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Keeping white ash pale when finished

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Forum topic by GRDKelowna posted 02-27-2018 05:28 PM 1423 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GRDKelowna

10 posts in 381 days


02-27-2018 05:28 PM

Hello all,

I’m currently working with a client on doing several projects throughout her home in white ash. She has some commercial pieces that are all quite pale, and to my mostly untrained eye look like they might not even have a finish. I made a piece for her, and finished it with a satin polycrylic, but it actually changed the colour of the ash almost to a yellow. I was under the impression that polycrylic would not yellow the wood from previous projects (though a quick google search mid sentence informs me I’m ignorant.)

Long story short, anyone have suggestions for a finish that will keep ash pale?

-- Brian Martin, Kelowna, BC


17 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3768 days


#1 posted 02-27-2018 05:41 PM

Soap.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12340 posts in 2500 days


#2 posted 02-27-2018 09:03 PM

Don’t you have to constantly reapply soap? So is it really a “finish” ? lol

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 2985 days


#3 posted 02-27-2018 10:01 PM

Lacquer or water based poly don’t, just make the wood look wet to me.

Wet the wood with mineral spirits and see what it will look like, you will never get anything clearer than that.

It could be that this wood turns a slight yellow when wet?

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1834 posts in 2110 days


#4 posted 02-27-2018 11:05 PM

A water based finish such as gf high perf poly or Target em9000 poly or em6000 lacquer are the best bets. The “commercial” stuff may have stain or paint to keep it pale looking.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117203 posts in 3697 days


#5 posted 02-27-2018 11:27 PM

You may have to bleach it first then apply a clear coat.WB generally yellows the least or pre-cat lacquer.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

1250 posts in 1834 days


#6 posted 02-27-2018 11:37 PM

Loren says it all: Soap.
Yes, it is a real finish and it does hold up.
The base of this table: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/164674 and all of this project http://lumberjocks.com/projects/251626 are soap treated ash (european). This stool from larch as well: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/102120
Have not done anything yet to the lego table and the chair and have reaplied the table legs once in 2,5 years. Well reaplying sounds troublesome but is no more that washing with soap flakes and wiping off.

Give it a go and let ud know how it ends!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12340 posts in 2500 days


#7 posted 02-28-2018 12:42 AM

Water-based poly on ash

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 2985 days


#8 posted 02-28-2018 12:59 AM

Is it possible that the ash had a pickled or whitewash finish on it? Almost all of the ash I have seen does have a bit of a yellowish color to it like the above picture.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3768 days


#9 posted 02-28-2018 01:20 AM

The pale ash furniture your client has may
be a water white lacquer. Using that may be
impractical for you. It also typically looks like a film.

That’s why I suggested soap.

View GRDKelowna's profile

GRDKelowna

10 posts in 381 days


#10 posted 02-28-2018 01:59 AM

I checked out your link, and that looks perfect…any idea where I could find the kind of soap I need?


Loren says it all: Soap.
Yes, it is a real finish and it does hold up.
The base of this table: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/164674 and all of this project http://lumberjocks.com/projects/251626 are soap treated ash (european). This stool from larch as well: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/102120
Have not done anything yet to the lego table and the chair and have reaplied the table legs once in 2,5 years. Well reaplying sounds troublesome but is no more that washing with soap flakes and wiping off.

Give it a go and let ud know how it ends!

- kaerlighedsbamsen


-- Brian Martin, Kelowna, BC

View GRDKelowna's profile

GRDKelowna

10 posts in 381 days


#11 posted 02-28-2018 02:01 AM

https://eq3.com/ca/en/productdetail/living/media--storage/media-storage/tambour-62-credenza.html

This is one of the pieces she has, and by far has the most colour in it…the pieces I’ve made have had way more cream / yellow colour than even this.

-- Brian Martin, Kelowna, BC

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3225 posts in 3229 days


#12 posted 02-28-2018 03:20 AM

Some of the newer automotive clear coat paints will impart no color, are tough as nails, and will last a dog’s age. You might look into those. Just be careful which you use. Some are catalytic and inhaling the fumes can kill you if you don’t use protective equipment.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

View blueridge's profile

blueridge

21 posts in 208 days


#13 posted 02-28-2018 05:16 AM



The pale ash furniture your client has may
be a water white lacquer. Using that may be
impractical for you. It also typically looks like a film.

That s why I suggested soap.

- Loren

like handsoap?

View Walker's profile

Walker

146 posts in 592 days


#14 posted 02-28-2018 05:37 AM

I’m curious about the soap finish, how does it react to cleaning? For example if it’s dusty and the home owner takes a wet cloth to it or sprays it with Pledge cleaner or swiffer wipes or similar?

I ask because at one point I was looking for the “least noticeable finish” that would still provide some sort of protection. I got a suggestion of 50/50 mix of Elmer’s Clear Glue and water. Being adventurous I gave it a shot on the top of a tv stand. Once it dried the ‘wet’ look almost completely went away. I’m not sure how much protecting it’s actually doing, but it looked decent enough. Then one day my wife went to wipe the dust off with a wet rag, and it got all sticky, basically it turned into glue again.

-- ~Walker

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3768 days


#15 posted 02-28-2018 05:38 AM

like handsoap?

- blueridge

It’s not a finish I’ve used, but no, any old soap
won’t do on account of additives. You need pure
soap flakes. They’re more available than they
have been in quite awhile though. There are web sites
that sell soap flakes for woodworking and searching
for “pure soap flakes” on ebay will yield some
results as well. I can’t vouch for any of the flake
soap products though. I did read that Ivory soap
flakes are good, though they haven’t been made
in decades.

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