood/metal working. I purchased a 3hp PCS with the industrial base that allows me to rearrange the shop layout as needed. It’s a great saw.
As mentioned, you will not have as stable a base for cutting long/heavy boards as you would with the cabinet saw. But you can do some amazing work with the contractor’s saw. It really comes down to budget and available space. The saw stop safety features make it a no-brainier for me. Buy what fits your budget and space and get to making some sawdust! You can always upgrade if your skills/interest demand a PCS.

Good Luck

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View garageking's profile

garageking

32 posts in 473 days


#8 posted 03-14-2018 03:46 PM

I have used a not generally well regarded Ryobi BT3000 contractor saw for 25 years. The saw is tuned and has a Forrest WW2 blade on it. I really like it. I have made a lot of furniture using it and keep thinking of upgrading but then changing my mind. I have looked at the Sawstop jobsite saw at Woodcraft and it is clearly a much better saw than my old Ryobi. It is a very well thought out saw. I have been woodworking for almost 50 years and don’t upgrade any hand or power tools unless there is a really good reason. My opinion is that you have a great saw so start building. Sure if you reach a point where you feel limited by the machine, you can always upgrade. A track saw and a sliding compound miter saw will allow you to get by with a small lightweight table saw as well.

-- David, Kentucky

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 117 days


#9 posted 03-14-2018 04:19 PM

As has been pointed out many times on the forum, a folding contractor saw doesn’t have a significantly smaller footprint than a 36” cabinet saw with a mobile base. If size is your main concern and not money, I’d look at picking up a PCS and a mobile base, and rearranging a corner of your workspace so that it can roll up underneath a cabinet or something to get out of the way.

While not in use you can just pull the fence off, set it to the side, lay a piece of plywood on it and use it as extra workbench space too.

It’s much easier to keep a cabinet saw set up and running straight than it is a contractor saw on a folding base, no matter who makes the saw.

View bill66's profile

bill66

6 posts in 468 days


#10 posted 03-14-2018 04:54 PM

A lot of great points on the Sawstop Jobsite. Thanks to everyone! I will stay with this saw as I learn and grow in woodworking. I especially liked the comments of success from long time woodworkers using similar equipment. No doubt it is the skill a lot more than equipment.

View bill66's profile

bill66

6 posts in 468 days


#11 posted 03-14-2018 04:54 PM

A lot of great points on the Sawstop Jobsite. Thanks to everyone! I will stay with this saw as I learn and grow in woodworking. I especially liked the comments of success from long time woodworkers using similar equipment. No doubt it is the skill a lot more than equipment.

View gargey's profile

gargey

995 posts in 798 days


#12 posted 03-14-2018 05:12 PM

It is possible to do great work without a table saw…

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 117 days


#13 posted 03-14-2018 06:16 PM



It is possible to do great work without a table saw…

- gargey

It’s also possible to cross the Ghobi desert on foot.

But do you want to?

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8055 posts in 3398 days


#14 posted 03-14-2018 06:28 PM

In addition to being light weight, one of the biggest drawbacks of any small saw is the short distance between the front edge of the table and the blade. That “landing zone” is the space you have to work with to the get the board settled, flush with the table, and firmly against the fence before it contacts the blade. Full size saws have a considerably larger landing zone, making it easier to get the work piece settled, so it’s easier to get accurate results. The extra distance in front of the blade also makes the larger saws safer, but that’s more of a moot point with the Saw Stop.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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