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Wood Choice For Horse Trailer Tack Room

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Forum topic by cowboyup3371 posted 03-09-2018 12:18 PM 1317 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cowboyup3371

59 posts in 403 days


03-09-2018 12:18 PM

I want to build a new Tack Cabinet for my horse trailer that will replace one I started on but never finished several years ago. Because it’s going to be indirectly exposed to the elements, I have been told I can use white oak but I wondered what other options I have. Has anyone built a project for an RV, Travel, or other type of trailer and what did you use?

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way


9 replies so far

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bondogaposis

5098 posts in 2557 days


#1 posted 03-09-2018 01:52 PM

I would look to any of the boat building woods such as teak or mahogany or even marine plywood.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 300 days


#2 posted 03-09-2018 06:33 PM

Though it’s probably going to be hard to find it in sizes that aren’t pre-milled, I’d recommend Ipe, Tiger-wood , Cumaru, or any of the other tropical woods that have recently become popular for use on outdoor decks.

Installers typically offer a 10 year warranty for the stuff un-sealed or treated, it’s naturally resistant to pretty much everything pest and microbe wise, and doesn’t seem to warp badly in rough weather conditions.

The prices have become pretty reasonable on a lot of them because of the fact that they’re suddenly popular for construction purposes, so poke around and see what you can find.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1422 posts in 1935 days


#3 posted 03-09-2018 07:00 PM

I have a friend that has a business repairing any type trailer imaginable. Horse trailers are 90% of his business. The flooring he uses is mostly clear Doug Fir. It’s put down, and over that if the customer requests, he lays a rubber floor mat to cover the wood. That’s the way it’s done in Tucson…........ Jerry (in Tucson).

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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Loren

10477 posts in 3853 days


#4 posted 03-09-2018 07:21 PM

As long as it doesn’t have water hitting it
and pooling on it a lot of woods will hold
up well outdoors. Paint is the by far the
easiest exterior finish to maintain. It will
also hinder moisture exchange which when
it happens frequently and quickly with
unfinished wood causes surface checking.

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cowboyup3371

59 posts in 403 days


#5 posted 03-09-2018 11:05 PM



I have a friend that has a business repairing any type trailer imaginable. Horse trailers are 90% of his business. The flooring he uses is mostly clear Doug Fir. It s put down, and over that if the customer requests, he lays a rubber floor mat to cover the wood. That s the way it s done in Tucson…........ Jerry (in Tucson).

- Nubsnstubs

Thank you sir but I have had the plywood flooring down for several years; I’m more interested in building a new tack cabinet that will house my bridles and such

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

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cowboyup3371

59 posts in 403 days


#6 posted 03-09-2018 11:05 PM



As long as it doesn t have water hitting it
and pooling on it a lot of woods will hold
up well outdoors. Paint is the by far the
easiest exterior finish to maintain. It will
also hinder moisture exchange which when
it happens frequently and quickly with
unfinished wood causes surface checking.

- Loren

Thank you Loren; so you would suggest more of a paint than a stain?

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

View Mario's profile

Mario

182 posts in 3602 days


#7 posted 03-09-2018 11:23 PM

Teak, hands down if it is going to be directly exposed to the elements.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3853 days


#8 posted 03-10-2018 12:09 AM

Stain won’t do much as a moisture barrier.
Varnish and other film finishes tend to degrade
outdoors and you have to scrape the finish
off and refinish every several years. It
varies with sun and moisture expose. With
paint you can just knock off the loose bits
and put a fresh coat on.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1869 posts in 3648 days


#9 posted 03-10-2018 12:33 AM

If you have access to cedar (preferably Western Red Cedar) I would consider that and coat it with linseed oil diluted 50% with thinner. Cedar is easy to work with, rot resistant, light weight, bug resistant, and attractive.

-- Les B, Oregon

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