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Exterior door weatherproofing

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Forum topic by Mark Shultz posted 03-08-2018 11:02 PM 540 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark Shultz

117 posts in 2595 days


03-08-2018 11:02 PM

I am about to build myself a new exterior / front door. I have the main door design figured out, but have not found much info on the alternative ways to weatherproof the door around the jamb. Any recommendations or source material references? I have a subscription to fine woodworking, but that only covers the door, and not the weatherproofing


11 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1491 posts in 368 days


#1 posted 03-08-2018 11:36 PM

look at the door on your house now.
it is not the door itself that has the weatherstripping – it is the door jamb
that has the special rubber seal that helps to keep it air tight.

is that what you mean ??

if you are building a new door opening from scratch, you can buy the weather strip and stop
piece that is attached inside the jamb – or a fully assembled jamb to fit your door size.

More info as to what you are wanting to do will be helpful – as well as some photos.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 310 days


#2 posted 03-09-2018 12:07 AM

I’m with John here.

Wut?

I’m not sure I understand the question and concern.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

477 posts in 407 days


#3 posted 03-09-2018 12:36 AM

https://www.amazon.com/M-D-Building-Products-91868-Weatherstrip/dp/B000CRHZB8/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1520555589&sr=8-5&keywords=d+weatherstripping

simple to use, kerf the door stop to receive the tongue, and walla, nicely sealed door. be sure to install this and slightly compress when setting location of strike on jamb side, this will ensure a slight compression to seal all around door, also be sure to have latch in place so when setting up the dead bolt latch on frame.
most make a mistake and don’t latch them together, and you get a sloppy seal.
meaning, the handle set latches, but you have to push or pull the door to get dead bolt to set in jamb strike.

I have that issue with new guys hanging doors for us, only takes a few times having to go out and re do a stop, put in a dutchman, ect. to fix the fubar,

I have built quite a few custom doors over the years, and seems like i learn a little nuance each time.
good luck
nothing like a well built entry door to the castle.
Rj in az

View Rich's profile

Rich

3900 posts in 795 days


#4 posted 03-09-2018 04:50 AM

Unless the existing weatherstrip is rotted, leave it. Just be sure to account for it when you mortise for your hinges so the door closes properly.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1647 days


#5 posted 03-09-2018 06:10 AM

What part of the world are you in? Our standard weatherstrip is Q-lon, kerf-in. You cut a saw kerf in the rabbetted jamb before assembly and the WS is pressed in by hand.

We get ours from Pemko
East coasters use Zero, I believe

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

117 posts in 2595 days


#6 posted 03-09-2018 02:29 PM

Thanks guys. My current door has a folded metal piece that interlocks with the jamb. It is very tidy and professional looking. Since it’s going to be a showpiece door, i was hoping to have the weatherproofing part be up to snuff with the door. The kerf-in looks easy to do (didn’t even know that existed), but i wasn’t expecting to have to see a big rubber piece surrounding my new wooden door!

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1491 posts in 368 days


#7 posted 03-09-2018 03:20 PM

Mark – when you say: “it’s going to be a showpiece door”, does this mean it will
serve as an example for potential customers to see in person ?? or, just from photos.
then you say: “the current weatherstripping is very tidy and professional looking”.
a bit confused here on that part of why you want to change it.
photos of your existing door and trim would be interesting to see.

I have used this product for several years in older homes that did not have
the new-er style jambs with the weatherstrip as big as your thumb.

http://richterweatherstripping.com/

I get it at my local BigBlu store and it is made here in Orlando, FL near me.
this is a common piece of door hardware and it or similar products may be available
in your area. It is installed after the door is hung in an existing frame after
all the latches, locks and strikes have been installed.
it has a low profile, comes bare finger-jointed pine, ready to install, prime and paint.
it can be used to hide the unsightly larger weatherstripping or to improve the seal in existing older homes.
I can send you some photos if you need to see how it looks after it is installed.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

117 posts in 2595 days


#8 posted 03-10-2018 10:08 PM

John, it will be a show piece just for me and wife. The weather strip is nice looking, but the door is bad, and the new door is going to be a different size anyway (larger, doing some reno). My neighbor has a very expensive looking new custom door and it had the same folded metal piece.

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

117 posts in 2595 days


#9 posted 03-10-2018 10:09 PM

John, it will be a show piece just for me and wife. The weather strip is nice looking, but the door is bad, and the new door is going to be a different size anyway (larger, doing some reno). My neighbor has a very expensive looking new custom door and it had the same folded metal piece.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1491 posts in 368 days


#10 posted 03-10-2018 11:01 PM

looks like a fun project ~ hope you can post some photos as you go along.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Mark Shultz's profile

Mark Shultz

117 posts in 2595 days


#11 posted 04-16-2018 11:32 PM

When making staves and alternating the pieces, do you guys just twist every other stave piece, or do you flip them ling ways also.

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