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Forum topic by OnTheFence posted 03-13-2018 09:26 PM 692 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OnTheFence

6 posts in 826 days


03-13-2018 09:26 PM

Thanks for the replies.


14 replies so far

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MrUnix

6845 posts in 2279 days


#1 posted 03-13-2018 09:42 PM

If you believe it’s a mechanical problem and you aren’t prepared to deal with it yourself, then I’d send it in. They will most likely completely re-hab it for you and it would be like a new head when you get it back. Before that I would try a few other things though. What type of feed rollers does it have? A good cleaning may be in order. Also, is the bed clean and waxed? Seems like 9 out of 10 problems people have with feed, it gets fixed with a good application of paste wax on the bed to keep things moving.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Loren

10477 posts in 3728 days


#2 posted 03-13-2018 09:44 PM

I don’t know how well they work, but Craftsman
“Alien” planers are compact. They can be
found pretty cheap.

Getting rid of the jointer and getting a small
combo machine would be another option.

Belsaw and/or Woodmaster/RBI made some
8” planers. The footprint isn’t much smaller
than a 12” Belsaw though.

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OnTheFence

6 posts in 826 days


#3 posted 03-13-2018 10:23 PM



I don t know how well they work, but Craftsman
“Alien” planers are compact. They can be
found pretty cheap.

Oh, cool, never heard of these. I watched a youtube clip of a restored Alien and they don’t have feed rollers! I don’t think I could do 100s of boards without feed rollers. Great suggestion though, thank you! Side note: did planers not have feed rollers back whenever the alien was made? How did they manage if so?

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bilyo

275 posts in 1183 days


#4 posted 03-13-2018 10:56 PM

Mechanical issues aside, I suggest that you check your methods. It is not unusual for reclaimed lumber to vary significantly in thickness or to have high spots or even significant warps. Unless you have the cutting head adjusted high enough for your initial cuts, the wood could be hanging up on the metal valance on the infeed side of the cutter head. This valance is there to prevent setting the head for a cut that is too deep. When dealing with crooked and reclaimed lumber, it is best to set the cutter head initially very shallow to just skip the high pots and then take further shallow cuts from there.

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eflanders

305 posts in 1931 days


#5 posted 03-13-2018 11:18 PM

The previous poster bilyo has it right. I’ve literally milled miles of reclaimed lumber in both lunchbox and full sized planers. Very light passes are absolutely needed to get the stock to feed consistently. Even rough sawn lumber has enough variance in it to cause issues to feed. Patience, patience, patience! I’ve also learned that carbide cutters are by far the most economical way to work reclaimed wood. In fact my old Steel City (now Cutech) lunch box planer handled reclaimed wood very well which I attribute mostly to the carbide insert cutters.

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OnTheFence

6 posts in 826 days


#6 posted 03-13-2018 11:25 PM



Mechanical issues aside, I suggest that you check your methods. It is not unusual for reclaimed lumber to vary significantly in thickness or to have high spots or even significant warps. Unless you have the cutting head adjusted high enough for your initial cuts, the wood could be hanging up on the metal valance on the infeed side of the cutter head. This valance is there to prevent setting the head for a cut that is too deep. When dealing with crooked and reclaimed lumber, it is best to set the cutter head initially very shallow to just skip the high pots and then take further shallow cuts from there.

- bilyo


I don’t use boards that are too warped or cupped. I run them through the jointer, and then the planer making multiple shallow passes less than 1/16th”

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OnTheFence

6 posts in 826 days


#7 posted 03-13-2018 11:29 PM



The previous poster bilyo has it right. I ve literally milled miles of reclaimed lumber in both lunchbox and full sized planers. Very light passes are absolutely needed to get the stock to feed consistently. Even rough sawn lumber has enough variance in it to cause issues to feed. Patience, patience, patience! I ve also learned that carbide cutters are by far the most economical way to work reclaimed wood. In fact my old Steel City (now Cutech) lunch box planer handled reclaimed wood very well which I attribute mostly to the carbide insert cutters.

- eflanders

Wouldn’t the carbide chip easier? I mean I remove all metal, but still there can be small rocks jammed in the board, or even a knot could poke a hole in a carbide blade pretty easily. At least, thats been my experience.

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bilyo

275 posts in 1183 days


#8 posted 03-14-2018 03:33 AM



I don t use boards that are too warped or cupped. I run them through the jointer, and then the planer making multiple shallow passes less than 1/16th”

- OnTheFence

Even though you are jointing the first side, you are left with a rough uneven surface on the other side that your planer rollers must navigate and the overall thickness might change significantly from place to place along the board. I have had instances where I had to gently push a board partway through until the rollers would catch and drive it the rest of the way. Your first pass or two should be so shallow that you cut only the high points and you may have to push/pull the board through. If you are cautious, you will sometimes miss the setting and not cut anything on the first pass. That’s OK. Lower the cutter a 32nd and make another pass.

The fact that you are having the same problem with more than one planer indicates to me that the planer shouldn’t be blamed. Something in your technique needs to be adjusted.

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OnTheFence

6 posts in 826 days


#9 posted 03-14-2018 03:57 AM


The fact that you are having the same problem with more than one planer indicates to me that the planer shouldn t be blamed. Something in your technique needs to be adjusted.

- bilyo

I probably should have mentioned that the W&H did not have the feed roller issue. I edited the post to clarify.
With the lunchbox planers the feed rollers marking the boards only happened after it had been through the planer a few times and there were no higher peaks on the board. I know because I check the board after each pass and measure with a digital caliper.

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Rich

3335 posts in 670 days


#10 posted 03-14-2018 04:56 AM

The comments by billyo and eflanders are dead on. What happens is you use some method to set the cutter for the first pass, probably on the end of the board. It doesn’t take more than maybe 3/32nd of an inch extra thickness somewhere along the board for it to be too thick to pass into the cutter. At that point the rollers will simply keep turning and leave black marks on the board. The fix is to crank the head up and get the board out of there.

When I’m working on boards that rough and irregular, I try to measure using calipers at several points along the board. Even then, I start with the cutter head high. Sometimes I have to push the board through by hand and it only gets fed by the rollers for a few inches. Eventually though, you’ll start getting cuts the full length.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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William Shelley

576 posts in 1550 days


#11 posted 03-14-2018 07:59 AM

If you upgrade from a lunchbox to more of an industrial style planer, be aware that many/most of them have knurled steel rollers on both the infeed and the outfeed.

I have a Baileigh 16” jointer/planer combo machine. It has a 5.5HP 3-phase motor to drive the cutterhead and I could probably take a 1/4” off a board at once if I really wanted to, but that power comes with a cost … the machine doesn’t really do soft woods or light cuts very well. I was trying to run some cedar through the planer yesterday and ended up with tiny indentations from the outfeed roller. I’m just hoping it sands out.

Also, WAX THE PLANER BED. It’s necessary to keep cast iron surfaces waxed to reduce friction. My boards were sticking until I did this.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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Craftsman on the lake

2799 posts in 3518 days


#12 posted 03-14-2018 09:52 AM

Gee. My Dewalt 734 has taken a beating. You’ve got to take small bites and if you don’t it will groan under the stress but it’s an amazing machine considering what I’ve put it through. It only makes marks on the board if the knives need changing or if I try to take too much off at a time. And as someone mentioned, simonize the bed if cast iron or sheet metal. It helps. Mine’s about 8 years old and a few double sided blade changes along with a few thousand feet of lumber that I almost always purchased, less expensively, unplaned and to it myself. These lunch box planers work great.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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TheFridge

9850 posts in 1566 days


#13 posted 03-14-2018 01:55 PM

Ever waxed the beds? It’s like magic.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Woodknack

12215 posts in 2460 days


#14 posted 03-14-2018 02:58 PM

I’ve had the same problem bilyo describes with a bunch of red cedar that was milled poorly and tapered in varying directions. On my old planer, if I hit a low spot and the feed stalls the board will vibrate and get chewed up. Hitting a high spot tends to leave a snipe. What about using a drum sander to clean up the gnarly side before planing.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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