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Forum topic by rehuds62 posted 03-05-2018 10:33 PM 571 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rehuds62

19 posts in 411 days


03-05-2018 10:33 PM

I’ve built a dozen trestle tables over the years but never anything as large as this and my main concern is making this 16 ft by 4 ft top from solid red oak because it will weigh SO MUCH!!!. He wants a thick table (2.5”) and at 44 lbs per cubic foot, I end up with a top that weighs 586 lbs. Almost impossible to work with unless you have cranes in your shop. I was thinking that I could make the outside edge 2.5” and all the rest of the top (of the interior section) I’d make at 1.25” thick. / this brings the weight down to 338 lbs. .... which is, at least, possible to manipulate (turn over, etc.) I’m looking for EXPERIENCED woodworkers to tell me if they think that my design (to make it lighter) will still be strong enough for this 16X4 size. I’ll thank you guys in advance. I think it will be fine but I’d love to hear what others think…..

-- russell, New York, http://www.hudsoncabinetmaking.com


8 replies so far

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2789 posts in 2411 days


#1 posted 03-05-2018 10:56 PM

I’m not that EXPERIENCED but that would most likely sag without any kind of apron.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1801 posts in 3557 days


#2 posted 03-05-2018 11:20 PM

If the customer is OK with that it should work. It is the over all thickness he wants or just the appearance of being thick. If it is the latter you could just add a skirt. I would put biscuits, dowels or splines between the boards to keep them level.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3762 days


#3 posted 03-06-2018 12:03 AM

Should work fine, I think.

I’d consider doing the middle as a torsion box
or like a stave core door. Even with the
weight you’re at it’s gonna be hella heavy
and awkward.

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

358 posts in 733 days


#4 posted 03-06-2018 06:22 PM

Try using the sagulator http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/
Treat the top between the supports as a shelf and your edges as edging strip.

-- Sawdust Maker

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 208 days


#5 posted 03-06-2018 09:30 PM

What do you have for structure in your shop?

Throwing together a quick rope and pulley system to suspend it, flip it and do whatever doesn’t take much time at all and can be stowed away in the bottom cabinet until you need it next year.

As long as your roof joists are solid enough that you wouldn’t mind hanging it from them.

If you need more mobility you can throw some track up there too in a matter of minutes, and that helps distribute some of the weight. Track costs

Hell, an I-beam track and trolley only costs $200.

You’ve got a lot of options for handling it other than brute force.

View rehuds62's profile

rehuds62

19 posts in 411 days


#6 posted 03-06-2018 10:03 PM

I think I’ll make it as drawn here but may add a small piece of angle iron underneath to keep the center from cupping / will have to have enlongated screw slots at it’s ends for wood movement / I might see if using the overhead joists helps (ty, Boardbutcher) / ty, gentlemen

-- russell, New York, http://www.hudsoncabinetmaking.com

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

442 posts in 1608 days


#7 posted 03-07-2018 12:50 AM

+1 need to check Sag calculations

My question is does customer have a plan on how to move it into place when done?
16’ long table top will be hard to move around corners, and not many elevators can handle that length either?
Sure hope you are not offering delivery and installation services?
Reason I mention this:
Had a former boss who ordered a 18’ long custom bubinga slab table for executive conference room. It was gorgeous heavy piece of wood. After watching the table sit in headquarters lobby for over a month, found only solution was to remove windows and use a crane to move the table into the 3rd floor conference room, which cost him as much the table cost to buy.

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View rehuds62's profile

rehuds62

19 posts in 411 days


#8 posted 03-07-2018 02:27 PM



+1 need to check Sag calculations

My question is does customer have a plan on how to move it into place when done?
16 long table top will be hard to move around corners, and not many elevators can handle that length either?
Sure hope you are not offering delivery and installation services?
Reason I mention this:
Had a former boss who ordered a 18 long custom bubinga slab table for executive conference room. It was gorgeous heavy piece of wood. After watching the table sit in headquarters lobby for over a month, found only solution was to remove windows and use a crane to move the table into the 3rd floor conference room, which cost him as much the table cost to buy.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz


All that has been figured out / he’ll have a number of men waiting for me when I arrive / it’s on the first floor of a home that appears more like a gymnasium / I’ll set it up there…. never to be moved again (they told me)

-- russell, New York, http://www.hudsoncabinetmaking.com

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