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Turning Novice-Just brought home a Rockwell 46-525 (I Think) Now What

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Forum topic by pete7170 posted 02-17-2018 03:40 PM 817 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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pete7170

15 posts in 305 days


02-17-2018 03:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe

Sorry about the photo orientation. First post in here. I was recommended to join this forum from a woodworkers buy/sell group. I just got what I think is a Rockwell 46-525 (from images I got online) Mine does not have any markings at all. I am really wanting to refurbish and restore with the intention of keeping it and using for my own enjoyment (and addiction). If anyone has experience with this unit and/or access to a manual I would really appreciate any and all input. I’m a little intimidated by is as I have only used a Jet midi lathe before. I love taking old and making like new almost as much as I love taking logs and making beautiful objects. As always a work in progress. Thank you in advance.


10 replies so far

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

620 posts in 1507 days


#1 posted 02-17-2018 04:46 PM

Does look like you are right from pics at OWWM. I don’t know anything about them except you have to be careful with the Reeves drive and only try to change speeds during operation or you can break the pulley.

If your number is correct….and it does look right.
Probably some folks here will know a lot about them but if not here is a link to a mechanical rebuild at OWWM.
http://www.owwm.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=184210&hilit=Rockwell+46+525

Manual
http://vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=1489

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View toyguy's profile

toyguy

1665 posts in 4043 days


#2 posted 02-17-2018 05:15 PM

you actually have a pretty good machine there, Definitely needs some cleaning up and a bit of TLC. Think you can have many enjoyable hours turning on it.

First thing, after you get it cleaned up…. especially the ways, then you will need some turning tools and a means of sharpening…..... depending on what you plan on turning, a good starter set like available at LV should get you going. There are other set available also, or you can just buy as you go….... but a good bowl gouge is always good to have….. but again, depends what you are planing on doing.

A grinder and a system to maintain a constant bevel is a must. the wolverine grinding jig is probably the best and well worth the cost.

Good luck…..........

-- Brian, Ontario Canada,

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pete7170

15 posts in 305 days


#3 posted 02-17-2018 05:47 PM

Thank y’all very much. I’ve got the manual and schematics now, so valuable!!! Now on to how much cleaning up and if replacing or repacking the bearings should be included. Concerned with my abilities to reassemble and not mess it up or cost me to have a shop fix my mess ups.

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1165 posts in 1114 days


#4 posted 02-17-2018 07:36 PM



Thank y’all very much. I’ve got the manual and schematics now, so valuable!!! Now on to how much cleaning up and if replacing or repacking the bearings should be included. Concerned with my abilities to reassemble and not mess it up or cost me to have a shop fix my mess ups.

- pete7170

Take pictures or video as you go as a reference for reassembly, if needed. A lathe is a pretty simple machine and, if you’re even moderately mechanically inclined you should have no problem.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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LeeMills

620 posts in 1507 days


#5 posted 02-17-2018 11:51 PM

It may not need much repair at all. The rust looks like surface rust which is easy to remove. If the bearings are good to go and the belt is OK a light cleaning and general maintenance is probably all you need.
For rust I would suggest a rust converter (RustMort, Ospho, etc) available from any auto repair or hardware store.
Converts the iron oxide to iron phosphate (not rust anymore). It will turn black; go over before and after with a brass brush and 0000 steel wool as needed.
I would pay particular attention to the use and recommendations in the manual for the Reeves drive mechanism.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Ripper70

1165 posts in 1114 days


#6 posted 02-18-2018 03:23 PM

If LJ member Mr.Unix were to pipe in here, I’m sure he’d recommend replacing the bearings. After all, if you’ve got the machine in pieces anyway, why not? Bearings are cheap and essential and should one fail while the machine is running, it could cost you allot more in the long run.

In your case, considering that you really don’t know much about the history of the lathe, I’d agree with Mr. Unix.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Madrona's profile

Madrona

121 posts in 1101 days


#7 posted 02-19-2018 08:59 PM

I owned one exactly like that for over 20 years. It was flawless. Never an issue. If all is good with it, just clean it up and use it. There are two things I will mention. The Reeves drive requires a small amount of light oil, 20w or less, even 3-in-1 will work great. Just apply 2-3 drops to the shaft every 6 months or so to keep it working smoothly. The other thing is the indexing pin on the headstock. It is just that, a pin. It is not meant to lock up the spindle and apply a lot of torque tightening something like a chuck or faceplate. That said, I did it all the time without issue. Just know, it’s not meant to take a lot of force. Also, it’s kind of difficult to get it into the little holes in the pulley. You may want to drill those holes out. I did, but with exactly the same size bit as the holes are, 1/8” or so. Just to clean them up, they get a little bunged up in use. Oh, if you get it up and running and have an issue with the speed control lever not staying in place, send me a message before you go monkeying around with it. I may have a tip or two. Enjoy!

-- Living In The Woods Of Beautiful Bonney Lake, Washington

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pete7170

15 posts in 305 days


#8 posted 02-19-2018 09:10 PM

Y’all have been great! Cannot thank you enough. When I bought it it does have a problem with the variable control handle staying in place. Also I do not believe there are indexing holes on the pulley. It may have been replaced. I’m having a blast just thinking about restoring and working on this lathe. As luck would have it I just picked up a Rockwell 14 inch bandsaw model 28–240 I honestly can’t believe my luck as now I can use the same paint color for both machines. Both Machines seem to be in good working order. Just a little cleaning perhaps replacing of a couple minor items and the addiction be in full bloom! In all sincerity thank you all again for sharing your knowledge .

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pete7170

15 posts in 305 days


#9 posted 02-20-2018 01:39 AM

I was looking at the schematics for the lathe End it appears as if there are two bearings that are different in the headstock. Is this correct? Or can I use the same bearings on both sides of the headstock. I was also wondering if there are any other maintenance items with the Reeves pulley system. Thank you

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MrUnix

7053 posts in 2405 days


#10 posted 02-20-2018 01:53 AM

Pull the bearings and see what is in there. Doubt they both will be the same size, and may not even be what is indicated in the parts diagram. Yank them, check for numbers, measure to be double sure, then give Lynne a call over at Accurate bearing she will hook you up. Reeves drive is pretty simple… just clean and lube.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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