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Reasons not to buy a 9 inch bandsaw?

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Forum topic by InstantSiv posted 02-18-2018 01:34 AM 1002 views 0 times favorited 30 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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InstantSiv

262 posts in 1710 days


02-18-2018 01:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question pine bandsaw milling arts and crafts

Eventually I’d like to get a 14”+ bandsaw but that’s not going to happen in the foreseeable future… so it’s either a 9” or 10”. I’m leaning towards a 9”. Is there enough of a difference between a 9” and 10” that it’s a poor decision to go with a 9”?

I currently have a jigsaw and a diy table that can mount the jigsaw upside down. This setup works fine but I keep wanting a bandsaw every time I use it. If a jigsaw is good enough I would think a 9 inch is good… or is a 10 inch the smarter choice?


30 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1306 posts in 277 days


#1 posted 02-18-2018 02:02 AM

I had a 12” Craftsman for over 30 years and it served me well. (I gave it to my brother).
around 2005, I bought the Delta Shopmaster BS100 9” bandsaw and it works well for
the work that I do. I am not building large projects anymore and is a good saw for the size and money.
look around C/L and you may find a good one for $50 or so.
it is so small and light, you could hang it on the wall out of the way on a hook.
this is the only bandsaw I have had other then the Craftsman so this is the only one I can comment on.
if you could find a 12” table top model for cheap, I would suggest that one over the 9”.
just a note: I do miss the vertical clearance more than the width.

also – you will not have the noise and chattering with a 9/10” bandsaw vs the upside down jigsaw.
I put in the cool blocks simply because that is what I had used before and was satisfied with them.
the Vermont brand blade cuts better than the ones that came with it.
I will give it 4.9 stars simply because of the low vertical clearance.

.

-- some people are like a Slinky - - - pretty much good for nothing. But still make you smile when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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johnstoneb

2999 posts in 2287 days


#2 posted 02-18-2018 02:05 AM

I have the 12” craftsman and a 14” jet. Both good saws. I would be patient and keep watching craigslist. Something will come up. Go with the biggest you can afford.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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knotscott

8120 posts in 3490 days


#3 posted 02-18-2018 05:23 PM

Most of the 9” are small, under powered, have limited capacity, and high vibration. Getting one with a cast iron table helps. I have the 12” Craftsman that has been a decent compromise.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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Woodknack

12329 posts in 2495 days


#4 posted 02-18-2018 05:40 PM

A cheap bandsaw is better than no bandsaw but the smaller they are the cheaper they are built. If you buy a small one spend as little as possible.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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bondogaposis

4925 posts in 2466 days


#5 posted 02-18-2018 06:07 PM

One of the problems with the smaller bandsaws is that the blades run too hot and when they get hot they break. If you want a 14” bandsaw, I’d put the money you will waste on a 9” saw towards that and look for one on the used market.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Loren

10477 posts in 3762 days


#6 posted 02-18-2018 06:19 PM

I wouldn’t have much of a preference either
way. Narrow scrolling blades are likely to
break on you with either size.

On the used market the old Shopsmith 10”
band saws are well made. INCAs are as well
but hard to find.

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 2980 days


#7 posted 02-18-2018 06:42 PM


One of the problems with the smaller bandsaws is that the blades run too hot and when they get hot they break. If you want a 14” bandsaw, I d put the money you will waste on a 9” saw towards that and look for one on the used market.

- bondogaposis


I have never had a blade break on my 9 inch.

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patcollins

1687 posts in 2980 days


#8 posted 02-18-2018 06:43 PM



Eventually I d like to get a 14”+ bandsaw but that s not going to happen in the foreseeable future… so it s either a 9” or 10”. I m leaning towards a 9”. Is there enough of a difference between a 9” and 10” that it s a poor decision to go with a 9”?

I currently have a jigsaw and a diy table that can mount the jigsaw upside down. This setup works fine but I keep wanting a bandsaw every time I use it. If a jigsaw is good enough I would think a 9 inch is good… or is a 10 inch the smarter choice?

- InstantSiv


Personally I would recomend buying the Craftsman (Rikon) 10 inch bandsaw. Your capacity is really limited to about 2 inches thick hardwood. I could slice a 2×4 on mine but it was slow and a 2×4 is not very hard.

Stick with a 1/4” blade, the biggest problem with the smaller saws is they are not stiff enough for a wider blade to tension it enough.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1801 posts in 3558 days


#9 posted 02-18-2018 06:57 PM

Not knowing exactly what your intend to use is so it makes it hard to make a recommendation but in general I would not suggest getting anything less than a 14” saw. In my opinion you might be better of with your jig saw than a 10” band saw.
The measurement on band saws is related to the depth of the cut between the blade and the back of the saw. The height or thickness of the cut in not usually stated. For example my 17” saw is actually 16.25 deep and 12” high.

Here is one of the best videos on setting up a bandsaw I have seen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGbZqWac0jU

-- Les B, Oregon

View OldDon's profile

OldDon

8 posts in 212 days


#10 posted 02-18-2018 07:48 PM

Eventually I d like to get a 14”+ bandsaw but that s not going to happen in the foreseeable future… so it s either a 9” or 10”. I m leaning towards a 9”. Is there enough of a difference between a 9” and 10” that it s a poor decision to go with a 9”?

I currently have a jigsaw and a diy table that can mount the jigsaw upside down. This setup works fine but I keep wanting a bandsaw every time I use it. If a jigsaw is good enough I would think a 9 inch is good… or is a 10 inch the smarter choice?

- InstantSiv

Personally I would recomend buying the Craftsman (Rikon) 10 inch bandsaw. Your capacity is really limited to about 2 inches thick hardwood. I could slice a 2×4 on mine but it was slow and a 2×4 is not very hard.

Stick with a 1/4” blade, the biggest problem with the smaller saws is they are not stiff enough for a wider blade to tension it enough.

- patcollins

That’s the saw (Craftsman) that I purchased a year or so ago and also picked up a 3 pack (1/8” – 3/8”, I think?) of blades from Sears that were dirt cheap compared to better brands and work okay for non-critical work. I’ve cut 8/4’s maple with mine as a test with the blade that comes with the saw. I just won’t purchase a long extended warranty from Sears, IMHO.

-- Retired old guy enjoying the golden years. Ha!

View jbay's profile

jbay

2580 posts in 1014 days


#11 posted 02-18-2018 08:04 PM

I have a Delta 14” and I couldn’t think of a reason to have anything smaller.
I think of my Delta as the minimum for an entry band saw.

I agree with Bondo,
(“I’d put the money you will waste on a 9” saw towards that and look for one on the used market.”)

View Tabletop's profile

Tabletop

138 posts in 862 days


#12 posted 02-18-2018 08:09 PM

I have a used powermatic 14”. I’d take 500.

I upgraded to a 19” grizzly.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6882 posts in 2314 days


#13 posted 02-18-2018 08:22 PM

I’ve got two Delta 14” machines, but have been on the lookout for a while for a 10” machine to dedicate to smaller scroll work (to compliment my scroll saw). Something like the model 768:

Or the way cool Delta Homecraft Gumby machine (Cat #28-110):

They show up infrequently, and every time one has around here, I’ve been too slow – they don’t stay for sale very long.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View jbay's profile

jbay

2580 posts in 1014 days


#14 posted 02-18-2018 08:51 PM

It’s great to have the 9 or 10” for smaller stuff, IF you had a bigger one also.

But if you don’t have a bigger one then you are Always going to be limited on what you can do.

The 14” is still small enough to put an 1/8” blade on and do scroll work,
yet big enough to rip thicker stuff also.

View InstantSiv's profile

InstantSiv

262 posts in 1710 days


#15 posted 02-18-2018 11:20 PM

Thanks everyone for taking time to respond.

To clear up… I don’t think I would use a bandsaw enough to really justify going with a bigger model and my shop is small so a 14” bandsaw isn’t really practical for me right now… I don’t plan on increasing shop size or needing a bigger saw anytime soon so a smaller one seems better for my needs.

The question I have has to do with 9” or 10” ones… Like Rick_M said… spend as little as possible. That was my thinking and why I am leaning towards 9”... I was wondering if the difference is big enough between 9” and 10” models that the 10” would be better bang for buck because I noticed quite a difference in price.

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