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Implementing dust collector vented outside. Help needed.

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Forum topic by SweetTea posted 03-07-2018 12:39 PM 3187 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


03-07-2018 12:39 PM

So I have decided to take off the motor and blower off of my Grizzly 3HP dust collector and mount it up on the wall in my shop so that I can pipe the dust outside through an existing hole in the wall. My shop has thick solid concrete walls so I have to use an existing hole, which is 8ft up on the side wall, and 2 foot from the ceiling. I will also remove the intake and use 6” PVC connected directly to the intake where there used to be three 4” ports. I plan to make a big, strong bracket to hold the motor and blower up on the wall.

My question to you guys is, what can I use to go from the output side of the blower, through the wall to get the dust and chips outside? The output side on the blower housing is square as you can see on the pic. I have to mount the d/c at a slight angle up on the wall so that the intake will point towards the area that the trunk line will need to go. So I was thinking that I could build a square tube out of 3/4 ply that would attach to the output side of the blower and be around 3ft to 4ft long to be the vent that carries the dust/chips outside.

My last question is: If the above plan doesn’t end up being doable for what ever reason, and if I had to leave the d/c on the ground, would it be bad to have the vent on the output side around 10ft to 12ft long and have a somewhat gradual 90 degree bend in it to get it up the wall and out the hole? Again, I would have to build a square shaped vent out of 3/4” ply.

Thanks in advanced for the help guys. Also, any one that can offer advice on the vent design itself would be great.


15 replies so far

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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


#1 posted 03-07-2018 12:39 PM

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 210 days


#2 posted 03-07-2018 01:04 PM

What’s the size and shape of the hole in the wall? Are you having to adapt to that?

An HVAC shop can make just about any shape and size of adapter you’d need out of sheet metal in minutes. May cost you $40 or so, but if you have to go from square to round it’s definitely the easiest option.

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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


#3 posted 03-07-2018 05:42 PM



What s the size and shape of the hole in the wall? Are you having to adapt to that?

An HVAC shop can make just about any shape and size of adapter you d need out of sheet metal in minutes. May cost you $40 or so, but if you have to go from square to round it s definitely the easiest option.

- BoardButcherer

I would rather just use some scrap 1/2” or 3/4” ply and make a square tube with a flange on the end to attach to the outlet of the d/c. The opening is large enough that I can make the square tube go straight through and then I can cover the remaining area up. I was just wondering if it would be bad to use a square shaped tube versus a round shaped tube for the output side, and if it would hurt the performance if it was curved? I know that on the intake side you don’t want 90 degree bends, but would a 90 degree bend hurt on the output side?

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Loren

10477 posts in 3764 days


#4 posted 03-07-2018 05:48 PM

I think you would have to put a long and awkward
run of duct on the outlet side to reduce the efficiency
of whatever ducting you had on the inlet.

I’d try to make the bend gentle. Square duct is used
all the time in HVAC so I doubt it will be an issue.

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 210 days


#5 posted 03-07-2018 05:56 PM


I would rather just use some scrap 1/2” or 3/4” ply and make a square tube with a flange on the end to attach to the outlet of the d/c. The opening is large enough that I can make the square tube go straight through and then I can cover the remaining area up. I was just wondering if it would be bad to use a square shaped tube versus a round shaped tube for the output side, and if it would hurt the performance if it was curved? I know that on the intake side you don’t want 90 degree bends, but would a 90 degree bend hurt on the output side?

- SweetTea

The type of fans used in dust collectors don’t really care whether they’re pushing or pulling, a 90 degree on the output is going to have the same effect as a 90 degree on the intake.

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Loren

10477 posts in 3764 days


#6 posted 03-07-2018 06:02 PM

You’re going to gain a big bump in suction just
by removing the outlet filter too.

I have a modest 1.5hp cyclone which works
pretty well when the filter is clean. The filter
doesn’t stay clean long though and vacuum
plummets. I’ve thought about venting it outside
since the filter is such a pain in the butt to
maintain.

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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


#7 posted 03-08-2018 01:40 PM

I have been planning to have only one drop on this 6” trunk line, and it will be at the very end of the run. Now I am thinking about possibly having one more drop at the front of the line, if possible. If I go with two drops in the 6” trunk line, how would I implement this? Would I use a 6” tee fitting or a wye fitting? Would this hurt the performance in a significant way?

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Dustin

551 posts in 857 days


#8 posted 03-08-2018 03:52 PM


I have been planning to have only one drop on this 6” trunk line, and it will be at the very end of the run. Now I am thinking about possibly having one more drop at the front of the line, if possible. If I go with two drops in the 6” trunk line, how would I implement this? Would I use a 6” tee fitting or a wye fitting? Would this hurt the performance in a significant way?

- SweetTea

A wye fitting, for sure (T’s generate a lot more turbulence and loss trying to move air around that sharp 90). And if you’re not planning on using the 2 machines from these drops simultaneously, I can’t imagine adding this would have much of an impact.

Edit: to clarify, using a wye and a 45 degree elbow is much better than using a T. In general, 2 45’s are superior to 1 90, as the transition is easier. Though there are long sweeping 90 degree transition pieces in ducting for just this reason.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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fivecodys

1116 posts in 1752 days


#9 posted 03-08-2018 04:41 PM


You re going to gain a big bump in suction just
by removing the outlet filter too.

I have a modest 1.5hp cyclone which works
pretty well when the filter is clean. The filter
doesn t stay clean long though and vacuum
plummets. I ve thought about venting it outside
since the filter is such a pain in the butt to
maintain.

- Loren

That is exactly what I did Loren. I also have a 1-1/2 HP Blower and I send the dust through a SDD and then out of the garage via a 6” dryer vent. So far it seems to be working well.
This is a very new installation so time will tell.

-- There' are two theories to arguin' with a woman. Neither one works.

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MrRon

4986 posts in 3359 days


#10 posted 03-08-2018 07:07 PM

I have a separator barrel in the shop ahead of the blower. The blower is mounted up on the wall and exhausts directly out doors; works great using 4” ducts. I would avoid using wood, due to friction loss.

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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


#11 posted 03-09-2018 01:51 PM


I would rather just use some scrap 1/2” or 3/4” ply and make a square tube with a flange on the end to attach to the outlet of the d/c. The opening is large enough that I can make the square tube go straight through and then I can cover the remaining area up. I was just wondering if it would be bad to use a square shaped tube versus a round shaped tube for the output side, and if it would hurt the performance if it was curved? I know that on the intake side you don’t want 90 degree bends, but would a 90 degree bend hurt on the output side?

- SweetTea

The type of fans used in dust collectors don t really care whether they re pushing or pulling, a 90 degree on the output is going to have the same effect as a 90 degree on the intake.

- BoardButcherer

Let me ask you guys this. I have two other dust collectors that I am considering also venting outside. They are the older Harbor Freight 2HP units. Would the 2HP Harbor Freight d/c be capable of having a 6” trunk line on them? Or is that asking too much of them? Right now I have a 4” trunk line on the HF units.

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Dustin

551 posts in 857 days


#12 posted 03-09-2018 02:03 PM


I would rather just use some scrap 1/2” or 3/4” ply and make a square tube with a flange on the end to attach to the outlet of the d/c. The opening is large enough that I can make the square tube go straight through and then I can cover the remaining area up. I was just wondering if it would be bad to use a square shaped tube versus a round shaped tube for the output side, and if it would hurt the performance if it was curved? I know that on the intake side you don’t want 90 degree bends, but would a 90 degree bend hurt on the output side?

- SweetTea

The type of fans used in dust collectors don t really care whether they re pushing or pulling, a 90 degree on the output is going to have the same effect as a 90 degree on the intake.

- BoardButcherer

Let me ask you guys this. I have two other dust collectors that I am considering also venting outside. They are the older Harbor Freight 2HP units. Would the 2HP Harbor Freight d/c be capable of having a 6” trunk line on them? Or is that asking too much of them? Right now I have a 4” trunk line on the HF units.

- SweetTea

I wouldn’t think the stock HF DC would run a 6” line very well, but maybe if it had the Rikon impeller upgrade everyone talks about. I replaced mine with the Jet impeller (you have to bore it out to fit the HF shaft, but it worked great), and it generates enough suction that it actually starts to collapse my 4” expandable flex hose from Rockler.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


#13 posted 03-11-2018 11:01 AM



What s the size and shape of the hole in the wall? Are you having to adapt to that?

An HVAC shop can make just about any shape and size of adapter you d need out of sheet metal in minutes. May cost you $40 or so, but if you have to go from square to round it s definitely the easiest option.

- BoardButcherer


I think you would have to put a long and awkward
run of duct on the outlet side to reduce the efficiency
of whatever ducting you had on the inlet.

I d try to make the bend gentle. Square duct is used
all the time in HVAC so I doubt it will be an issue.

- Loren

Can you guys confirm whether or not the 2HP Harbor Freight d/c can support a 6” trunk line, if the filter and collection bag are taken off and the exhaust vented outside as well?

I got my 3HP Grizzly unit mounted on the wall and will be finishing it up this week. As I said earlier, I also have two other 2HP Harbor Freight units that I am going to vent outside as well. I currently have the Harbor Freight units with 4” PVC trunk lines, and am trying to figure out if upgrading to a 6” trunk would be better, especially considering that they will get vented outdoors at the same time as changing out the 4” trunk line for 6” trunk line.

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SweetTea

352 posts in 776 days


#14 posted 03-12-2018 10:05 AM


I would rather just use some scrap 1/2” or 3/4” ply and make a square tube with a flange on the end to attach to the outlet of the d/c. The opening is large enough that I can make the square tube go straight through and then I can cover the remaining area up. I was just wondering if it would be bad to use a square shaped tube versus a round shaped tube for the output side, and if it would hurt the performance if it was curved? I know that on the intake side you don’t want 90 degree bends, but would a 90 degree bend hurt on the output side?

- SweetTea

The type of fans used in dust collectors don t really care whether they re pushing or pulling, a 90 degree on the output is going to have the same effect as a 90 degree on the intake.

- BoardButcherer

Let me ask you guys this. I have two other dust collectors that I am considering also venting outside. They are the older Harbor Freight 2HP units. Would the 2HP Harbor Freight d/c be capable of having a 6” trunk line on them? Or is that asking too much of them? Right now I have a 4” trunk line on the HF units.

- SweetTea

I wouldn t think the stock HF DC would run a 6” line very well, but maybe if it had the Rikon impeller upgrade everyone talks about. I replaced mine with the Jet impeller (you have to bore it out to fit the HF shaft, but it worked great), and it generates enough suction that it actually starts to collapse my 4” expandable flex hose from Rockler.

- Dustin

How much did you pay for the Jet impeller? We’re there any other modifications necessary to install the Jet impeller besides boring out the shaft location? Would the Rikon be a bolt on upgrade or does anything have to be modified for the Rikon to fit?

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Dustin

551 posts in 857 days


#15 posted 03-12-2018 11:47 AM

I think the Jet impeller ran me $110 shipped or thereabouts. I have a metalworking friend who helped me out drilling out the impeller from 19mm to 20mm (went very smoothly, drilled nicely with just a little lubricant). And while I had heard of someone else doing this upgrade needing to sand the shaft key down a smidge to fit, mine worked just fine with no issues.

I don’t have personal experience with the Rikon, but everyone here indicates it is a straight bolt-on replacement. I just went with the Jet as it was a little cheaper and available immediately.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

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