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Stanley No 8 type 11 - Score and Question

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 02-21-2018 04:03 AM 733 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2199 days


02-21-2018 04:03 AM

Topic tags/keywords: hand plane restore paint jappaning

I was out looking around Ebay, and happened across an auction for this No 8 type 11. I have been lusting for a No 8 for some time, but didn’t want to spend a lot of money on one. So I put a bid in and landed it for what I consider to be a great price. The plane was said to be all original and in great shape. It arrived as advertsed…at leastt mostly.

I think this had been restored once in its life. I am not savvy enough to tell japanning apart from paint by eye. What do your more trained eyes think? I think the fact that the black paint is on the top (thin) edge of the sides gives it away. I thought the original paint jobs were only on the inside surface of the body. Correct?

The rest of the parts appear to be correct for the vintage. The only negative is that the blade is too badly pitted to be saved. The back under the chip breaker is shot. The chip breaker itself is pretty rough too. So I will need a new blade there. Probably try a Lee Valley this time. All together though, I still got it for what I consider a great price.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


15 replies so far

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TheFridge

10752 posts in 1689 days


#1 posted 02-21-2018 04:18 AM

Looks painted.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

15701 posts in 2822 days


#2 posted 02-21-2018 05:54 AM

Yep, I’d say painted as well. But looks to be good otherwise. How’s the mouth?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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Don W

19017 posts in 2771 days


#3 posted 02-21-2018 11:24 AM

I’d say painted too. A little sand paper to remove it from the edges will do fine.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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fuigb

526 posts in 3161 days


#4 posted 02-21-2018 12:28 PM

OP bought it as a user or as a museum piece? If it’s a user and the price truly was good then do the happy dance and to your real-world friends show off the new rod.

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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OSU55

1975 posts in 2193 days


#5 posted 02-21-2018 01:04 PM

What did you pay? Shipping?

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bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2199 days


#6 posted 02-22-2018 03:35 AM

Museum piece or user? Definitely not the former, but I’m not sure about the latter either. Lol! I am sure I will use it, but probably not a lot. I just kinda dig the absurd size of the thing. I pick it up and I feel like I should be in safari clothes standing over the carcass of a recently felled jungle tree, or something. (Going for the big game hunter analogy there, in case you didn’t figure that out :)).

I did try one at an LN event. It was fun. But I don’t do a lot of large scale flattening.

The mouth looks good. There is some discoloration but it is smooth. Still need to check the bed for flatness.

I paid $77 for the plane, plus $22 for shipping. I have not seen one locally for less than that, even if covered in rust. And some of the ones at antique malls in decent condition were going for 2x that price. I’ll have to pay $40 or so for a blade, but even with that it’s a decent deal in my book.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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corelz125

568 posts in 1180 days


#7 posted 02-22-2018 10:36 PM

Thats a fair price. the prices do seem to be getting higher and higher for them lately. I agree with you on the whole absurd size thing gives you the same feeling as using a 10lb sledge hammer. is it corrugated?

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Ocelot

2113 posts in 2842 days


#8 posted 02-22-2018 11:37 PM



.... is it corrugated?

- corelz125

I was wondering the same thing. My T 11, No 8 is corrugated. Yours looks a bit nicer.
I bought it to use, but it has not as yet received much use from me.

-Paul

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bandit571

21786 posts in 2887 days


#9 posted 02-23-2018 12:52 AM

This one is a tad older….but has been in use lately…

Making decent shavings, too

Original iron an chipbreaker….smooth sole. Type 7

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2199 days


#10 posted 02-23-2018 03:12 AM

It is corrugated. Sorry for the bad lighting. My no 7 and 5 1/2 are corrugated as well. Are the solid soles advantageous in some way?

I have not had a chance to test lap the bottom yet, but I did hold my precision straight edge up to it and it appears to be pretty flat. Blade and chip breaker on the way, so I can hopefully test it out next week some time.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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jonah

1927 posts in 3502 days


#11 posted 02-23-2018 04:00 AM

The more I see old plane prices rise, the more I feel thankful that I got my #3-#8 planes seven or eight years ago. The most I paid was $50 shipped for my #8. Most were less than $25 shipped.

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BlasterStumps

988 posts in 643 days


#12 posted 02-23-2018 02:21 PM

Brian, that 8 appears to be in good nick. The mouth looks like it hasn’t been messed with. Nice find.
Mike

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2199 days


#13 posted 02-23-2018 03:24 PM

Planes, cars, everything marches with inflation. Supply tightens, more people see the value, the new manufacture stuff gets more costly…. Still, paying 25-30% of new for the old iron is a good deal.

I am ready to use this bad boy! Just need UPS/Lee Valley to hurry up and get the blade here.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

15701 posts in 2822 days


#14 posted 02-23-2018 04:24 PM

8s are a joy to use. Bigger is better when it comes to jointing edges of long stock. Once in motion, it tends to stay in motion. Of course, pieces that are shorter don’t need the heft the 8 provides, so it has it’s place.

Corrugated was supposed to have an advantage over solid soles: less friction. All the dialog I’ve seen on that subject is inconclusive. The 8 in my till is a C model as well. Love it.

We had fun with the 8 in the epic thread years ago:

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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corelz125

568 posts in 1180 days


#15 posted 02-23-2018 08:26 PM

its a lot easier to flatten a corrugated 8 than it is flattening a solid sole

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