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Need Advice on how to fix this, Please.

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Forum topic by tjm5711 posted 02-24-2018 04:10 PM 639 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tjm5711

5 posts in 208 days


02-24-2018 04:10 PM

Would love some advice on how to get this wood simply back in place.

This is a game-used bat, just for display.

Thanks !


12 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2386 posts in 1503 days


#1 posted 02-24-2018 04:27 PM

You might just have to completely break it off and then you can just use some wood glue and clamps to reassemble it.

On the other hand, a broken bat usually has a much more interesting story so perhaps just displaying like it is makes it more interesting?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3764 days


#2 posted 02-24-2018 04:27 PM

You could try clamping down the ends over
a fulcrum to bend the bat enough to clamp
the splintered piece in place.

If that doesn’t work I think you’ll need to
split to whole piece off, which may be difficult,
cut it off, which may get ugly, or remove
material from the end of the broken piece.

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

482 posts in 2331 days


#3 posted 02-24-2018 04:33 PM

First off, I don’t think there is any practical way to get that split closed up without it still being obvious the bat was damaged. And there is absolutely no way I would try and close that split with the intention of ever hitting a ball again.

But if the goal is to get it closed to use as the bat as something mounted on a board or other purpose, then there are a couple of ways to do so, more or less successfully.

1. The simple: Using a pair of small needle nose pliers or heavy tweezers, reach in the split where you can and pull out any of the splinters you can get too as close to their base as you can. You can use a combination of a knife and tweezers to work them out. Drive a small wedge into the split to stabilize it and then use a small saw or the knife to trim off the parts of the split piece that stick out and are keeping it from closing up. You should be able to close the split so it’s not that noticeable.

2. The hard: Start the same way by removing any of the splinters inside the split you can. Then in order to close the split without trimming the end, you will have to actually flex the bat enough to create enough bend so you can work the split closed without too much trimming. You could use a piece of 4×4 with some ratchet straps and 2×4 spacers to help create the bend. But I give this about a 50/50 chance of actually working very well, so my recommendation is to go with method #1 above.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2386 posts in 1503 days


#4 posted 02-24-2018 04:53 PM

I think that you will get the cleanest glue line if you just completely break it off and glue it back together. This is actually a technique that I have seen used intentionally. The resulting seam after gluing it back together is almost impossible to see without close inspection. Since the break mostly runs along the grain it will continue to split until it comes apart. As long as no splinters are missing (save any that come off while splitting), the glue joint will be nearly invisible, especially if you use a light colored glue such as Elmer’s carpenter wood glue (not the one label “Max” or any others that have a brownish color). A white wood glue would be even better. Just clean off any squeeze-out before it dries.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Rich's profile (online now)

Rich

3524 posts in 705 days


#5 posted 02-24-2018 05:03 PM

Since it’s display only, why not display it as-is? It’s kind of cool looking and folks will assume it broke when you knocked the game-winning grand slam home run out of the park.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2583 posts in 1015 days


#6 posted 02-24-2018 05:15 PM

Fill it with glue, then your going to have to bend the bat enough to pop in the piece that is sticking out.
Then clean off all the squeezed out glue and clamp it. your probably going to have to place the bat, on something you can clamp to, with the bent curve facing up so you can clamp it down to straighten out the curve.

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a1Jim

117203 posts in 3693 days


#7 posted 02-24-2018 06:40 PM

+1 Jbay

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10262 posts in 3149 days


#8 posted 02-25-2018 01:41 AM



Fill it with glue, then your going to have to bend the bat enough to pop in the piece that is sticking out.
Then clean off all the squeezed out glue and clamp it. your probably going to have to place the bat, on something you can clamp to, with the bent curve facing up so you can clamp it down to straighten out the curve.

- jbay

What jbay said!

Rick

-- It is not necessary for Some People to turn OFF the LIGHT to be IN the DARK!

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

466 posts in 3310 days


#9 posted 02-25-2018 03:03 AM

If you can steam it or soak in very hot water it might bend a little easier.

View Rick S.'s profile

Rick S.

10262 posts in 3149 days


#10 posted 02-25-2018 03:05 AM



If you can steam it or soak in very hot water it might bend a little easier.

- Jeff in Huntersville

Steaming is a Good Idea Jeff! Huntsville EH? Fished that area many times.

Rick

-- It is not necessary for Some People to turn OFF the LIGHT to be IN the DARK!

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1025 posts in 1655 days


#11 posted 02-25-2018 03:06 AM



If you can steam it or soak in very hot water it might bend a little easier.

- Jeff in Huntersville

Was going to suggest this as well. Most wood (I suspect) are pliable when wet enough. Get it back in place and let it dry. Since it’s for display, you really don’t need to glue it back.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1115 posts in 2068 days


#12 posted 02-25-2018 03:43 AM

I have to agree with Rich. Why not leave it as it is for display. A whole bat is just another whole bat. A broken bat has another story to tell. Perhaps it was not broken when in use for the event you wish to commemorate but at a later date. You could display it as is with a plaque detailing the commemorative event and then adding information of just how the bat met its final demise. Something like “The bat used for TJM’s record breaking three in one game home runs, July 4, 2017. Lost in battle to a foul ball August 12, 2018”.

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