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okay okay, i have another sanding question.

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Forum topic by Mark posted 04-18-2011 03:56 AM 1118 views 1 time favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark

1801 posts in 2738 days


04-18-2011 03:56 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question finishing sanding

So ya another sanding question due to the fact that I’m trying to really perfect my finish results. At what grit do you stop to start your finishing, and what grit do you use between and after finish coats (i use poly 90% of the time). I’m really trying to get the best finished results and I can’t quite nail it. :S

-- M.K.


18 replies so far

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Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3286 days


#1 posted 04-18-2011 04:04 AM

Mark, I generally stop with 150 grit if I am going to stain and 180 grit if I am going with a natural finish. The only exceptions to this are end grain. I will sand end grain to a higher grit (320) to close off the pores.

Between coats of poly I will sand with 400 grit.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

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bubinga

861 posts in 2132 days


#2 posted 04-18-2011 04:05 AM

The question is what are you doing now?

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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GMman

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#3 posted 04-18-2011 04:05 AM

Mark 1st coat 220 very lightly after that I use 600 to 1000 and I wait about 2 days to make sure it is hard dry then I use 1000 very lightly for a great shine.

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Mark

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#4 posted 04-18-2011 04:09 AM

awesome…thx! but doesn’t sanding after staining fade the stain? im confused with that :S

-- M.K.

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GMman

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#5 posted 04-18-2011 04:13 AM

Sanding lightly will not fade the stain

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Mark

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#6 posted 04-18-2011 04:16 AM

hand sand after stain?

-- M.K.

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GMman

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#7 posted 04-18-2011 04:18 AM

All hand sanding after the 1st coat

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Mark

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#8 posted 04-18-2011 04:25 AM

first coat of finish or stain?

-- M.K.

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GMman

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#9 posted 04-18-2011 04:27 AM

Finish

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Mark

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#10 posted 04-18-2011 04:29 AM

thx tons :D

-- M.K.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

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#11 posted 04-18-2011 04:32 AM

I agree with Scott stop at 150 apply finish let it dry lightly sand the finish with 350 and apply another coat. If you wish you can sand the 2nd or 3rd coat making sure you have plenty of finish applied and that it’s dry. you can go up to 3000 if you want a super high gloss.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Ryan's profile

Ryan

238 posts in 2394 days


#12 posted 04-18-2011 04:39 AM

For the final coat, even you smooth the final surface with 2000-grit, you sitll get
very fine scratches. To eliminate those, I wax the surface and rub it.
The surface is silky smooth and shiny.

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Mark

1801 posts in 2738 days


#13 posted 04-18-2011 05:34 AM

awesome :) thx a lot

-- M.K.

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

21564 posts in 3315 days


#14 posted 04-20-2011 05:59 AM

Hi Mark, you have some good advice there from your fellow Jocks. I find 000 cabinet makers steel wool is good for sanding between coats.
I have heard It does not hurt to wet the raw wood lightly to raise the grain before a final sand.
Sanding sealer is particularly good for open grained wood & sealing end grain.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Bernie's profile

Bernie

416 posts in 2301 days


#15 posted 04-20-2011 07:23 PM

I”ve been traveling, hope I’m not to late. Scott and Jim are on the money with my method of sanding. Any higher grit sanding on bare wood closes the finish. The only thing I would add is along grumpy’s advise. I machine sand with 100 – 120 – and 150 grit. I then wet my wood (by wet, I mean dampen so it takes about 20 minutes to dry). What this does is it pops out any dents left in the wood and it also raises the loose fibers of wood left by the machines. After the wood dries, pass your hand over it and you will feel whiskers. Before applying my stain, oil or poly, I hand sand these whiskers using 180 grit. Now your surface is ready.

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

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