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Old Leeson Motor

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Forum topic by Floyd Hall posted 02-24-2018 08:29 PM 335 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


02-24-2018 08:29 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tables motors

Hi all,

I’d like to know if this old 1 1/2 hp motor will be an upgrade from my current contractor’s saw motor—a 1/1/2 hp Powermatic 64A. I’ve been involved in several strings where people have said that these older motors will put out more power than the newer ones. Anyway, here’s what I’m looking at buying and there are photos below. The motor plate says it maxes out at 40 amps, but requires only a 30 amp circuit. I currently have a 20 amp circuit breaker that runs 220v.

Here’s the basic info:

Leeson – $75
Model: M6934DB1OC
HP: 1.5
Volts: 115/230
RPM: 3450
Amps: 17.8/8.9
Phase: 1
Cycles: 60
Frame: E56
Code: K

Floyd


13 replies so far

View MrRon's profile (online now)

MrRon

4798 posts in 3272 days


#1 posted 02-24-2018 08:44 PM

That motor looks pretty well used; might need new bearings. I’d pass on it.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2059 posts in 1416 days


#2 posted 02-24-2018 08:49 PM

Not seeing a lot of bang for the buck. As Uncle Jed would say, that Leeson “looks like it was rode hard and put away wet”. Might have to replace bearings or capacitors if they haven’t been replaced recently. Doesn’t look like it was treated like they would have done that. Probably need to see the specs and condition on the current motor for anyone to give a good answer.

Are you having a problem with it that makes you want a new motor?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3676 days


#3 posted 02-24-2018 08:52 PM

I wouldn’t bother. It’s unlikely you’ll get much
more hp from it.

It’s mainly the big oem motors on older machines
that may pack extra muscle for the amp draw
than newer motors. I think the old ones were
just overbuilt on principle and some of them are
repulsion motors, which went out of style due to
the less costly capacitor start motors coming along.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6768 posts in 2227 days


#4 posted 02-24-2018 09:17 PM

If your saw has a 1.5hp motor now, then you aren’t going to get anything extra from the Leeson.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: That motor is listed at 17.8A@120v or 8.9A@240v FLA
What is written on that yellow tape is wrong. Apparently, they confused the MAX AMB (ambient temp) rating for AMP – listed as 40ᵒ C

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


#5 posted 02-24-2018 10:08 PM


Are you having a problem with it that makes you want a new motor?

- Lazyman

Not giving me enough power to make the cuts I need to make.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


#6 posted 02-24-2018 10:10 PM


What is written on that yellow tape is wrong. Apparently, they confused the MAX AMB (ambient temp) rating for AMP – listed as 40ᵒ C

- MrUnix

Yeah, somebody else pointed that out on the OWWM site, where I also posted this.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

11825 posts in 2408 days


#7 posted 02-24-2018 10:37 PM

On the main question, I agree with everyone else. Are the cuts too heavy for a 1.5hp or could something be causing a loss of power? My saw was feeling anemic for awhile and I found a loose wire. Cleaned the terminals, tightened everything up and it ran as good as new. Extension cords and dull blades are also culprits. Rip blades require a lot less power for ripping than crosscut, general purpose, or combo blades. But there are limits to what a 1.5hp saw will cut in 1 pass. Sometimes I cut 1/2 height then make a 2nd pass at full depth especially when ripping and I’m too lazy to switch out the blade for a few cuts.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3676 days


#8 posted 02-24-2018 10:49 PM

If you’re ripping thicker stock thin kerf blades
and lower tooth counts can help.

When people claim they cut 8/4 oak on a contractor
saw “like butter” I roll my eyes.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


#9 posted 02-24-2018 10:49 PM



On the main question, I agree with everyone else. Are the cuts too heavy for a 1.5hp or could something be causing a loss of power? My saw was feeling anemic for awhile and I found a loose wire. Cleaned the terminals, tightened everything up and it ran as good as new. Extension cords and dull blades are also culprits. Rip blades require a lot less power for ripping than crosscut, general purpose, or combo blades. But there are limits to what a 1.5hp saw will cut in 1 pass. Sometimes I cut 1/2 height then make a 2nd pass at full depth especially when ripping and I m too lazy to switch out the blade for a few cuts.

- Woodknack

Been working for months on this. Got two new blades, checked the alignment, put new 220v service and and rewired the saw. Now I’m putting on a new fence face and making zero clearance inserts with splitters. My guess is I’m asking for more than the saw can comfortably do. Problem is I need the mobility of the saw, but I also need it to make better cuts. Right now it struggles with 6/4 hardwoods. It cuts fairly straight, but I get a lot of burn marks. I don’t make these kind of cuts very often, but I have some coming up and I’m very reluctant to go ahead and try them.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


#10 posted 02-24-2018 10:53 PM


If you re ripping thicker stock thin kerf blades
and lower tooth counts can help.

Other than that, when people claim they cut
8/4 oak on a contractor saw “like butter” I
roll my eyes.

- Loren

I’m using Freud industrial thin-kerf blades, one glue line rip and one combo. And, yeah, I love it when people say they can cut 10/4 hardwoods with the 1/4 hp table saw because it’s set up just that perfect.

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Loren

10476 posts in 3676 days


#11 posted 02-24-2018 11:04 PM

A splitter may help.

I’ve made them by making a hardboard insert
with an elongated kerf and “carving” a stick to
glue in the slot behind the blade. Doesn’t have
to be fancy at all, just a little thinner than the
blade kerf.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


#12 posted 02-25-2018 12:22 AM



A splitter may help.

I ve made them by making a hardboard insert
with an elongated kerf and “carving” a stick to
glue in the slot behind the blade. Doesn t have
to be fancy at all, just a little thinner than the
blade kerf.

- Loren

I bought the MJ Splitter Steel Pro kit, with their almost unintelligible setup directions. The problem with that is the plastic jig for drilling the holes will probably go out of alignment after an insert or two, meaning I have to go back and buy another one for $30. Or maybe I should just make my own splitter, which means another 2-3 hours of YouTube videos. And I am sick of YouTube videos. Especially the background music. Really they should use that stuff on the poor idiots at Guantanamo. Am I frustrated? Yes, I am.

View Floyd Hall's profile

Floyd Hall

118 posts in 299 days


#13 posted 02-26-2018 08:19 PM

Anyway, folks, I decided to pass on the motor. Gonna just wait and buy a big boy saw when I get the chance.

Floyd

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