LumberJocks

Jointer Plane for Beginner

  • Advertise with us

« back to Hand Tools forum

Forum topic by RedWoodworker posted 03-01-2018 03:19 PM 692 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View RedWoodworker's profile

RedWoodworker

34 posts in 212 days


03-01-2018 03:19 PM

Hello all,

I have grown frustrated trying to get perfect cuts on my table saw. Despite all the tweaks I’ve read about and tried, at the end of the day I think I need something more to make sure all sides of a piece are square and even.

I think a jointer plane may be just the tool for me. But I don’t want to three hundred dollars just based on a “thought.” Can anyone recommend an affordable jointer plane for a beginner, so I can try it out and see if it is what I’m looking for?

Bonus points if it is relatively easy to use out of the box – I have no experience with planes.

All input welcome. Thanks!


16 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1234 posts in 2021 days


#1 posted 03-01-2018 03:51 PM

Look for a number 7 Stanley restored by someone here like DonW. Www.timetestedtools.net

Warning, it takes a lot of practice to square an edge with a plane. So be prepared to practice!

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View RedWoodworker's profile

RedWoodworker

34 posts in 212 days


#2 posted 03-01-2018 04:38 PM

Thanks, Brian. I didn’t realize it took so much work – I was just hoping a few passes could straighten it. Maybe I will re-think my approach.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1234 posts in 2021 days


#3 posted 03-01-2018 04:44 PM

You just need to make sure your blade is set square, and get your technique down so you aren’t leaning the plane to one side or the other. It can be done, just takes practice.

There are other tricks too, like putting two boards that will be joined face to face and planinng both edges at thhe same time. Then it doesn’t matter what angle you are at since they will be complementary.

Give it chance. You can alwayhs resell the plane if you don’t like it. You may also find hand tools are faster and better at some things than power tools.

Briab

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15369 posts in 2644 days


#4 posted 03-01-2018 04:52 PM

A few passes can straighten an edge, Red. Hand tools are great for removing machine marks too. The longer the plane, the better the tool is for making the edges of long boards straight and true. Holding the tool properly is no accident, it takes practice. And that’s what Brian’s talking about. Then there’s keeping the blade sharp. Not just sharp, but scary sharp, so it cuts for best results. If none of this sounds interesting to you (and we’re just getting started!), then turn away from hand planes. Otherwise, dive in with a No. 7 and see what you think. One of those, refurbed and ready to go, will set you back between $75 and $125 maybe (total guess, haven’t bought one for awhile).

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View gargey's profile

gargey

997 posts in 801 days


#5 posted 03-01-2018 05:04 PM

This is a major rabbit hole you’re going into. FYI.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3674 days


#6 posted 03-01-2018 05:10 PM

A small power jointer is much easier to learn
how to use.

If you’re not getting square cross-cuts on your
table saw a cross-cut sled can help.

Hand planes can be interesting and satisfying
to work with but there’s an involved process
of learning about them and an investment in
sharpening equipment to consider.

Everybody says only the high end new planes
come ready to work out of the box.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

11792 posts in 2406 days


#7 posted 03-01-2018 05:20 PM

Woodworking is a learned skill and takes practice. My jointer is a $20 wood body transitional plane. It’s my favorite plane. But if you want one that is close to ready out of the box you’ll pay for it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View OSU55's profile (online now)

OSU55

1700 posts in 2015 days


#8 posted 03-01-2018 08:57 PM

Skill development – using, tuning, sharpening – is what takes the time with handplanes. Once the skills are there, handplanes can be a faster alternative to power tools, depending on the task. The power path for you is a jointer. I recommend against the hand held power planers for jointing – I have successfully use one, a nice Bosch unit, put it takes a practiced hand and stock prep, one little oh sh*t, and the surface needs another pass. Difficult to take off a little hear and a little there like you can with a hand plane.

I agree a Stanley Bailey #7 is the right plane for jointing, and a few LJ’ers sell refurbed ones at reasonable prices. It can be a slippery slope if you take a liking to hand planes. Don’t fall into the trap that aftermarket blades and chip breakers are required. Proper tuning will have oem parts working just fine. Here’s some info on hand planes if interested. Performance tuning info.

For squaring the ends of stock, research Shooting Boards. A #7 will work as a shooting board plane. A similar method can be used to square a long edge, using a smooth bench top and laying the plane on its side.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

420 posts in 1002 days


#9 posted 03-02-2018 01:40 AM

Don has a #6 for sale now if you work with smaller parts you can try this for a jointer.
http://www.timetestedtools.net/items-for-sale/timetestedtools-item-10/

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8207 posts in 2603 days


#10 posted 03-02-2018 02:24 AM

Stanley #6 Fore Plane (my # 6-072317-1) $62 (includes US shipping)

http://www.timetestedtools.net/items-for-sale/timetestedtools-item-10/

Good call corelz125

View Don W's profile

Don W

18754 posts in 2593 days


#11 posted 03-02-2018 12:27 PM

Thanks guys but That’s sharpened with a camber, probably not the best for using as a jointer.

I do have a #389 jointer fence. I just don’t have a good jointer to go with it right now.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

420 posts in 1002 days


#12 posted 03-02-2018 09:37 PM

Don sell an extra iron with it.

View Don W's profile

Don W

18754 posts in 2593 days


#13 posted 03-02-2018 10:20 PM



Don sell an extra iron with it.

- corelz125

I could, but I doubt I have one. Hock does though ;-)

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Don W's profile

Don W

18754 posts in 2593 days


#14 posted 03-02-2018 10:21 PM


Don sell an extra iron with it.

- corelz125

I could, but I doubt I have one. Hock does though ;-)

- Don W

At $100 that would still be a great deal IMO.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

420 posts in 1002 days


#15 posted 03-02-2018 11:23 PM

That would be a good set up to start off with

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com