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Forum topic by IFHConstruction posted 04-12-2011 12:06 AM 3944 views 1 time favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IFHConstruction

13 posts in 2158 days


04-12-2011 12:06 AM

I want to fab up kitchen cabinets for our new house. I very much like the look of beaded inset cabinetry with the bead on the rail and stile. I have not been able to find a source at any of my suppliers. Where do you guys get yours and if you make your own do you profile it on your shaper or ts and what bits/blades do you recommend?

Thanks in advance,
Steve


12 replies so far

View wseand's profile

wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#1 posted 04-12-2011 05:41 AM

You make your rails and stiles then you bead the inside edges. I use a router in a router table and a beading bit. If you are going to use mortise and tenon to join them then you need to miter the beaded part where they meet. If you are going to miter the Rails and Stiles there is no need to miter the bead. Hope that makes sense, I don’t know how to explain it any better. Maybe someone else on here can explain it better.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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wseand

2754 posts in 2508 days


#2 posted 04-12-2011 05:47 AM

Found this pic.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View drewnahant's profile

drewnahant

222 posts in 2556 days


#3 posted 04-12-2011 06:03 AM

That method is not actually very common, kregg recently came out with a special router table setup just for it, but it’s a bit pricey if you are only doing one set of cabinets. it is much eaiser to sumply get the appropriate router bit ( if you have a router table), cut the profiled strips, oversize your door and drawer openings, miter and frame in your bead strips. If you dont have a router table, you can use a profile setup for the TS, but I hate those things, they are dangerous, and they dont turn fast enough to provide a smooth finish, I have had a cutter fly out before, so be careful!

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2110 days


#4 posted 04-12-2011 06:09 AM

Watch the video:

Video

The old way is what I have done for years. Make my own bead with a router table, cut to size, miter, glue etc.
Use a bit like this Bit

Kreg system works but pricy

-- Respectfully, Paul

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IFHConstruction

13 posts in 2158 days


#5 posted 04-12-2011 03:14 PM

I have a router table in my shop and rarely use my router. I do have a delta x5 shaper though for my moulding needs. Are there any specific shaper cutters that you recommend? Also what is the standard with of bead mould? It looks to be about 1/8”.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2160 days


#6 posted 04-12-2011 03:47 PM

^I’ve been really happy with Sommerfield router bits but I don’t think they make a beaded set. Amana makes this http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/2-piecebeadrailandstilebitset-12shank.aspx and Freud has one at Rocker, I think.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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Pick

30 posts in 2500 days


#7 posted 04-12-2011 04:25 PM

+1 for PJones- Make the face frame first, and then make the bead, miter it, and tack it in place with a pin nailer.
Use this opportunity to buy a pin nailer if you don’t already have one- they’re fantastic! If you aren’t going into production for your whole neighborhood, then the kreg system is a bit much.

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IFHConstruction

13 posts in 2158 days


#8 posted 04-12-2011 10:29 PM

I’m sorry my earlier post should have said I do not have a router table in my shop.

I use a shaper only.

I’m pretty familiar with cabinet construction methods, I am mainly looking for a recommendation on what you guys use to make bead moulding or if you source it out, where from? Also if you produce it yourself on a shaper, what bits do you recommend?

Thanks,
Steve

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

986 posts in 2110 days


#9 posted 04-13-2011 05:40 AM

In past used my shaper for everything and used cutters like these, Cutter, however switched over to a router table because bits were cheap and for short runs worked fine. On an occasion I will run 500-1000 ft of what I use the most just to have on hand with the shaper.

I am too small a shop to farm out, and have never seen available from my vendors but that does not mean someone does not make available in different wood species.

So, that being the case, still make them the old way, face frames first (yes), bead, cut to length & miter, pin nail & glue.

Also, have a Williams and Hussey Molding machine and had them grind special cutter to make multiples at a single pass but found I used either the Shaper or Router table and only used the molder for special molding jobs.

-- Respectfully, Paul

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IFHConstruction

13 posts in 2158 days


#10 posted 04-16-2011 08:02 AM

Bump

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 2134 days


#11 posted 04-16-2011 09:22 AM

If you are talking about multiple beads across the face of the stiles,along the length such as 1/4 or 3/8 apart,(bead width) I have done that with a molding head on the table saw, for the small beads I think the knives ,I have ,cut 4 beads, at once , one cutter set cuts two at once, the other set of knifes ,cuts one bead,at once(I think 1/2in wide) 4 changeable cutters around the molding head,
You can get different profiles. These cutters have no flats between beads
There was a discussion about them on LJ yesterday
IF you can make sense of what I just said !! GOOD !!!!

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

View bubinga's profile

bubinga

861 posts in 2134 days


#12 posted 04-16-2011 11:10 AM

I guess I’m talking something different.
but ,you could do that with molding head to

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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