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Forum topic by BoardButcherer posted 02-21-2018 07:32 PM 1979 views 0 times favorited 34 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


02-21-2018 07:32 PM

Oi, it’s me. The guy with too many questions.

I’m just starting to put a shop together and the first thing I did was buy a 3 phase converter and an industrial Sawstop cabinet saw that was going cheap at auction because it had been in a fire at a school.

Why not jump into a quagmire with 2 feet if you’ve got too much free time and a tool fetish, right?

So I already knew the saw had been liberally soaked in the fire by the sprinklers before buying it and had made up my mind to break it down, clean it up and put it back together. That’s fine. Table saws are easy compared to some of the machines I’ve overhauled.

However this is taking longer than expected, and it’s largely my fault. When I got the saw it was slammed full of sawdust in every conceivable nook, cranny and bolt-hole because the shop teacher had unhooked the dust collection, which I can guarantee is what started the fire at that school after seeing what I’ve seen (If you’ve got kids taking shop classes at their school I’d ask to take the tour and do a good inspection of every machine there. The only excuse for the lack of maintenance throughout this machine was plain idiocy combined with incompetence, seasoned liberally with laziness) So now I’ve got a healthy paranoia of dust build-up and in the process of re-painting every piece of the saw, inside and out, I’m trying to find ways to lubricate everything without attracting dust.

I’ve got the shafts taken care of, I’m making gaskets to keep in some thick grease and keep dust out. The open gears, trunion slides and other friction points aren’t so easy though. I’m trying to find some dry lube that will soak into/get pressed into the cast iron and steel to keep things working smooth, and also keep the rust out.

I’m in Florida. Rust is a fact of life, AC or no AC. Sometimes the humidity is so thick it overpowers the climate control. There will be condensation.

So I’ve got a can of dry moly and a can of teflon spray. Both work great for reducing friction but don’t even slow down the rust. It just creeps in under the moly.

Anyone know of a rust inhibitor that can be put in the slides, trunions and gears that will last a reasonable amount of time? Can’t have any build-up or thick coating. No oils or grease, wax or paste. Need something I can rub in, buff out and pretend it isn’t there.


34 replies so far

View Jeff Bremer's profile

Jeff Bremer

14 posts in 214 days


#1 posted 02-21-2018 07:49 PM

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5069 posts in 2611 days


#2 posted 02-21-2018 08:27 PM

I’ve used Johnsom’s paste wax for that, put in with a toothbrush. Then clean it up with another toothbrush. Works pretty well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


#3 posted 02-21-2018 08:30 PM



I m not an expert, so these suggestions may be way off-base:

Boeshield T9 – https://www.amazon.com/BOESHIELD-Corrosion-Protection-Waterproof-Lubrication/dp/B001447PEK/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1519242363&sr=8-2&keywords=boshield+t-9

Dyna Glide Plus – https://woodworker.com/dynaglide-plus-lube-spray-cleaner-14-oz-mssu-171-203.asp

HTH, Jeff

- Jeff Bremer

The Boeshield I’ve looked at. I decided not to try it because it says it leaves a waxy finish. Any waxy finish is going to get dust embedded in it by the moving parts and there will be a material buildup.

The Dyna Glide, however, I have not come across and sounds like it may work. I’d need to ask some questions from someone has used it though. Dynaglide is a trademarked name for the application of PTFE as a bearing material. It’s another Teflon spray, so it’s a matter of what they’ve added as a rust preventative that my current can of Blaster Teflon spray doesn’t have.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6887 posts in 2316 days


#4 posted 02-21-2018 08:40 PM

The Boeshield I ve looked at. I decided not to try it because it says it leaves a waxy finish. Any waxy finish is going to get dust embedded in it by the moving parts and there will be a material buildup.
- BoardButcherer

T-9 is just paraffin wax and mineral oil in mineral spirits. It’s the mineral oil that leaves the residue and attracts dust, not the wax. Johnsons paste wax is paraffin and a couple other waxes in a solvent carrier (naptha). The main ingredient in all of them is wax, particularly paraffin. You can get some Gulf wax (paraffin) at the local store for a couple bucks a pound and use it straight. Works well and won’t attract dust. Other dry-lube products will work as well, such as PB Blaster, and most use teflon as their main ingredient. None of the dry lubes do much in the way of rust prevention.

I have a few machines that live outside on a covered patio. Paste wax and a good breathable cover keeps them rust free year around. Don’t overthink it.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


#5 posted 02-21-2018 09:03 PM


The Boeshield I ve looked at. I decided not to try it because it says it leaves a waxy finish. Any waxy finish is going to get dust embedded in it by the moving parts and there will be a material buildup.
- BoardButcherer

T-9 is just paraffin wax and mineral oil in mineral spirits. It s the mineral oil that leaves the residue and attracts dust, not the wax. Johnsons paste wax is paraffin and a couple other waxes in a solvent carrier (naptha). The main ingredient in all of them is wax, particularly paraffin. You can get some Gulf wax (paraffin) at the local store for a couple bucks a pound and use it straight. Works well and won t attract dust. Other dry-lube products will work as well, such as PB Blaster, and most use teflon as their main ingredient. None of the dry lubes do much in the way of rust prevention.

I have a few machines that live outside on a covered patio. Paste wax and a good breathable cover keeps them rust free year around. Don t overthink it.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

I’ll give JPW a try after I buff in some of the moly to give the parts some extra wear protection. I’ve already been using JPW on the table tops and as such know how well it works, just didn’t like the idea of having anything that the sawdust could be trapped in, but from what you and Fred are saying that doesn’t happen. Or it at least isn’t so bad that I’ve got to worry about things like the worm gear getting clogged.

The gears on that were half-filled with hard packed sawdust that just about had to be chiseled out when I tore it down, combined with thick bearing or axle grease of some variety.

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TheFridge

10100 posts in 1604 days


#6 posted 02-21-2018 09:48 PM

I regularly get condensation in my shop. JPW has handled it well.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Lazyman

2386 posts in 1505 days


#7 posted 02-22-2018 04:35 AM

I don’t think wax is the best thing for lubricating gears and shafts. It is not really intended as a lubricant. Sawstop manual says to periodically remove built up dust from internal gears and threaded shafts with a wire brush and reapply a good quality, non-hardening grease. Using dust collection will help reduce the build up. I know it is a pain but if they were designed to be greased, that is what I would use.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


#8 posted 02-22-2018 01:33 PM



I don t think wax is the best thing for lubricating gears and shafts. It is not really intended as a lubricant. Sawstop manual says to periodically remove built up dust from internal gears and threaded shafts with a wire brush and reapply a good quality, non-hardening grease. Using dust collection will help reduce the build up. I know it is a pain but if they were designed to be greased, that is what I would use.

- Lazyman

I won’t be using wax for the lubricant, I’ve got dry lubes for that and they work well, I’ve used them in many other situations with great success. The wax is the rust inhibitor.

High maintenance isn’t stopping me from using the grease either. Grease is just bad in any dusty environment. Doesn’t matter if it’s in your home shop or down in the bottom of a strip mining pit. It doesn’t just draw dust to the parts that’re greased but the surfaces around it, and is especially bad on porous surfaces like cast steel that wick grease.

I’ll be putting the dry lube on twice as often as I would grease, but I’ll be cleaning the gears once every blue moon in comparison and the machine should last longer as a result.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3069 posts in 1598 days


#9 posted 02-22-2018 03:29 PM

I would be a bit concerned about the electronics if the saw was drenched in water.

Does it run?

I use white lithium grease….......but then again I can’t remember if I’ve ever even lubed my tablesaw in 15 years…...

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


#10 posted 02-22-2018 05:09 PM



I would be a bit concerned about the electronics if the saw was drenched in water.

Does it run?

I use white lithium grease….......but then again I can t remember if I ve ever even lubed my tablesaw in 15 years…...

- rwe2156

I actually broke it down before ever plugging it in, didn’t want to risk damaging something.

It will run when I’m done with it, bad electronics or not. Every board is available as a replacement part if I’m feeling lazy. If I’m not, I’ve got a soldering iron and accounts with digikey and mouser. It’s not a terribly complicated system.

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Planeman40

1239 posts in 2878 days


#11 posted 02-23-2018 03:51 PM

WD-40 was developed back in the early days of the space program to prevent rust on fine machines parts in the Cape Canaveral area. It is designed to wick down into the pores of the metal and force out moisture. Most people don’t realize this and think it is just a thin lubricant. I have been using WD-40 to coat my machines and tools for the past 50 years. I spry it on, let it sit overnight, then wipe it off, allowing it time to do it job. It leaves an invisible film that lasts a long time and does not affect the wood passing over it. I periodically spray down my machines and tools (including metal lathes and milling machines) and they all look close to new with no rust after all these years. live in Atlanta, GA which is very humid, but no salt air, thank God! Go to the WD-40 website and read up on it.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


#12 posted 02-23-2018 05:32 PM



WD-40 was developed back in the early days of the space program to prevent rust on fine machines parts in the Cape Canaveral area. It is designed to wick down into the pores of the metal and force out moisture. Most people don t realize this and think it is just a thin lubricant. I have been using WD-40 to coat my machines and tools for the past 50 years. I spry it on, let it sit overnight, then wipe it off, allowing it time to do it job. It leaves an invisible film that lasts a long time and does not affect the wood passing over it. I periodically spray down my machines and tools (including metal lathes and milling machines) and they all look close to new with no rust after all these years. live in Atlanta, GA which is very humid, but no salt air, thank God! Go to the WD-40 website and read up on it.

- Planeman40

No thanks. I’ve worked with heavy steel and sheet metal for over a decade and used just about every oil based lube in a can known to man. WD-40 is definitely close to the bottom of the totem pole. If I was going to use a wet lube I’d break out my can of Kroil or Buster and call it a day.

In the shop I’ve been working in a can of buster will last as long as 6 cans of WD-40, and you’ll still have rust using the WD-40. There’s just no point in even comparing them.

Note that I said Buster, not Blaster. It’s not an off-the-shelf lube.

To be quite honest, if I was going to use your method I wouldn’t even use Buster. Good old fashioned Type III transmission fluid penetrates better and lasts longer. Wipe it on, leave it overnight and wipe it off. You’ve got several weeks of trouble-free use.

However the point of using a dry lube is that it’s dry. I don’t have to wipe it down. I don’t have to clean up spots that I missed later. I don’t have to worry about overspray when I’m trying to get the back side of the screw on the trunnion. If I miss the first couple squirts, that isn’t going to turn into a ball of dust cancer next month.

On my table I’ll use whatever I want. It’s easy to maintain. Inside the machine there are a lot of areas that I can’t clean without breaking it down, and I’m only pulling this table saw apart once every 20 years or so, if I have my druthers, unless something catches on fire.

I don’t know what kind of saw you’ve been using for 50 years but there are parts on the Sawstop that users aren’t meant to maintain, and are designed in a manner that they can easily fail. They want you to come back to the dealer after a few years. Prime examples are the load-bearing flat ball bearing that’s un-lubricated and open to dust and moisture intrusion around one of the sliding vertical shafts and the sliding elbow joint comprised of 4 different types of metal that was already showing signs of galvanic corrosion even though I know the saw is only a year old.

I can’t put wet lube on these. It’d just cause more problems than leaving them completely dry. I also can’t access them while the saw is together without doing some gymnastics my 90lb Guatemalan friend once taught me, a bendy straw and a very unmanly squeak.

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Planeman40

1239 posts in 2878 days


#13 posted 02-23-2018 05:46 PM

You obviously didn’t read my post. I was talking about rust prevention, NOt lubrication! In fact I said “Most people don t realize this and think it is just a thin lubricant.” You seem to be one of them.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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BoardButcherer

144 posts in 212 days


#14 posted 02-23-2018 05:58 PM



You obviously didn t read my post. I was talking about rust prevention, NOt lubrication! In fact I said “Most people don t realize this and think it is just a thin lubricant.” You seem to be one of them.

- Planeman40

Didn’t miss it at all. An oil rust preventative is a lubricant, and an oil lubricant is a rust preventative. One begets the other, such is the magic of oil and that’s why I often don’t care about interchanging the terms.

Point still stands. The WD-40 won’t last long as a rust preventative before I have to re-apply it. There are some areas that I can’t re-apply it without disassembling the saw. JPW will last quite a while if I do it right.

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Woodknack

12331 posts in 2498 days


#15 posted 02-23-2018 07:27 PM



WD-40 was developed back in the early days of the space program to prevent rust on fine machines
- Planeman40

This. It also performs well in tests.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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