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Staplers for cabinet backs?

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Forum topic by Beginningwoodworker posted 1198 days ago 2805 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2275 days


1198 days ago

I am wondering do staples hold better in cabinet backs? My brad nailer dont hold 1/4’’ plywood to good.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7259 posts in 2249 days


#1 posted 1198 days ago

Crown staples hold very well. Get real short ones – like 5/8”
for cabinet backs. The longer the staples the more potential
for blowout. Same as with brads.

You can “toenail” brads at an angle too. They hold a bit
better that way.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View lew's profile

lew

9951 posts in 2357 days


#2 posted 1198 days ago

CJ,

Ditto what Loren said. The length of the staples will depend on the thickness of the cabinet back but for 1/4”, Loren is right on.

Lew

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2275 days


#3 posted 1198 days ago

I use 1/4’’ plywood for cabinet backs, could I hand nail the cabinet backs?

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Loren's profile

Loren

7259 posts in 2249 days


#4 posted 1198 days ago

Sure. You might try the ring-shank paneling nails if you’re concerned about
the nails pulling out. They’re designed for attaching thin panels to studs.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View patron's profile

patron

12963 posts in 1943 days


#5 posted 1198 days ago

i dado my backs into a grove
in the sides and T&B
about 1/2” in from the back edge
you loose some depth but not enough to matter realy
and the box is clean and strong
just measure good from grove to grovebottom
and cut the panel 1/32 shy of that
i glue it in too
since it is ply
for mounting a 3”strip of 1/2” ply in the inset area behind the back
gives you a place to attach screws for mounting to the walls
without blowing out the back
or french cleats to the uppers so you can move them around if needed later

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1269 days


#6 posted 1198 days ago

This is what I use, from Harbor freight, 30 bucks , on kitchen cabinets
http://www.harborfreight.com/18-gauge-1-4-quarter-inch-crown-air-stapler-97521.html

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13337 posts in 2275 days


#7 posted 1198 days ago

I use a rabbet joint for the 1/4’’ back to sit in. I might try cut brad nails. They have more holding power.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

905 posts in 1292 days


#8 posted 1198 days ago

Wide crown staple 5/8” long, bead of glue.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "finished"!

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1269 days


#9 posted 1198 days ago

Yes I forgot the glue

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View Jerry's profile

Jerry

2163 posts in 2148 days


#10 posted 1198 days ago

Glue and 5/8 staple for us. We also use David’s technique at times.

-- Jerry Nettrour, San Antonio, www.topqualitycabinets.net

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1241 days


#11 posted 1198 days ago

The crown stapler and glue will do you.

If you are in a pinch and only have an 18 gauge brad gun, use 1/2” or 5/8” at most, be sure to turn the pressure down so the brad won’t blow through the luan (or whatever), glue and shoot.

We use this method to attach the finished toe kick veneer on cabinets where we can not use the crown staples. It works just fine as long as the pressure is set correctly.

Also, I personally cannot stand crown staples for trimming door casing (like nearly all the factories do). I order interior doors without trim (and often solid jamb) so we can get it right and leave it smooth for the painter or finisher.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View devann's profile

devann

1735 posts in 1294 days


#12 posted 1198 days ago

Same has David & Jerry. Having a little space between the back of the cabinet and the wall allows for a cleat to be fastened to the wall. This makes for an easier installation to get everything hanging straight. The staples will hold better than the brads because many times you’re penetrating into two grains of the wood instead of one.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View jack1's profile

jack1

1907 posts in 2629 days


#13 posted 1198 days ago

yes in a rabbet

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View Don Newton's profile

Don Newton

712 posts in 2220 days


#14 posted 1197 days ago

Patron and I use the same system, dadoing for the back. I have seen too many installations that have failed by rabbeting the sides for the back. The back stays attached to the wall and the cabinet is on the floor!

-- Don, Pittsburgh

View Loren's profile

Loren

7259 posts in 2249 days


#15 posted 1197 days ago

Wall cabinets I put a 4” wide horizontal at the top back of the cabinet,
inside the back usually. This can be screwed to the top in the regular
way and, if exposed screws on the sides are an issue, use pocket screws,
biscuits or dowels.

The back I usually make a 1/2” deep rabbet on the sides for bottom
cabs and on the sides and bottom for upper cabs. This is kitchen cabinet
stuff, not fine cabinetmaking. I always staple the back in. I don’t always
use glue for the back because I’ll use slick whiteboard material often
and glue doesn’t stick to it except on the edges.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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