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Forum topic by ChicksWithTools posted 03-04-2018 07:48 PM 851 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChicksWithTools

49 posts in 820 days


03-04-2018 07:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I just finished a simple project of putting new hardware on a dresser which required small pilot holes. After killing all my 1/16” titanium coated drill bits in a Ryobi drill bit kit, does anyone have a recommendation of brands/types that don’t break so easily?

Thanks

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs


20 replies so far

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 592 days


#1 posted 03-04-2018 07:50 PM

1/16” drill bits break easily. I bought a pack of a dozen just because of that.

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 592 days


#2 posted 03-04-2018 09:08 PM

Here’s an example from Amazon.

View ChicksWithTools's profile

ChicksWithTools

49 posts in 820 days


#3 posted 03-04-2018 10:13 PM

That’s better than the Home Depot party pack price

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7053 posts in 2403 days


#4 posted 03-04-2018 11:51 PM

+1 for buying them in bulk. 7 piece set at HF is $1.99 and are as good as any.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View pontic's profile

pontic

650 posts in 812 days


#5 posted 03-04-2018 11:55 PM

I second the HF purchase. Use low pressure and lower speed with those little guys.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View Andre's profile

Andre

2223 posts in 2010 days


#6 posted 03-05-2018 12:02 AM

I have used a small hand powered drill for a lot of smaller drilling jobs, sort of like a jewellery’s drill but a little bigger.
Lee Valley sells a couple of different types, and of course breakage still possible!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8525 posts in 2781 days


#7 posted 03-05-2018 12:09 AM

View Walker's profile

Walker

150 posts in 676 days


#8 posted 03-05-2018 12:11 AM

*bookmarking things from this thread

Usually when I need a small hole I’ll break the 1/16” bit, and the spare, then break both 5/64th bits, then the 3/32 bit, then throw whatever I was working on at the wall and break that too.

-- ~Walker

View ChicksWithTools's profile

ChicksWithTools

49 posts in 820 days


#9 posted 03-05-2018 12:22 AM

I didn’t consider HF as my brother says “Friends don’t let friends shop at Harbor Freight” but I did sneak in there without his knowledge and buy some clamps. I guess if its an item that breaks easily not matter which brand, then the cheapest party pack works :)

-- Courageous convictions will drag the dream into existence. - Rush, Vital Signs

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1109 posts in 1743 days


#10 posted 03-05-2018 12:35 AM



I didn t consider HF as my brother says “Friends don t let friends shop at Harbor Freight” but I did sneak in there without his knowledge and buy some clamps. I guess if its an item that breaks easily not matter which brand, then the cheapest party pack works :)

- ChicksWithTools

HF has its place and if you know what to look for, you can save a TON without sacrificing much on quality, if any.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12431 posts in 2584 days


#11 posted 03-05-2018 12:38 AM

Dull bits require more pressure which flexes the bit breaking it; and cheap bits are dull. Just be extra careful and/or buy high quality bits that cut easier and cleaner. I bought some US made bits and they cut wood like it’s butter.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

199 posts in 979 days


#12 posted 03-05-2018 12:50 AM

As a 45 year Machinist I know that the biggest cause of drill failure is runout,then not keeping it straight while drilling.
Then not clearing the flutes and burning.
1/16 drills need the correct RPM for the job and need to have the swarf cleared and need cooling or oil,if your drilling metal.
Probably nothing wrong with your bits,all you are drilling is wood. Misalignment is your problem.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2895 posts in 2229 days


#13 posted 03-05-2018 04:26 AM

HF cobalt bits are as good as anybody’s, in my experience. But I’ve found all cobalt bits a bit brittle. I have to replace mine as they break.

But 1/16” seem awfully tiny. What kind of hardware attaches with fastenings that small? Some of my drill chucks won’t even grip a bit that small.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 298 days


#14 posted 03-05-2018 01:32 PM

HSS and black oxide bits. They don’t have to be the sharpest bits ever, we’re working in wood, and those two are typically much more flexible than other materials which means you get a little more oops factor before it snaps like dry spaghetti.

View ScottM's profile

ScottM

691 posts in 2350 days


#15 posted 03-05-2018 02:20 PM



I didn t consider HF as my brother says “Friends don t let friends shop at Harbor Freight” but I did sneak in there without his knowledge and buy some clamps. I guess if its an item that breaks easily not matter which brand, then the cheapest party pack works :)

- ChicksWithTools

I consider HF my “disposable products” source…

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