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Forum topic by bondogaposis posted 02-27-2018 04:19 PM 630 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bondogaposis

4931 posts in 2471 days


02-27-2018 04:19 PM

Topic tags/keywords: glue question joining

For those of you that use hot hide glue, what are you using for a glue pot? I want to try using it.

-- Bondo Gaposis


16 replies so far

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Andre

2019 posts in 1926 days


#1 posted 02-27-2018 04:22 PM

I picked up the little one from Lee Valley with the electric heater, okay for small project(bows) but too small IMO!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Mario

181 posts in 3516 days


#2 posted 02-27-2018 04:30 PM

I tried using a hot plate, wax melter, and plain stove and thermometer…....none were really practical, then I bought a Hold Heet pot (made in USA), pricey, but works perfectly and I can work all day and know my glue will be ready…
http://www.thebestthings.com/newtools/hide_glue.htm

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John Smith

1312 posts in 283 days


#3 posted 02-27-2018 04:37 PM

if you are going to be using hide glue on a regular basis, X2 on the Hold Heet pot.
just to experiment to see how it works and and if you like it or not, a double boiler with
a pot of water and a smaller stainless pot for the glue – like melting chocolate.
I have never used hide glue for gluing wood together. but, I have used quite a bit of it
when glue chipping glass for signs and art projects. it has a tenacious grip when dried, I can tell you that.

the optimum temperature is between 140° and 150°F. Be sure to use a candy thermometer.
it is very important to maintain this temperature and DO NOT go above 150°F or the batch will be ruined.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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Gene Howe

10839 posts in 3549 days


#4 posted 02-27-2018 04:48 PM

Having never used either, what are the differences between the hot glue and that in the bottle?

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3768 days


#5 posted 02-27-2018 04:53 PM

I use a crock pot in the smallest size. I
had one around so the cost to make it
was nothing. Works fine. I use little
jars I can put the lid on and refrigerate.
I cut a hole in the plastic lid for the jar
mouth and drilled several other holes
around to reduce the heat. I figured out
how many holes to drill using a candy
thermometer.

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Mario

181 posts in 3516 days


#6 posted 02-27-2018 05:23 PM

Gene, they basically work the same, are both reversible, but there is a wider variety of glue strengths/open time available with the hot glue.Hot hide glue is a great all around wood glue, it just requires some setup before use. It comes in different strengths with different open times, can be stained and is easy to clean and leaves no glue marks over the surface. Somewhat more expensive than PVA. The bottled one is chemically modified in order to stay liquid at room temperature, IMHO I would rather use regular PVA instead and keep using hot glue as it is…

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Gene Howe

10839 posts in 3549 days


#7 posted 02-27-2018 05:38 PM

Thanks, Mario.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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TheFridge

10129 posts in 1606 days


#8 posted 02-27-2018 07:25 PM

The holdheet works great.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Ocelot

2032 posts in 2758 days


#9 posted 02-27-2018 07:58 PM

Shipwright wrote of using old drip coffee makers he picked up at a yard sale.

http://lumberjocks.com/shipwright/blog/84986

I haven’t tried it.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

9451 posts in 2412 days


#10 posted 02-27-2018 08:07 PM

To try it I used a dip sized crock pot filled with water, and hide glue in a glass jar in that.

After deciding I’d keep using hot hide glue, I got a Hold Heet, and employ the same technique. Fill it with water, hot hide glue in a glass jar in the water.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN - http://www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods - http://www.TheModsquito.com

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2397 posts in 1508 days


#11 posted 02-27-2018 08:33 PM

I bought an antique glue pot off eBay and a cheap hot plate and use a cooking thermometer in the glue to keep an eye on the temperature. If you go the antique pot route, make sure that the part where the glue goes is not rusted and still has its original lining intact. When I only need a small amount, I put the glue into an old plastic spice bottle and fill the glue chamber with water and the glue bottle in that. If you can find a crock pot you can control the temperature on, you can use the spice bottle with that.

The main thing you need is the ability to control the temperature or it has to be set so that it gets no more than 160 F or it will spoil the glue. Figure out what setting is needed to keep it between 140 & 160 before heating your first batch.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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shipwright

8070 posts in 2918 days


#12 posted 02-27-2018 09:34 PM

I use these. They are probably the most common and they work flawlessly however they are expensive for trying out to see if you like it. http://www.woodworkingshop.com/product/em11510/?inMed=GSTORE&dfw_tracker=18711-1393&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsrS45YPH2QIVgz5pCh25bQI-EAQYASABEgKgN_D_BwE
Also they need the lid which for some strange reason is always sold separately.
You can see it in this photo along with another one that I use at the school. They both work well but the double boiler requires a little more tending. A kettle Ike this costs around $15. Just make sure you get one with a temp control.
PM me if you have any questions.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

3548 posts in 710 days


#13 posted 02-27-2018 09:35 PM

The Hold Heet is the standard. Mario posted a link to the best source in my opinion. They sell pint and quart sized and aluminum and copper pots. However, you’re in the $120 to $165 range.

If you are going to go with a crock pot setup, the only way to reliably control the temperature is with an electronic controller. Trying to poke holes, etc, leaves you susceptible to temperature variations when the ambient temperature changes. Here's one on Amazon that can control the temperature to within 0.1ºF. It’s $31 and a suitable crock pot is about $20.

I like to keep the glue in pint mason jars with a double-boiler setup. I had a first-generation Anova sous vide circulator to spare, so I rigged my own up using it in a 6 qt Cambro food storage container. I cut the lid to fit around the circulator to limit evaporation. Using it, I can grab a jar and have it near the work I’m doing, then put it back when I’m done.

Regarding Gene’s question about liquid versus hot glue, liquid glue has urea added to change lower the temperature at which it will remain liquid. The temperature will vary with the amount of urea added. You can make your own quite easily and it’s also very inexpensive compared to the commercial product. Also, you can add urea to hot hide glue to extend its open time.

The best source for glue granules at a reasonable price is from Patrick Edwards’ Old Brown Glue site.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Rich

3548 posts in 710 days


#14 posted 02-27-2018 10:49 PM

I forgot to mention in my last post that one benefit of hide glue, liquid or hot, that doesn’t get mentioned much is that it fluoresces under UV light. I have a blog series on UV in the workshop that discusses it.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2397 posts in 1508 days


#15 posted 02-28-2018 02:52 PM

I’ve thought about giving a hot wax warmer used for hair removal a try as well. One like this has an adjustable temperature, the range covers the range for hide glue (140-160F = 60-71C) not to mention is $100 cheaper than the ones designed for hide glue. It even has a removable pot that you can put into the fridge to save the leftover glue for the next day.

And when you aren’t using it in the shop, your wife can use it to remove the hair from your back. :-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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