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Hand Tool Forensics #3 - We Have a Winner!

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Forum topic by Ron Aylor posted 02-24-2018 08:01 PM 944 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 853 days


02-24-2018 08:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: hand tool handtool methods of work forensics mechanisms of injury

Third installment of Hand Tool Forensics . See if you can identify the operation and hand tool that produced this waste. Akin to mechanisms of injury. Seeing an end result and determining the cause.
 
What was I doing, and with what?
 


21 replies so far

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1165 posts in 1114 days


#1 posted 02-24-2018 08:33 PM

Cutting tenons by hand with a chisel…or creating a miniature replica stack of firewood for a doll’s house.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Lazyman

2644 posts in 1593 days


#2 posted 02-24-2018 08:51 PM

Cutting a hinge mortise.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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John

245 posts in 1787 days


#3 posted 02-24-2018 09:08 PM

I had similar waste installing a half mortise lock.

-- I measured once, cut twice, and its still too short...

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 853 days


#4 posted 02-24-2018 09:29 PM

ALL good guesses but, no!

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ToolingAround

10 posts in 636 days


#5 posted 02-24-2018 09:36 PM

whittling with a a pocket knife or similar.

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Woodknack

12431 posts in 2585 days


#6 posted 02-24-2018 09:42 PM

The ends were sawn and waste removed with a chisel. The waste gets finer as you get closer to size. There are also crumbs that I would guess come from chopping end grain. Some of the pieces appear triangular. My first thought was dovetails but the angled waste could just be chisel angle.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Mike54Ohio's profile

Mike54Ohio

177 posts in 684 days


#7 posted 02-24-2018 09:43 PM

wood fragments are consistent in width-some type of set width blade either a chisel or scrub plane maybe?

Fragments aren’t curly enough for scrub plane though.

Not sure for my guess

-- It's only a dumb question if you ignore the correct answer

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2867 posts in 787 days


#8 posted 02-24-2018 09:49 PM

Cutting a dado (or rabbet) cross-grain? Kerfing plane and chisel, if I know you.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View Johnalan Thomas's profile

Johnalan Thomas

57 posts in 1100 days


#9 posted 02-25-2018 12:10 AM

Cleaning up a tennon with a router plane although, those seem very wide to be a router plane.

-- John Darlington Sc

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Ripper70

1165 posts in 1114 days


#10 posted 02-25-2018 12:20 AM

You used a small whisk broom to clean out the bathroom sink after your pet beaver was done flossing his teeth?

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 853 days


#11 posted 02-25-2018 12:22 AM


Cutting a dado (or rabbet) cross-grain? Kerfing plane and chisel, if I know you.

- Dave Polaschek

DING, DING, DING … we have a winner! Yes Dave, I was cutting cross-grain dados with a chisel.
 

 
Didn’t use the kerfing plane … I just free handed a backsaw this time!
 

 

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Dave Polaschek

2867 posts in 787 days


#12 posted 02-25-2018 01:09 AM

I did almost the exact same thing putting the uprights into my file till just last week, so the leftovers looked familiar. And I free-handed a backsaw as well. Cutting all the slots for all the files gave me a lot of practice sticking to my line.

Edit to add: the chunks were too thick for a dado plane, which was my first thought, but I’m pretty sure you don’t use one of those very often.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

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Ripper70

1165 posts in 1114 days


#13 posted 02-25-2018 02:39 AM



Cutting a dado (or rabbet) cross-grain? Kerfing plane and chisel, if I know you.

- Dave Polaschek


Dang! That’s one heck of a good call, Dave!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 853 days


#14 posted 02-25-2018 11:23 AM



You used a small whisk broom to clean out the bathroom sink after your pet beaver was done flossing his teeth?

- Ripper70

Now that’s  funny but, no!

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 853 days


#15 posted 02-25-2018 11:26 AM



I did almost the exact same thing putting the uprights into my file till just last week, so the leftovers looked familiar. And I free-handed a backsaw as well. Cutting all the slots for all the files gave me a lot of practice sticking to my line.

Edit to add: the chunks were too thick for a dado plane, which was my first thought, but I’m pretty sure you don’t use one of those very often.

- Dave Polaschek

I had a feeling you would get this one. I find it easier just to chop out the waste with a chisel when cutting dados. I will use a rebate plane on rebates, though.

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