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Forum topic by TimInIndiana posted 03-10-2018 03:14 PM 522 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TimInIndiana

100 posts in 260 days


03-10-2018 03:14 PM

Some table saws have T-style miter slots and others have flat miter slots (please pardon me if I’m not using the correct terms here!). What are the advantages of one of the other? I would imagine that T slots make it more difficult to use after-market accessories.


10 replies so far

View Sunstealer73's profile

Sunstealer73

169 posts in 2213 days


#1 posted 03-10-2018 03:29 PM

Even with the t-slots, you can still use accessories for regular ones. The advantage is that if you need to use for example your miter gauge to crosscut a wide panel, you can start it off the table and the t-slot will keep in place for you.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4931 posts in 2472 days


#2 posted 03-10-2018 03:49 PM

It makes no difference, you can use the t-slots or not.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

670 posts in 660 days


#3 posted 03-10-2018 03:54 PM

The t-slot holds the miter gauge in place while you are getting the cut started or cross cutting a very wide piece.

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2253 posts in 1343 days


#4 posted 03-11-2018 02:33 PM

T-slots are more of safety feature, but generally standard on larger saws. They should not interfere with accessories and actually provide a way for stuff to clamp down to the table surface.
T-slot miter gauges will cause problems when you forget to cut wide enough slots into your out feed table 8^)

View AxkMan's profile

AxkMan

65 posts in 247 days


#5 posted 03-13-2018 12:03 AM

Keep in mind T-slots are useful if you want to make a tablesaw sled. If you have two T-Slots that is. Most tablesaws should come with two with one on either side. Your width usually makes most of the difference being the length of boards you will be crosscutting.

For a tablesaw sled you buy 2 rails from the manufacturer and attach to the bottom of your sled. Very useful for accurate crosscuts on tablesaws. Without the rails, really too much of a hassle for a sled.

Of course I don’t use tablesaws for crosscuts that much. I mainly use tablesaws for ripping. I prefer to use the Miter Compound Saw for crosscuts more than a tablesaw. More accurate when used with a precision blade on it and almost flawless. The only drawback is in wider boards beyond the allowed limit.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3548 posts in 710 days


#6 posted 03-13-2018 12:34 AM


Of course I don t use tablesaws for crosscuts that much. I mainly use tablesaws for ripping. I prefer to use the Miter Compound Saw for crosscuts more than a tablesaw. More accurate when used with a precision blade on it and almost flawless. The only drawback is in wider boards beyond the allowed limit.

- AxkMan

If you do cabinet work, a crosscut sled with at least a 28” capacity is pretty handy to have.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5545 posts in 2529 days


#7 posted 03-13-2018 03:49 AM


If you do cabinet work, a crosscut sled with at least a 28” capacity is pretty handy to have.

- Rich

I want to make one, and just as soon as I figure out where I will store it I plan on making one. Frankly if I had it to do all over again I would buy 3 acres of land, a single wide trailer and build a 10,000 sq ft shop. This way the space issue would have never been a problem. Oh and skipped getting married to the 1st wife…..

ROFL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3548 posts in 710 days


#8 posted 03-13-2018 04:39 AM

I want to make one, and just as soon as I figure out where I will store it I plan on making one. Frankly if I had it to do all over again I would buy 3 acres of land, a single wide trailer and build a 10,000 sq ft shop. This way the space issue would have never been a problem. Oh and skipped getting married to the 1st wife…..

ROFL

- woodbutcherbynight

They’re flat, so you’ll only need maybe 5000 sq ft. My dream here in AZ is a triple-wide on 100 acres in Avra Valley with a berm to shoot into from 25, 50 and 100 yds, and a double-wide for my shop. I’d go for some horses, but I’ve had too many sad times losing them.

Just a first wife? You’re a lucky guy.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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woodbutcherbynight

5545 posts in 2529 days


#9 posted 03-13-2018 05:20 AM

I learned a few things from first failure. This is much better to come home to every night!

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2073 posts in 3064 days


#10 posted 03-13-2018 05:45 AM

A T slot can be used for certain clamping devices. The washer pulls up against the iron and locks the jig or what have you in place.

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