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Forum topic by Drew posted 1232 days ago 2569 views 6 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Drew

46 posts in 1319 days


1232 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

I am done with sketch up, I cannot deal with the 3-D drawing.

So is there a Program that lets one draw exclusively in 2-d other than busting out pencil and paper?

-- If A equals success, then the formula is, A = X + Y + Z, Where X is work, Y is play, And Z is keep your mouth shut." -Albert Einstein.


35 replies so far

View peterrum's profile

peterrum

135 posts in 1310 days


#1 posted 1232 days ago

Sketchup lets you draw in 2D as well.

-- Carpe Diem

View Greedo's profile

Greedo

467 posts in 1592 days


#2 posted 1232 days ago

i think that in the older cad versions you only draw in 2d.
but 3d is a vast improvement if your asking me! sketchup is by far the most easy to use 2d or 3d program i have used.

and as peter said, you can set sketchup to be in 2d, either by setting the view in paralel projection and then working with the viewport buttons for front, side, up, etc views.

View Yupa4242's profile

Yupa4242

116 posts in 1232 days


#3 posted 1232 days ago

Sketch Up Is a proven tool that works but it has a high learning curve and even for me after months trying to master the basics I get fed up. That was until i bought at Woodcraft a a 2 part DVD Shop Class with Robert W. Lang “Sketch Up For Woodworkers Part1: Getting Started” is the one i own and it has 2 hours of basic intro to this 3d program. Sells for 29.95

The editors at Woodsmith Shop swear by the product and use it’s program to print the SHop Notes books we all love. :)

-- "If the Universe is Infinite, Then all dreams are real."

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1299 days


#4 posted 1232 days ago

Here is a link to Sketch Up For Woodworkers, NOT affiliated with Robert W. Lang
http://sketchupforwoodworkers.com/tutorials/2009/01/29/getting-started-part-1

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View brianlee's profile

brianlee

18 posts in 1232 days


#5 posted 1232 days ago

If I want to draw just 2d, I use Adobe Illustrator. However, if you don’t want to pay the big bucks for Illustrator (or if you can’t get the educator/student discount), there is an open source program called Inkscape that’s not too bad. I have been using Illustrator for about 20 years now and was rather surprised with Inkscape’s capabilities. It even has a few features that Illustrator doesn’t. Open source programs have really come a long way in recent years. The only drawback to Inkscape is that it doesn’t have positioning abilities that Illustrator has. I can position an object using it’s center, edge, corner or vertex with Illustrator, but Inkscape uses only the objects center. That’s a big handicap for Inkscape.
I have nothing against SketchUp. I use it all the time, but since your question was for a dedicated 2d program, I thought I would add my 2cents.

BrianLee

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Drew

46 posts in 1319 days


#6 posted 1232 days ago

Hmmm I will give inkscape a try. if that doesn’t do what I want, time to get my old drafting board.

-- If A equals success, then the formula is, A = X + Y + Z, Where X is work, Y is play, And Z is keep your mouth shut." -Albert Einstein.

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 1299 days


#7 posted 1232 days ago

Thanks , to all , for the info

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View Don Johnson's profile

Don Johnson

611 posts in 1412 days


#8 posted 1232 days ago

If you could bear to have one more try with Sketchup, I would recommend Swamp Road Woodworks tutorials at http://www.srww.com/google-sketchup.htm. They are produced by Joseph P. Zeh, a cabinetmaker, are excellent and show the occasional errors and corrections as he does a working demonstration of how each task is performed on a typical woodworking project. I actually left my PC to download each tutorial so that I could get on with other things, and then view/review the lessons when convenient.

I had also tried Sketchup previously and given up a couple of times, but watching these tutorials enabled me to get the program working well. The breakthrough for me was the idea of making each solid object a component, so that other parts could be drawn and moved without them attaching themselves to something already drawn. Putting the components on their own layers also meant that they could be displayed or hidden as required. The ‘overhead’ in creating components on layers seems tedious at first, but soon becomes second nature and takes only seconds, but gives enormous benefits – in my opinion.

-- Don, Somerset UK, http://www.donjohnson24.co.uk

View David's profile

David

196 posts in 1295 days


#9 posted 1232 days ago

I’ve used Delta Cad a fair amount (http://www.deltacad.com/), it’s easy to use and sounds like it might work for you. Pretty cheap too, you can probably even find it cheaper on ebay.

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

View DLCW's profile

DLCW

522 posts in 1286 days


#10 posted 1232 days ago

Andrew,

I’ve been taking the Swamp Road Woodworks tutorials and they are VERY good. I feel much better about using Sketchup now then I ever did. In addition to Sketchup I use TurboCAD and eCabinets (cabinet design).

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

View ssflyer's profile

ssflyer

10 posts in 1827 days


#11 posted 1231 days ago

Dassault Systems, the makers of SolidEdge, now have an excellent FREE, 2D CAD program. It is called DraftSight. It is available at http://www.3ds.com/products/draftsight/free-cad-software/
Of course, like pretty much any CAD prgram, there is a learning curve.

-- Ron, Pope Valley CA - www.winecountrycustomcarving.com

View woodworksbyjohn's profile

woodworksbyjohn

69 posts in 1323 days


#12 posted 1231 days ago

Don’t laugh but I too have tried various programs through the years and here’s my final solution to it all:

You’ll notice the Vemco arm, left handed at that. I know the advantage of computer programs that allow you to make changes without having to do the drawing all over but for me, drawing the project manually lets me “build it in my mind” which I find saves a lot of time in the shop. Of course, I can’t rotate, add textures and shading, but in the end, this is what works for me.
This desk is made of Andirobe and spalted Maple. The area below is where I keep my reference books. Being able to stand up and work is a big plus for me as well.

-- John Visit my Blog: http://woodworksbyjohn.com

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1863 days


#13 posted 1231 days ago

Just FWIW, I found Sketchup to be painfully easy to learn, but then again I have a LOT of training in drawing, drafting, and computer aided design, and illustration. So it was easy for me… Perhaps you need to take a class or two…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View David's profile

David

196 posts in 1295 days


#14 posted 1231 days ago

For all the people using sketchup, are you using the free or paid version? From what I’ve seen you need to full version to do things like assemblies, drawings, etc, things that I personally couldn’t do without. (http://sketchup.google.com/product/whygopro.html)

Personally I use Pro/Engineer or occasionally solidworks. I have access to both through work so I don’t have to pay the $5k per license. The learning curve would be pretty steep if I didn’t already log 1500 hours a year with them at work.

By far, however, the most useful tool I have is a $2 drafting notebook, doesn’t even require a computer :)

-- Perilous to all of us are the devices of an art deeper than we ourselves possess. --Gandalf the Grey http://davidwahl.org/category/woodworking/

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

849 posts in 1926 days


#15 posted 1231 days ago

I quit on it several times until getting Sketchup for Dummies by Adrian Chopra. Between the book and his online videos I am no at least capable. As Don pointed out “The breakthrough for me was the idea of making each solid object a component” cannot be said enough. I’m going to get the Lang DVD and check out the web links.

John – that is one nice drafting table, but how do you fit “E” size drawings?

Steve.

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