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Forum topic by AndyDC posted 04-14-2011 04:40 PM 1903 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AndyDC

5 posts in 1254 days


04-14-2011 04:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: carving milling refurbishing finishing scrollworking veneering

New to this site, and needing help!

I’m new to cabinet work. I’m an electronics guy who really needs help with this project.

I bought a Sparton 101 radio phono console built in 1928. There is damage to the ornamental molding on one corner, some small chips to the claw feet, and a small chunk of wood that was knocked off in the rear left top. All of this was done while moving this heavy unit before I got it.

How do I proceed? Can the moldings be repaired, or do new pieces need to be milled?

Do I post the damage photos on here first?

Like i said above, I’m lost with this stuff. I hope someone can help me. I’m not even sure I’m posting this question in the right place…

Thank you.

Andy


7 replies so far

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wseand

2248 posts in 1696 days


#1 posted 04-14-2011 05:36 PM

Depending on the damage you may need to replace the molding. To give a more informed answer I would post some pics.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Loren

7556 posts in 2302 days


#2 posted 04-14-2011 08:16 PM

If you have the broken parts, usually small pieces that break off can
be glued back on, using masking tape for clamp pressure. Delicate
“short grain” wood details often break in old furniture pieces.

While stripping the broken parts off and trying to make new ones is
a legit approach, it often undermines the value of the original piece.

You can carve replacement chips from a wood-like materials and paint
to match as well. Thompson’s water putty, for example. can be pressed
into holes, carved to match, and faux-painted for acceptable repairs to
many pieces.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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AndyDC

5 posts in 1254 days


#3 posted 04-15-2011 12:29 AM

Here is one picture of the corner damage. The molding above the damage comes off, and I will try to post a second picture with that molding removed. I’m still learning how to navigate this site.

Thanks.

Andy

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AndyDC

5 posts in 1254 days


#4 posted 04-15-2011 12:31 AM

I’m looking for another photo

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AndyDC

5 posts in 1254 days


#5 posted 04-15-2011 12:32 AM

Here is another picture

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AndyDC

5 posts in 1254 days


#6 posted 04-15-2011 12:34 AM

As I think you can see (?), the molding with the leaf pattern comes off to reveal the broken corner piece underneath. It is “L” shaped with a rounded edge, and that rounded edge is “scored” down the middle.

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wseand

2248 posts in 1696 days


#7 posted 04-19-2011 05:18 AM

If you can get the profile of the broken piece, you could probably duplicate it. It looks like it is covered by the Leaf pattern molding so it wouldn’t need to be perfect. It doesn’t look like the whole piece is broken just the end. So you would only have to fabricate a small piece. You would have to cut the broken part off relatively square. And make the replicated piece to fit. Glue it in place, hold it down til it cures. Get the profile of the broken piece and try to fabricate prior to cutting the old out. Hope that explained it well enough.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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