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Forum topic by Hockey posted 03-04-2018 04:30 PM 585 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hockey

146 posts in 613 days


03-04-2018 04:30 PM

I am looking to buy a lathe as indicated in another thread I started. My garage shop is only wired for 110. One of the lathes I am considering is the Jet 1640EVS. I would like to understand how a VFD system works, particularly as to amps drawn. The main reason for this is to determine factors on the use of an extesnion cord, and also curious to know how it works.

As an example, according to the Jet 1640EVS manual, the motor is 1.5 hp, 3phase, 230 volts and 60hz. The input power is 115 volts, with a recommended 15 amp circuit. The full load amps is 4.6. The starting amps is 5.8, and the running no load amps is 3.

If I understand this correctly, the voltage going into the vfd is 115 and the vfd drive then converts the single phase 115 volts to 230 volts while only using 4.6 amps at full load. I don’t know if I am correctly understanding the amps part.

Let’s say my outlet is on a 15 amp circuit (it is actually on a 20 amp circuit, the best I can tell). Is the total amperage being used from my outlet only 4.6 amps at full load and only 5.8 amps at start-up? So is this tool only using the minimal amout of amps from my electrical circuit?

My table saw on the other hand shows dual voltage 14.3 amps at 110 and much less amps at 220. Of course it is wired at 110 in my shop. So, is my table saw using about 14.3 amps from my circuit while the VFD lathe will only be using around 5 amps? Would this mean that I have about 10 amps to pare on a 15 amp circuit with a vfd lathe and very little to spare with the table saw?


8 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7046 posts in 2400 days


#1 posted 03-04-2018 04:53 PM

It’s 4.6A @ 230V three phase – so about 16A @115V single phase (4.6 X 1.73 X 2) not including any VFD overhead or losses. They recommend a 20A circuit.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View JollyGreen67's profile

JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 2964 days


#2 posted 03-04-2018 05:52 PM

Whatever lathe you choose you better hurry, as steel prices are going up !

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

146 posts in 613 days


#3 posted 03-04-2018 06:22 PM



It s 4.6A @ 230V three phase – so about 16A @115V single phase (4.6 X 1.73 X 2) not including any VFD overhead or losses. They recommend a 20A circuit.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

So, if I understand correctly, it would use about 16 amps on my circuit. The manual for the Jet 1640evs recommends a 15 amp circuit. So now I am really confused.

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2512 posts in 2046 days


#4 posted 03-04-2018 06:27 PM



Whatever lathe you choose you better hurry, as steel prices are going up !

- Jimbo4


But, they said there wouldn’t be any negatives downstream.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7046 posts in 2400 days


#5 posted 03-04-2018 07:44 PM

The manual for the Jet 1640evs recommends a 15 amp circuit. So now I am really confused.

Specs for that lathe on their web site says 20A. Even for a single phase motor, 1.5hp is really pushing the capacity of a 15A circuit.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2475 posts in 2336 days


#6 posted 03-04-2018 08:28 PM

Have the 110-115V, 1.5 HP, Jet EVS 1642 and have no problems running all day long on 110 circuit have no idea about amp’s drawn. If got the 2 HP version would change my electrical system to match those requirements.

When Jet first came out with 220V stated HP was 1.5 and somewhere along the line became 2 HP. Never seen that version so don’t know if any real difference. Know Jet says cannot fool around changing from 110 to 220V or vice versus on those motors. I take them at their word on that because of electronic hardware & programing which don’t even begin to understand.

Like I said if were getting the 2HP version would upgrade my electric line and plug. Would never try to use an extension cord would modify my shop so can plug the lathe in to a receptical.

-- Bill

View Hockey's profile

Hockey

146 posts in 613 days


#7 posted 03-05-2018 12:35 AM

Thanks, Brad. Interesting how the tech specs recommend 20 amp, while the manual (on the Jet website that you linked) in the specs section at page 5, and also on page 9 recommend 15 amp circuit.

View JollyGreen67's profile

JollyGreen67

1676 posts in 2964 days


#8 posted 03-05-2018 05:36 PM

Negatives downstream – SNORT – by whom ? :o(

-- When I was a kid I wanted to be older . . . . . this CRAP is not what I expected ! RIP 09/08/2018

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