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finish on copper ferrule ?

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Forum topic by Abter posted 02-26-2018 08:32 PM 830 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Abter

70 posts in 831 days


02-26-2018 08:32 PM

I am putting copper ferrule’s on handles I’m making for carbide tools. I can’t find a good discussion on whether I need to (or should…or could) put a finish on the polished copper ferrules. Do I leave the copper naked? use a varnish or shellac? a wax-and-varnish friction finish?

-- "Many men fish all their lives without ever realizing that it is not the fish they are after." {often mis-quoted as by H.D. Thoreau}


13 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3852 days


#1 posted 02-26-2018 08:36 PM

Lacquer is used on brass instruments. Prevents
oxidation.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10756 posts in 1690 days


#2 posted 02-26-2018 08:42 PM

Probably by far the best choice. I use wax on brass but it still ages slowly.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Notw's profile

Notw

672 posts in 1957 days


#3 posted 02-26-2018 09:29 PM

i’ve used copper on turned ornaments before and used sprayed lacquer and they seem to stay nice and shiny

View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

300 posts in 1827 days


#4 posted 02-27-2018 01:11 AM

I usually scotchbrite copper parts for a brushed finish so I’ll often leave them bare and figure on scotchbrite again if they tarnish. But I’ve had good results with shellac, too.

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12431 posts in 2584 days


#5 posted 02-27-2018 07:07 AM

My issue with copper ferrules has been that the copper tends to be splotchy or less shiny even if I apply a thin coat with a paper towel. Maybe I need to apply it thicker so I can buff it out. Next time I might try super glue. With no finish the copper eventually oxidizes.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View gwilki's profile

gwilki

227 posts in 1677 days


#6 posted 02-27-2018 04:55 PM

I leave the copper ferules on my tools “naked”. It’s a tool, not a piece of art. Over time, they change colour, but I really don’t mind it at all.

-- Grant Wilkinson, Ottawa ON

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

422 posts in 823 days


#7 posted 02-27-2018 05:58 PM

+1 on naked for tools.

-- Sawdust Maker

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1422 posts in 1934 days


#8 posted 02-27-2018 06:52 PM



I leave the copper ferules on my tools “naked”. It s a tool, not a piece of art. Over time, they change colour, but I really don t mind it at all.

- gwilki


Yep, totally agree. Tools must have that used look to be of any value…......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10756 posts in 1690 days


#9 posted 02-27-2018 07:23 PM

I like naked

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2638 posts in 1591 days


#10 posted 02-27-2018 08:57 PM

Another option is to add a patina to it. You can simply heat the ferrule with a torch to sort of pre-oxidize it, which gives it a nice aged look. You can even use borax or even just plain table salt to give it an interesting mottled red color after heating with the torch. Another approach that I saw in Shop Notes magazine was to put peanut oil or even boil linseed oil (no varnish) or tung oil and then heat it with a torch to give it a nice darkened color. Different types of oil will give you slightly colors.

Nothing wrong with a tool, especially one you make yourself, looking like a piece art.

Edit: You can see an example of a copper ferrule for an awl that I got an accidental patina on here:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/271778
I actually coated it with Tried and True varnish oil along with the rest of the handle but the patina was caused by repeatedly annealing the copper pipe with a torch as I was making it square. You’ll have to ask Rick M (Woodnack) how it held up because it was part of a LJ tools swap.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View rodneywt1180b's profile

rodneywt1180b

179 posts in 590 days


#11 posted 03-11-2018 08:49 PM

I tend to leave it naked and let it age on it’s own. Waxing it will slow the oxidation down. The problem with finishes is they will eventually crack, chip, get scratched, etc, then the copper underneath will oxidize anyway, usually in an unsightly way.
Rodney

-- Rodney, Centralia, WA, USA www.etsy.com/shop/ASturdyStick

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1422 posts in 1934 days


#12 posted 03-12-2018 03:40 PM

I was in the Army back in the day, and we had brass belt buckles. As most might know, the military doesn’t like rust nor oxidation on things. So, the belt buckles were polished to a mirror finish using Brasso, and rust was removed with elbow grease and oil that was supplied, or the rust was removed and the part that had rust was painted. So, if you want, polish your ferrel with Brasso, or paint it, and when the copper starts showing any type of discoloration, polish it again, or remove the existing finish, and refinish it. After awhile, you’ll say, “Screw that crap”, and let nature take it’s course. ............ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2134 posts in 3148 days


#13 posted 03-25-2018 04:28 AM

I use lacquer on my spindle turnings I copper plate.

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