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Voids and cracks epoxy???

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Forum topic by Pizzadave posted 03-14-2018 03:11 AM 551 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Pizzadave

49 posts in 199 days


03-14-2018 03:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: epoxy filler dryrot oak

Hey gang!! I have a beautiful slab of oak that I want to make into a bench. Unfortunately it has some dry rot in a couple of places. A simple filler won’t do it. I was wondering about some different, more suitable solutions for larger cracks, voids and rot. I do have some experience with butterfly joints but I was more looking towards a pourable method. I was looking into epoxy. I use it for table finishes and the like. Would I use the same epoxy for the cracks? Do I use a different one? After pouring(also taping the bottom of the crack) can I sand it and then pour a top coat? Thank you!!

-- Dave, New York


17 replies so far

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John Smith

1308 posts in 279 days


#1 posted 03-14-2018 04:01 PM

Dave – there are a few existing projects like this.
first of all – you must have very dry and fully cured wood for satisfactory results.
photos of your project would help the gallery help you.
this is a project from last week – lots of good information there.
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/266297

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Pizzadave

49 posts in 199 days


#2 posted 03-14-2018 04:42 PM

Thanks a million John!

-- Dave, New York

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Andybb

1225 posts in 720 days


#3 posted 03-14-2018 05:44 PM

Dave, I would tape (packing tape) the top and pour from the back. Make sure the tape is is resting flush on a flat surface when you turn it over. 1st pour is minimal just to seal the top. (too much creates a lot of heat and causes problems like melted tape and visible bubbles) Wait a few hours for it to cure a little and it will be flush. Then pour the rest in stages. I use Total Boat but West System and others are popular also.

I’d use a Dremel to remove some of the dry rot in the cracks. I’ve also had success with penetrating epoxy for surface rot.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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DS

2978 posts in 2537 days


#4 posted 03-14-2018 06:13 PM

Dave, I’ve seen some folks get real creative with this issue.

Fill all but the top portion of the defect in a first pour, then go back with an accent material like crushed turquoise mixed in and top it off with a second pour.
After sanding flat you have a beautiful accent on the defect area.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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John Smith

1308 posts in 279 days


#5 posted 03-14-2018 06:20 PM

another trick – to ensure the epoxy reaches deep down in the crevices,
put your shop-vac at the tight end to suck the resin down deep.

again – photos of your project will help with more accurate responses.

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.

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-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Pizzadave

49 posts in 199 days


#6 posted 03-14-2018 06:37 PM

Thanks everyone for your thoughts and ideas. Very helpful indeed. I will send in some pics later today for a visual. Have a good day!!

-- Dave, New York

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Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#7 posted 03-14-2018 06:38 PM

Andy – I’ve moved on from packing tape. I used it for a while because it came off cleanly without sticking to the epoxy, but I found it’s too stiff and unless the surface is really smooth you can’t get a good seal and epoxy just leaks down and forms a puddle trapped by the tape. I had some 3M stucco tape laying around and gave it a try with excellent results. Super flexible and really sticky. By using a stiff brush I was able to press it firmly into the wood texture, even along live edges where there was a lot of contour.

John Smith – Please tell me that was a joke. A good epoxy will flow on its own just fine. Actually, the difficult part is containing it. I’ve never had it not flow completely through. But a shop vac? Come on. You’ve outdone yourself.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Pizzadave

49 posts in 199 days


#8 posted 03-14-2018 11:11 PM

I have used total boat epoxy on my slabs. It’s beautiful. Can I use that epoxy for the filling? Then use hat epoxy for the topcoat?

-- Dave, New York

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Andybb

1225 posts in 720 days


#9 posted 03-15-2018 12:58 AM



I have used total boat epoxy on my slabs. It’s beautiful. Can I use that epoxy for the filling? Then use hat epoxy for the topcoat?

- Pizzadave

Yes. Absolutely.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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John Smith

1308 posts in 279 days


#10 posted 03-15-2018 01:18 AM

I mentioned the shop-vac because I have used it before
to “encourage” epoxy to get into very tight cracks that
it may not flow into on its own accord. will it hurt anything
or cause unsatisfactory results ?? what would be the downside ?
I am not the originator of this technique. I have read about it before
I used it. I think the Wood Whisperer, Wooden Boat, or here on LJ have used it too.
but it does work. https://youtu.be/iaIW798vO3Q
I don’t mean to keep the vac on the crack for 5 minutes or longer.
just a short vacuum of maybe a few seconds to encourage the flow.
I bet other members here have either heard of it or used it themselves.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#11 posted 03-15-2018 01:40 AM

Well, John, I do use my VACMaster VP215 to draw the bubbles out of my epoxy before I pour, so maybe sucking it into place with a shop vac isn’t so far fetched after all.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Pizzadave

49 posts in 199 days


#12 posted 03-15-2018 01:46 AM

Thanks Andy. I guess I’ll give it a whirl. Never used the slabs with rot before. This will be a new adventure. I love adventures. I’m a beginner and if I was a professional I would be humble and say I’m a beginner. Thanks for all the honest replies.
As a matter of fact, I’m pretty sure I have some cut offs and some “too small” slabs that have some rot. I guess that would be a good place for the experiment. I hope everyone has a terrific evening!!

-- Dave, New York

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John Smith

1308 posts in 279 days


#13 posted 03-15-2018 01:46 AM

Rich – is that an apology ?

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Rich

3527 posts in 706 days


#14 posted 03-15-2018 02:02 AM


Rich – is that an apology ?

- John Smith

An apology? For what? Telling you that you’d outdone yourself? That’s the ultimate compliment.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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John Smith

1308 posts in 279 days


#15 posted 03-15-2018 02:18 AM

well – the before post:
John Smith – Please tell me that was a joke. A good epoxy will flow on its own just fine. Actually, the difficult part is containing it. I’ve never had it not flow completely through. But a shop vac? Come on. You’ve outdone yourself.
~ does not sound complimentary.

no, it was not a joke – - – - never mind – I will take it as a compliment and lets move along to the
young mans issue at hand – so he can have accurate information to fix his problem.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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