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Forum topic by chickenhawk posted 02-22-2018 02:48 PM 647 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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chickenhawk

5 posts in 210 days


02-22-2018 02:48 PM

I am making a 48”x99” edge grain walnut island. I milled my rough cut lumber starting with a bunch of 2×6s on the jointer then the planer. I planed to 1.25” thick, then started ripping 1.5” sticks on the table saw. My plan has been to glue face grain to get a top that is 1.5” thick and the strips would be 1.25 wide. This was all going smoothly till I started ripping and my perfectly square boards naturally got a bit our of square as they turned into 1.25×1.5 strips. I should have seen this coming.

I am hoping to not use dowels or biscuits as I haven’t read enough evidence that convenses me that they add enough strength to make all the extra work worth is. I am planning to just face glue 9” wide sections using cauls then send them through the planer. I am not thrilled that I have to clamp so tight to get the boards to mate up, but they simply are not dead flat after ripping the boards.

Is it ok to continue with my plan or should I run all the individual stips across the jointer then back through the planer, likely leading to 1” wide strips as opposed to 1.25”? This would likely give me a better mating surface for glue up and I sure as hell don’t want this island to split, but it’s also a lot of extra work and I’ll loose some waste.

Thanks for the advice.


12 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5048 posts in 4076 days


#1 posted 02-22-2018 03:15 PM

Have you checked the moisture of the wood? That can sure cause some warping. Also, internal stress can be released after the wood is cut.
What glue will you use?
More details will help us help you.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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chickenhawk

5 posts in 210 days


#2 posted 02-22-2018 03:48 PM

Moister is around 6% so that should be good. I will be using titebond III. I am sure it was the internal stress released when I ripped the boards. Really the question is do I clamp and glue or do I re-mill to get all perfectly mating surfaces?

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jbay

2583 posts in 1015 days


#3 posted 02-22-2018 04:09 PM

What is your interpretation of out of square? You mean the warped?
Pieces should still be square unless you had problems cutting.

Your mating surfaces (the faces) should still be flat from planing. Although warped, I think gluing and clamping should bring them together fine.

Post a few picks and it will be easier to help.

I would continue on, but it just depends on how bad they are.

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chickenhawk

5 posts in 210 days


#4 posted 02-22-2018 09:40 PM

You are correct in that it’s more a challenge up for warping. I to think I should be fine to glue and clamp but I’ve got a lot into this top already and want someone with a bit more experience thank myself to reassure me. The warping isn’t that bad. Here a pic of the boards laid out without being clamped.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3764 days


#5 posted 02-22-2018 09:44 PM

I think you’ll be fine. You may want to use
a dark glue. It will look better if there are
any gaps.

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

939 posts in 1557 days


#6 posted 02-22-2018 10:18 PM

You’ll be fine. The glue will handle the warping of the strips. Use cauls to keep it all flat while the glue sets up.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

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chickenhawk

5 posts in 210 days


#7 posted 02-22-2018 11:12 PM

That’s what I was hoping to hear

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jbay

2583 posts in 1015 days


#8 posted 02-22-2018 11:20 PM

Pffft, that’s nothin.

Worst case scenario would be to glue up your 9” sections, then if you have to, run them through the jointer to straighten them up before gluing the sections together.

They look straight enough to me that I doubt you would have to do that though.

Throw a long clamp across them (dry) and see how much pressure it takes to close them up.
I don’t think it will take much. This will give you a good idea.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2386 posts in 1503 days


#9 posted 02-22-2018 11:32 PM

That is pretty long and wide. How many long clamps do you have?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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chickenhawk

5 posts in 210 days


#10 posted 02-22-2018 11:55 PM

I’ve probably got 6-8 pipe clamps. I’ll also run a few cauls. I do plan to do sections that can run through the planer.

View fuigb's profile

fuigb

502 posts in 3073 days


#11 posted 02-23-2018 10:45 AM

Agree re: dry run on the clamping. I’ve been working on a hardwood lam bench-top and it doesn’t take much to bring apparently out-of-true boards into tight alignment. My advice: if you have to do any appreciable amount of reefing with your clamps then rejoint the offending stock.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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Lazyman

2386 posts in 1503 days


#12 posted 02-23-2018 02:26 PM


I ve probably got 6-8 pipe clamps. I ll also run a few cauls. I do plan to do sections that can run through the planer.

- chickenhawk

My concern is with how narrow the individual boards are. With that few clamps along such a long piece, you may have some zones that don’t get good pressure, especially near the edges. You can mitigate that by using some wide cauls to help spread out the clamping pressure on the first joint or two. This Fine Woodworking article explains what I mean.

BTW, biscuits are not really so much for strengthening the joint. Their primary purpose is for keeping things aligned during the glue up so you don’t have to worry as much about the boards slipping out of alignment. This is especially true with so many boards in the glue up. By the time you get the last one in place and are ready to apply clamps, even in 12” wide sections, the first glue may already be starting to grab and make alignment more difficult. They will definitely help minimize how much planing you will have to do after glue up so might actually save time, not to mention wood.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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