LumberJocks

Help with saw cords

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by pete79 posted 04-12-2011 10:55 PM 3779 views 0 times favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View pete79's profile

pete79

154 posts in 2606 days


04-12-2011 10:55 PM

I’m looking to replace both the power cord (from outlet to switch) as well as the cord that goes from the switch to the motor on my table saw. I wrote down the numbers and other info from the cords, but I’m having trouble searching online for what I need – mostly because I don’t understand what’s written on the existing cords. I’m hoping someone can explain what these numbers and letters mean so that I can seek out the correct cords. Here’s what I have:

Power cord (outlet to saw switch): LL39965 CSA-NRTL/C SJT 105C 14/3 FT2

Switch to Motor: E24642 Type SJT W-A 105C 14/3 LL44397 CSA

What I understand from that is that it’s 14/3 cable, which carries a 15amp load at 120v. I believe the “SJT” and “W-A” may mean something, but I’m lost. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

-- Life is a one lap race.


36 replies so far

View mpatrick's profile

mpatrick

54 posts in 2242 days


#1 posted 04-12-2011 11:27 PM

I’m not sure what w-a is, but SJT is just a designation for use with power tools. You are correct about the 14/3 info. I have just used heavy duty extension cords from the BORG to replace cords on my power tools.

-- Michael...Houston, Texas

View Minorhero's profile

Minorhero

372 posts in 2070 days


#2 posted 04-13-2011 12:21 AM

I’ll echo mpatrick. I have done several machine restores over the past couple of years and it is pretty common to have to replace old power cords. When I replace the cord I simply go buy an extension cord and cut it up for parts. This has several advantages. One you can leave the male part of the plug intact and that way you don’t have to buy a replacement for that part. Two you can decide how long your want your cord. And three you can decide what color you want your cord. I usually go for yellow simply because its high visibility but some folks prefer to hunt down black cords for the original look.

As for what cord you want to buy. Assuming you have a single phase motor (if you don’t know what that is, then trust me you have one) you can go with a 14 gauge cord if you keep its length to under 15 feet. If you want to go further then that (and I usually do) buy a 12 gauge cord.

View DMX512's profile

DMX512

6 posts in 2115 days


#3 posted 04-13-2011 12:55 AM

SJT refers to the outer jacket of the cord and the insulation around the conductors. 14 (gauge) / 3 (conductor) rated at 300volts / 15amps

View Stormin's profile

Stormin

193 posts in 2255 days


#4 posted 04-13-2011 06:38 AM

S= Standard Jacket
J= Junior Service 300 volts or less
T= Thermoplastic Jacket

If the wire had an “O” it would also mean it was oil resistant. If it has a “W” in the line it would also be weather resistant.

-- I started off with nothing I have most of it left

View drewnahant's profile

drewnahant

222 posts in 2554 days


#5 posted 04-13-2011 06:42 AM

Wow, a lot of good info her, I always thought that besides the gauge and number of conductors, that most of the printing was just manufacturer info, like model number, lot number, date code, etc.

View brtech's profile

brtech

904 posts in 2388 days


#6 posted 04-13-2011 04:00 PM

Want more?

LL39965 CSA-NRTL/C SJT 105C 14/3 FT2

CSA/NRTL/C means that The Canadian Standards Organization, which is the Canadian equivalent of UL tested the design of cable and it is approved in the U.S. and Canada. NRTL is Nationally Recognized Test Lab. The /C means it’s also approved for Canada. “Nationally Recognized Test Lab” is an OSHA certified lab. UL used to be the only lab, but now other labs, including CSA can test products.

LL39965 is the CSA File number for this cable, which was given to a company called “DOMTECH”

SJT has been explaned

The 105C is the max temperature rating

14/3 you knew

FT2 means it passed the CSA FT2 flame test (A bunsen burner flame is applied to a horizontal sample for five 15 second applications. The charred portion must not exceed 100mm from end to end, and there shall be no flaming particles dropping from the sample.)

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#7 posted 04-13-2011 04:18 PM

Mind if I hop in here? I have the same issue (need a 20’ 240V/20A cord). Does anyone know if Lowe’s sells the cord by the foot? Or do I have to buy a 20’ extension cord (sounds expensive). Is there any argument against a locking receptacle? sorry for the mini-hijack but it’s kind of on point.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View brtech's profile

brtech

904 posts in 2388 days


#8 posted 04-13-2011 04:52 PM

Yeah, mine does. You might find that the cost is more than the extension cord, and there is that nice molded plug.

Note HF has a 25’ 12 gauge for $15.

View EEngineer's profile

EEngineer

1061 posts in 3079 days


#9 posted 04-13-2011 05:37 PM

Last tool I refurbed was a drill press. In the past, I bought the cord, bought the plug and made up my own new cord for tools. This time, I found that it would cost 2X more to wire my own!

I bought a heavy duty 10 ft extension cord, whacked the plug off of one end and called it a day. The entire extension cord cost only a little more than just the plug.

-- "Find out what you cannot do and then go do it!"

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#10 posted 04-13-2011 05:42 PM

HF to the rescue; I wish I had one nearby. The thought of waiting for the mail to play with my new saw is unappealing. I hope Lowes has a 20’ extension, otherwise, it looks like this will be expensive.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Grandpa's profile

Grandpa

3256 posts in 2141 days


#11 posted 04-13-2011 07:31 PM

WalMart handles tool replacement cords so that is also a possibility. They are not real cheap though. I bought a 25 foot cord with a bonus 10 foot cord in the package from ACE Hardware once and I ended up with double the fun. That was probably a promotional thing around Christmas. It is a green cord.

View pete79's profile

pete79

154 posts in 2606 days


#12 posted 04-13-2011 10:31 PM

Wow – thanks for all the information everyone. This is VERY helpful. Hopefully someone else benefitted from this as well.

-- Life is a one lap race.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#13 posted 04-13-2011 10:55 PM

^I sure did!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2158 days


#14 posted 04-13-2011 11:04 PM

OK, a little more help if I may. I’m looking at the existing cable. It’s terminated in a Cooper three-prong plug that reads 6-15p 15a 250v. The cable is black, flexible, 10’ and reads MSHA AShift 3/c 10 awg 300v water resistant, etc. Is this something I can get a Lowes? I want stranded wire, not solid copper. Is there a way to explain what I want to the Lowes gang or is it a no-brainer that they can handle. I need 15 feet. Is it going to break the bank? Any help appreciated.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View brtech's profile

brtech

904 posts in 2388 days


#15 posted 04-13-2011 11:10 PM

NEMA 6-15P is a 220/240 V plug that looks a lot like a 110V normal plug but has the blades rotated so they are horizontal rather than vertical.

You probably can’t get a cordset, but you can get that plug and wire to go with it.

You tell them you want 12/3 stranded cordage, and bring the plug so you can show them. They may know what NEMA 6-15P is.

showing 1 through 15 of 36 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com