LumberJocks

Beeswax finishes, and stinky finishes...

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by Vasko posted 04-25-2011 05:04 AM 1063 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Vasko's profile

Vasko

271 posts in 2153 days


04-25-2011 05:04 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question walnut finishing beeswax

Hey there,
Here is my newbie question of the day;

I love beeswax for just about anything. Lotions, lip blams, soaps – you get it. I’ve been reading up on wood finishing formulas using beeswax. My question is – are these typically used only for toys and food surfaces? What if you had interior furniture or “artsy” wall or floor pieces that didn’t get much handling? Is it too soft? I ask because I’m very put off by the odors in most every store bought oil base finish I’ve tried. No, I haven’t tried water base finishes – the few works I’ve seen done locally with water based finishes didn’t seem to have the same luster or depth to me. That could be completely in my imagination, since I have degrees in oil painting and printmaking! lol I’m definitely biased! Oddly, I love the solvent smells of turps and linseed oil in paints and inks, so it must be some other basic ingredient in varnishes I don’t like. (y’know, I don’t like to paint with watercolors or acrylic paints either, so I must have a bias) I played with dewaxed shellac recently, and loved the lack of scent, after the medicinal alcohol smell left in seconds. So, if I don’t want to use water based finishes, do I just need to suck it up, grow a backbone, and truck on? ; ) Or are there beeswax/other options? Thanks!
PS – I do believe I’ll be working mostly in walnut, so that’s a consideration…

-- - Cindy, texture freak -


3 replies so far

View William's profile

William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#1 posted 04-25-2011 01:47 PM

I use shellac on most anything myself. The fumes give me a high (something I don’t like). I had to bite the bullet and overpay for a good respirator mask to be able to use it.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Vasko's profile

Vasko

271 posts in 2153 days


#2 posted 04-25-2011 05:31 PM

LOL – before I say anything else, I have to tell you I love your signature line!
I don’t use a respirator, but I nag my friends about it. My problem is that I don’t have a shop or even a room to use just for woodworking – I do everything in my livingroom (I live in a mobile home – no place to escape to!) I vent the place by using a window fan to draw the smell out, but only when it’s not too cold outside. So even if I used a respirator – and I know I should – the smell lingers while the finish cures. I was just poking around at the transtint website, and saw the Liberon wax. They suggest using it over shellac, and I was thinking about trying some over the dewaxed shellac on scrap wood. I have a can of dewaxed here but I’ve never used regular shellac yet. I don’t mind the idea of regular maintenance for wax finishes. Actually, the idea of a surface that can be freshened regularly and fixed easily is very appealing. I’ve always felt I was a reincarnated Mad Scientist, so I’m looking forward to playing with all the different products – even waterbase – lol.

Thanks for replying, William ~

-- - Cindy, texture freak -

View William's profile

William

9906 posts in 2309 days


#3 posted 04-25-2011 10:02 PM

SInce explaining that you do everything in your living room, I wouldn’t recommend shellac either.
I hate the respirator. Once though I refused to use it while shellacing a large piece. I was just having one of my stubborn days. A while later, when my head was spinning, I felt nauseated, and had a headache that lasted a week, I remembered why I usually use it.
Another good option for you would be multiple coats of Johnson’s Paste Wax. It dries hard enough. I have built chests and put up to five layers on them. There are a few I have had out for over two years now with nothing but Johnson’s Paste Wax on it and they have held up fine. Basically I use it like I’m waxing a car. Rub it on. Let it dry till I can see the pasty swirls in it. Then buff, buff, buff. Don’t get crazy though. Doing it by hand does a better job. I got crazy once and used an electric buffer for a car. All it done was take the wax back down to the bare wood. Waxing wood doesn’t handle electric buffers too good from my experience.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com