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Picture frames - amatorski methods

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Forum topic by niki posted 03-15-2008 10:46 PM 1216 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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niki

426 posts in 2733 days


03-15-2008 10:46 PM

Good day

My wife ordered another 3 picture frames (I made 2 a few days ago) and I decided to take a few pics so you can see my “Amatorski” working methods.

Still, I have to make rabbets for the glass and back-cover, and mortise (Well, groove) for loose tenon.

One frame if made of Lauan and the other two, of Oak because…that’s what I found in the garage attic…

The main problem is, that she don’t want me to use any finish or as she said “natural wood” and that makes a little bit of a problem with mistakes so, I hope that all the mistakes will be at the back part of the frame…

Regards
niki

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11 replies so far

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2953 days


#1 posted 03-15-2008 11:15 PM

Another nice picture show Niki.

That wood must not have been totally dry, getting that reaction.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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niki

426 posts in 2733 days


#2 posted 03-15-2008 11:24 PM

Thank you Dick

This Oak board was left here by the guy that made the steps in my house and it’s already 4 years in the garage…

Maybe, it was dried too fast or…I don’t know, but first time that it happens to me.

Regards
niki

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2476 days


#3 posted 03-15-2008 11:49 PM

Niki,

This is a very nice post. But I will be honest with you the blade height makes me nervous (that is of course coming from someone who doesn’t run a guard or riving knife). I do like the feather board. I may have to copy that one, if you don’t mind.

I will be interested in seeing the final product.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2733 days


#4 posted 03-16-2008 12:20 AM

Thank you Scott

My opinion about the blade guard is…

I did not use blade guard for 10 years…and obviously no splitter or riving knife…
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But…
When the guard is not mounted, my main attention goes to the blade because I was afraid to “contact” it…while actually, my main attention should go to the fence to see if the wood (board) is loosing contact with the fence..which in this case, I hit the STOP…impending kickback…

As you noticed on the pics, I made everything that I could just to keep my hand “Far, far and away” from the “Butcher”...

Your most welcome (and you’ll make me to feel good) to copy and improve the “Feeder Rollers”...every cut becomes “one hand operation”.

Sunday, I’m not working because the neighborhood is Christian and I don’t like to act differently…especially, that I have all the week free, so I’m taking a “Day-off”...

Regards
niki

View alanealane's profile

alanealane

365 posts in 2544 days


#5 posted 03-16-2008 03:04 AM

Thanks for the great photo description. You really put a lot of effort into it, mate.
I love the ‘roller’ style feather board…. GENIUS!!

How many horsepower is your saw?? I guess it’s better that the blade stopped rather than throw the board at you.

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

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niki

426 posts in 2733 days


#6 posted 03-16-2008 10:16 AM

Thank you Alanealane

Here we don’t get HP on the nameplate, only Watts.

This TS is consuming 2500W or 3.35 HP but of course as all the HP’s, it is the “Input HP”, the “Output HP is usually 60% of that (1900W).

Regards
niki

View rikkor's profile

rikkor

11295 posts in 2528 days


#7 posted 03-16-2008 12:11 PM

Thanks for the very clear photojournalism.

View Yettiman's profile

Yettiman

161 posts in 2391 days


#8 posted 04-04-2008 10:39 PM

Hi,,

Appoligise if the question is stupid, but why the high blade? I always set the blade so only three teeth show, (just the way I was taught). So, what’s the benifit of a high blade over low blade.

Great post, I just love the effort you make to provide the piccys

-- Keep your tools sharp, your mind sharper and the coffee hot

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2733 days


#9 posted 04-04-2008 11:17 PM

Hi Yettiman

The blade height was a “war” subject in many forums and there are “Low blade” and the “High blade” guys but as I noticed, the majority are the “Low blade for safety” guys but they are also the “No guard” guys, otherwise….what one would care what is the blade height if the blade is covered or guarded.

I’m from the “High blade” and my decision came from some reading, personal experience and observation …

Ian Kirby writes in his book “The accurate table saw”.......”When the blade is high, the cut is at it’s cleanest and most efficient, but there is a lot of exposed blade, perhaps too much for comfort”.

Well, I believe that Ian Kirby “Knows his people” and like Kelly Mehler that also knows that…. “Overall average for woodworkers using the guard on U.S. table saws seems to be around 5 percent.”
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/articledisplay?id=14789

I don’t have a Band saw but I noticed something very interesting….if I want to rip, lets say, 4” thick board on the table saw, I shall need many “horses” – HP…
But a 1HP band saw can do it without much problem…..I think that it’s because of the teeth angle of attack….

You can make an experiment with 1”~1½” thick Oak (or other hard wood)...first time, set the blade low (the gullet above the workpiece) and rip – note the feed power and speed….
Now, set the blade to “full high” and repeat the cut…my observation was that I need less feed power, the feed is faster and if the feed is faster, usually no “burn marks” or very little because the wood does not spend so much time in the blade and the number of teeth involved is smaller than “low blade” as you can see it here
http://www.waterfront-woods.com/Articles/Tablesaw/tablesaw.htm

Not only, but a “high blade” will result in “cooler blade” (less chances for distortion) and of course cooler motor with less time spent to cut the same FB.

Some people clam that high blade will cause more tear-out at the bottom (lower) side of the wood because of the high angle of attack of the teeth that are coming out of the wood, but when I asked “OK, set the blade to full high…rip an 1/2” thick wood…...and now rip a 3” thick wood….what is the difference in the angle of attack in both cases—-non, it’s the same angle….so, maybe we need different blade for each thickness of wood”....that was the point that the conversation ended – no reply…

Just a small note…when one is cutting, say, 1¾” thick wood and setting the blade to 2” (1/4” above the workpiece…..if he is not using blade guard…when the cut is finished…the blade is exposed 2” above the table.
Many accidents happened during this time of the exposed blade or the blade run-down.

In my case, even if I set the blade to 3¼” with the guard on…it’s like I don’t have any blade exposure….unless, I decide to use my fingers as a “Backer board” :-)

By the way…did you noticed that I’m using a 100 teeth blade (Makita) for ripping?....

All the above is only my opinion and I think that one should use the blade height that he feels the most comfortable and safe with.

Regards
niki

View Jim Crockett (USN Retired)'s profile

Jim Crockett (USN Retired)

852 posts in 2387 days


#10 posted 04-07-2008 03:25 AM

Niki, great job and very nice photo show. A question: your single roller ‘featherboard’ – is it spring loaded somehow? I can see how you would get spring pressure with your two-roller device since it is held in the middle and the metal frame will provide the springiness, but can’t see how you would get any spring pressure with the single roller unit.

Jim

-- A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to "The United States of America," for an amount of "up to and including his/her life".

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niki

426 posts in 2733 days


#11 posted 04-07-2008 06:19 AM

Thank you Jim

The single roller “feather board” is not spring loaded.

Under the unit, I made a few holes that I can push a dowel in. The dowel is getting into the miter slot and serves as a pivot.

I just push the unit (the dowel) into the miter slot, adjust the angle and when I start the cut, I’m rotating/pushing the unit counter clock-wise to push the workpiece firmly toward the fence.

It’s the same action/result like you do normally with your left hand but, with the roller, the left hand does not have to move with the workpiece and stays far away from the blade and the blade line…

Regards
niki

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