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Forum topic by MatthewG posted 04-16-2011 06:13 PM 1374 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MatthewG

74 posts in 2244 days


04-16-2011 06:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: caning seat ladderback refinish

I recently refinished some 80yr old ladderbacks—so far so good. Originally, they had round kraft paper woven “cane” seats. The new seats are done with with flat wood strips, maybe 1/2 wide. The seats look like this:

So what do I finish the seats with? The only recommendation I have so far is 2/3 paint thinner, 1/3 linseed oil.

Any help is appreciated.

Matthew Eash

-- Matthew, from beautiful Wisconsin USA


14 replies so far

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2507 days


#1 posted 04-17-2011 03:19 AM

1) – 2/3 PT and 1/3 Linseed oil
2) – 50/50 PT and BLO
3) – 1/3 BLO, 1/3 PT, and 1/3 Varnish
Are all good combos but I can’t say which one would be best.
Your most durable would be the 3rd combo.
I have never used either for a project like this maybe someone on here has more experience with that type of project.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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fussy

980 posts in 2516 days


#2 posted 04-17-2011 04:39 AM

I agree with wseand. Boiled linseed oil, polyurethane varnish, and paint thinner or turpentine in equal parts. Rag it on, keep it wet for about 5 minutes, wipe it off thoroughly, and let it dry. On a seat like that, it will last forever—unless someone is wearing sandpaper pants. Good job caning the seat, btw.

Steve

-- Steve in KY. 44 years so far with my lovely bride. Think I'll keep her.

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bubinga

861 posts in 2133 days


#3 posted 04-17-2011 06:00 AM

Great job !!!
Would it be better to spray it ????

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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Steven H

1117 posts in 2525 days


#4 posted 04-17-2011 06:21 AM

Oil/varnish blend is fine for this.

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2507 days


#5 posted 04-17-2011 06:40 AM

Bubinga, I am pretty sure the best way is wipe on. But I brush it on for larger pieces. I don’t have a sprayer so can’t do it that way even if I wanted to.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Steven H

1117 posts in 2525 days


#6 posted 04-17-2011 06:55 AM

Problem with spraying is over spray. You will have particles flying over10 feet away and landing on to something. Varnishes takes long to dry, it can get gummy and sticky.

There was a story about someone was spraying their exterior walls. It was also a windy day. When he finish spraying, the neighbors red car is painted white.

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bubinga

861 posts in 2133 days


#7 posted 04-17-2011 07:01 AM

I ask the question ,cause I don’t know. I don’t spray every thing, but I did spray ,all exterior of pole barn ,,no neighbors close
Enquiring minds want to know

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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wseand

2754 posts in 2507 days


#8 posted 04-17-2011 07:15 AM

I think it really depends on what you are using it on. From what I have heard it sucks to spray but really don’t know for a fact.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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bubinga

861 posts in 2133 days


#9 posted 04-17-2011 01:15 PM

Spraying a finish as a lot of advantages, and some disadvantages, but I won’t get into all of that here

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 3210 days


#10 posted 04-17-2011 01:45 PM

I use 50/50 blo and mineral spirits. Really slop it on, so it gets down between the weave. Let it set a few minutes and wipe off all that you can. You should reapply this about once a year to keep the reed pliable.
FYI, this type of seat will not hold up outdoors, so don’t leave these chairs out on a porch, where the moisture can get to them. They will grow mold and it won’t come off.

View Earlextech's profile

Earlextech

1159 posts in 2156 days


#11 posted 04-17-2011 11:38 PM

Overspray is not a problem with HVLP!
HVLP is the most controllable spray system available today, it is meant for trim, furniture, cabinetry, anywhere you want a fine finish.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1117 posts in 2525 days


#12 posted 04-18-2011 02:37 AM

I don’t care what gun it is
HVLP or conventional.
You will always have over spray, just less with HVLP.

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Earlextech

1159 posts in 2156 days


#13 posted 04-18-2011 03:40 PM

3% – 5% overspray as compared to 40%-60% with conventional air or airless systems is worth mentioning.

-- Sam Hamory - The project is never finished until its "Finished"!

View MatthewG's profile

MatthewG

74 posts in 2244 days


#14 posted 04-19-2011 04:26 AM

Thanks everyone for the replies—so I am going with 1/3 boiled linseed oil, 2/3 paint thinner. And thanks for the compliments on the caning—but I cannot take credit for that! I refinished the chairs, and a wonderful husband-of-a-friend-of-my-wonderful-wife did the caning for me. For sure, I will make it worth his while :)

You guys are great—thanks.

-- Matthew, from beautiful Wisconsin USA

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