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Plexiglass glue

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Forum topic by ohtimberwolf posted 03-01-2018 02:20 PM 587 views 1 time favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ohtimberwolf

813 posts in 2375 days


03-01-2018 02:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plexiglass

I am working on a custom dust collector to use at the blade of my table saw and I need to cement plexiglass parts together with a stong glue weld. I don’t know if acetone will work or not but if you have experience glueing this stuff I would appreciate your advice before doing the glueup. larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.


19 replies so far

View jbay's profile

jbay

2333 posts in 922 days


#1 posted 03-01-2018 02:27 PM

I wouldn’t use acetone.

Cyanoacrylate (Weld on #4)

There is also Weld on #16 that is slower setting and comes in a tube. It has a more syrup consistency.

I like to scrape the edges for a flat smooth surface for a better bond.
The Weld on 16 is good for rougher surfaces like edges with saw marks. It’s more gap filling.

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CharlesNeil

2410 posts in 3893 days


#2 posted 03-01-2018 02:28 PM

Is my understanding that MEK is used to bond plexiglass, it actually melts it and allows it to fuse together , i have not tried it however.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

990 posts in 185 days


#3 posted 03-01-2018 02:48 PM

what are you going to make out of plexiglass ? (a box or just build up layers, etc.)
I have done quite a bit of plexi-bonding and the only thing that I use is
like Jbay said: Weld-on 4™ Acrylic Cement. it is water thin and must be applied cautiously
with a hypodermic needle on a plastic bottle type applicator.
a 4oz can will last you forever – and then some.
experiment first to get the hang of it – it is not like any glue you have ever used.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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Nubsnstubs

1296 posts in 1753 days


#4 posted 03-01-2018 03:01 PM

If it’s 1/4” thick, why not drill, tap and screw it?.............. Jerry

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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lew

12100 posts in 3778 days


#5 posted 03-01-2018 05:29 PM

If you can find it, ethylene dichloride works great. I built several underwater housings using it as a solvent/weld but that was a long time ago and I don’t know if it is still available.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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John Smith

990 posts in 185 days


#6 posted 03-01-2018 06:30 PM

TimberWolf – check your PM box

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Sparks500's profile

Sparks500

181 posts in 353 days


#7 posted 03-02-2018 01:40 PM

Mine is built out of ¼” plexi. Drilled and tapped 6-32 screws to bolt it together. Has held up for 10 years.

-- A good day is any day that you're alive....

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ohtimberwolf

813 posts in 2375 days


#8 posted 03-02-2018 02:18 PM

Thanks to all of you guys. LJ’ers are always there! I have looked at many local stores and almost given up finding it in this town.
JUST IN:
Special thanks to a fellow LJ that is going to send me a one ounce bottle and that should be more than I will need.
Always amazed at the friends on LJ. Another great member!!

larry

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View jbay's profile

jbay

2333 posts in 922 days


#9 posted 03-02-2018 02:22 PM

John S, are you sending him the glue already filled in one of the applicator bottles? If not, I have one I could send.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1024 posts in 1975 days


#10 posted 03-02-2018 03:15 PM


If you can find it, ethylene dichloride works great. I built several underwater housings using it as a solvent/weld but that was a long time ago and I don t know if it is still available.

- lew

The resident chemist checking in again. Ethylene dichloride (a.k.a. 1, 2-dichloroethane) is classified as a suspected human carcinogen. It is a proven carcinogen in some animal species. It is teratogenic and very toxic to numerous organs such as the liver by exposure through inhalation of the vapors. If you can find it, please use it with adequate ventilation and wear a chemical respirator.

Note added: Well, for fun I looked up the MSDS for Weld-On #4. It contains a ton of methylene chloride. What I wrote above could be copied for the latter solvent. Use common sense when you work with these things.

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OnhillWW

130 posts in 1255 days


#11 posted 03-02-2018 03:42 PM

If I were to construct a fixture from plexiglass I would use silicone calk as an adhesive. This is commonly used for glass-to-glass construction in aquariums. It is surprisingly strong. I have also used it for wood to wood joints in R/C aircraft as it is strong and in the right application absorbs vibration. Never had a failure. You may want to use small screws to hold pieces together during the build.

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

990 posts in 185 days


#12 posted 03-02-2018 03:45 PM

Jbay – yes – I sent him some #4 today and the appropriate application needle kit.
he is good-to-go with a little more instruction and accurate information.

not to jack Larry’s post, but, to add a little insight as to the possibilities of SCIGRIP adhesive.

I remember when I first saw this type of adhesive back in the ‘70s . . . thinking, wow, that is so cool !!!
after I had my sign shop up and running in the ‘80s, I was approached by a contractor about building
a dedication bronze plaque for a newly built hospital.
I made the pattern out of textured plexiglass with plastic letters glued on and sent to the foundry.
after it was cast, I cleaned up the plastic pattern and painted it to resemble the bronze plaque and
hung it in my office. the builder saw it and ordered 3 copies of the plastic model for gifts to the
hospital chairman, the architect and the city mayor. I registered the “process” under the trademark
“BronzeLike” plaques and advertised in several trade magazines. it was very profitable.
here are some examples of what you can do with some scrap textured plexiglass, some plastic letters
and some #4 SCIGRIP . . . . . (all three are 100% plastic patterns) and about 24” square.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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jbay

2333 posts in 922 days


#13 posted 03-02-2018 03:56 PM

Very cool signs.
I worked as a plastic fabricator (also in the 70’s when the Weld on cans were white with red print) for a gaming company for about 3 years, so I’ve had me fill of fabricating.
From flame polishing 1” acrylic to cold forming Lexan and just about everything in between. But never did signs like that. I used to make wood and acrylic signs for Citibank, but nothing like the signs above.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1024 posts in 1975 days


#14 posted 03-02-2018 04:00 PM

John,

Those plaques look amazing. You were like a one-man CNC machine!

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

990 posts in 185 days


#15 posted 03-02-2018 04:11 PM

LOL Kazooman – - – my fellow signmaker in my county (there were only two of us)
was strictly a vinyl fabricator (sticker shop). after he got comfortable in the biz, he bought a
4×8 CNC for boucou bucks . . . he continually asked me to come “fine tune” his
cut work because his computer was stupid and couldn’t carve worth a pile of bear scat.
(he had zero craftsman skills and tools) I can’t help but to remember the phrase: GI-GO.
we all have our different talents – art in many mediums just happens to be mine.
thanks for the kind words.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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