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Face shield when using the table saw

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Forum topic by el_mustango posted 02-15-2018 09:24 PM 2419 views 0 times favorited 57 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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el_mustango

29 posts in 234 days


02-15-2018 09:24 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw safety

Sorry if this has been talked about before (I looked and couldn’t find any threads).

After the kickback issues I had a few weeks back with my table saw, I’ve decided that I have to not only make sure the safety features of the saw itself are up to snuff but that I wear the appropriate safety gear. I’ve purchased a heavy-duty, padded shop apron and would like to get a face shield. Would the shield below offer adequate protection should a piece of wood kickback from my table saw and fly at my face?

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B001VXXUWK/_encoding=UTF8?coliid=I3VJGEIREYMKH7&colid=6CACM77KAKVL&psc=1

Uvex Bionic Face Shield

Thanks!

-- I'm a simple man. I like pretty dark-haired women and breakfast food.


57 replies so far

View Kazooman's profile (online now)

Kazooman

1024 posts in 1974 days


#1 posted 02-15-2018 09:31 PM

I did not refer to the specs that they claim the face shield meets, but I did notice that they indicate that it must be worn with safety glasses or goggles. It sounds like you cannot count on the face shield alone to protect your eyes.

Note added later: Well, I decided to look up the ANSI standard and I do not understand why they would require safety glasses under the shield. Seems like wearing a belt and suspenders at the same time.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 185 days


#2 posted 02-15-2018 09:46 PM

from personal experience, I now concentrate on PREVENTING kickbacks.
I no longer cut anything smaller than my arm freehand – I will use the sled for those.

I would look for something with a marriage of a hockey mask, major league catchers mask,
lumberjack chainsaw helmet, football helmet, etc etc etc – LOL yeah, a little overkill – - –

but, to shield the eyes, nose and throat from flying lumber is critical.
damage to the hands, arms and torso is easier to work around than a banged up face.
[been there – done that – and got the eyepatch to prove it]

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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newwoodbutcher

742 posts in 2872 days


#3 posted 02-15-2018 10:24 PM

I just wear safety glasses

-- Ken

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jmos

838 posts in 2391 days


#4 posted 02-15-2018 10:35 PM

Per OSHA, face shields are not intended to protect from impacts, just chips, dust, and the like. Safety glasses or goggles are primary protection for your eyes.

I imagine something intended to protect your face from impacts would look more like catchers mask.

The face shield you referenced would probably help if a small cut off got airborne and hit your face, but wouldn’t do a lot of good if it were a good size piece moving at high speed. Having said that, I don’t see it would be likely to hurt wearing it.

-- John

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

4996 posts in 2515 days


#5 posted 02-15-2018 10:38 PM

A lot of turners use that model and are happy with it. I have one (I’m a wanna-be turner) and like it a lot…but as mentioned, you have safety glasses under it.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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Hermit

186 posts in 1347 days


#6 posted 02-15-2018 10:39 PM

I have this exact mask and use it for weed eating. Have been thinking of getting another for the shop. I can’t answer your question but if you wear glasses like I do, this mask will not fog up on you.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

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Tennessee

2873 posts in 2536 days


#7 posted 02-15-2018 11:01 PM

My take: I had a radial arm saw cutting with the grain along the fence get caught, and the piece went through the wall of my shop when it kicked back.

I don’t know about you, but I cannot imagine a safety shield that would stop a piece of hardwood that will go through plaster, insulation, and T111 siding on one hit. And since the radial arm saw blade is turning about the same RPM as a tablesaw, seems to me that your face shield would not do the job.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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Loren

10476 posts in 3670 days


#8 posted 02-15-2018 11:10 PM

Tradesmen who ran shapers in the old days
would wear lead-line aprons. The old heads
could throw knives.

View clin's profile

clin

849 posts in 1018 days


#9 posted 02-15-2018 11:19 PM

I’m just guessing, but I suspect the additional requirement for eye protection under may be due to the size of the face shield. Something can break it, and it would potentially have more and larger fragments. Also, it might be that being larger it is more prone to being shattered than the much smaller lenses of goggles or safety glasses.

Also, to reduce weight, I would expect the plastic to be thinner than typical safety glasses and goggles. Again, just speculation on my part. If they say it should be worn with safety glass, I’d take them at their word.

One thing is certain, it would reduce if not completely prevent injury. I’ve seen John’s photos, and you’re not wrong to be concerned about this.

-- Clin

View Hermit's profile

Hermit

186 posts in 1347 days


#10 posted 02-15-2018 11:53 PM

They do claim they are rated ansi z87+ which was tested for high velocity impact. https://blog.safetyglassesusa.com/what-does-ansi-z87-1-2010-certified-mean/
Scroll down for the description of the ”+”. Video also shows the testing method.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

View Kazooman's profile (online now)

Kazooman

1024 posts in 1974 days


#11 posted 02-16-2018 01:10 AM


They do claim they are rated ansi z87+ which was tested for high velocity impact. https://blog.safetyglassesusa.com/what-does-ansi-z87-1-2010-certified-mean/
Scroll down for the description of the ”+”. Video also shows the testing method.

- Hermit

Yep, That’s why I wonder why they specify wearing safety glasses or goggles with the face shield? Not trying to be a pedant, but I do not understand how the manufacturer can list their product as meeting the ANSI standards for impact and then claim that the user requires additional protection. I would have thought that the standard was designed to protect against an impact. Clin rightly points out the issue of the size of the protecting screen area on how well a barrier can protect, but the bottom line remains. The manufacturer claims that the face shield meets the ANSI specs. Either it will or it won’t survive a major force blow. Should I also wear goggles? Perhaps industrial rated safety glasses underneath? Maybe a layer of chain link fence to,deflect the big chunks?

Sounds like the folks in the lawyer’s suite writing boilerplate to cover the corporate a$$.

View el_mustango's profile

el_mustango

29 posts in 234 days


#12 posted 02-16-2018 01:10 AM

Thanks for the responses so far. I will def wear safety glasses underneath. Better safe than sorry.


from personal experience, I now concentrate on PREVENTING kickbacks.
I no longer cut anything smaller than my arm freehand – I will use the sled for those.

I would look for something with a marriage of a hockey mask, major league catchers mask,
lumberjack chainsaw helmet, football helmet, etc etc etc – LOL yeah, a little overkill – - –

but, to shield the eyes, nose and throat from flying lumber is critical.
damage to the hands, arms and torso is easier to work around than a banged up face.
[been there – done that – and got the eyepatch to prove it]

- John Smith

John – your story has def effected me and is one of the reasons I want face protection.


They do claim they are rated ansi z87+ which was tested for high velocity impact. https://blog.safetyglassesusa.com/what-does-ansi-z87-1-2010-certified-mean/
Scroll down for the description of the ”+”. Video also shows the testing method.

- Hermit

Hermit, thanks so much for sharing this. Very interested.

-- I'm a simple man. I like pretty dark-haired women and breakfast food.

View woodworm1962's profile

woodworm1962

145 posts in 123 days


#13 posted 02-16-2018 01:25 AM

I think you have over looked another very important and vital area of the male human body my friend!

-- No one likes the truth...

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

237 posts in 149 days


#14 posted 02-16-2018 01:35 AM

There will always be something else you COULD put on to protect yourself in any given situation. However, at some point it gets excessive, and even dangerous, to have so much safety equipment. The best thing you can do is to be mindful and educated, as well as wear protective equipment (within reason). Most kickbacks are caused by the user making a mistake, which is bound to happen at some point, even to the most experienced. That is when protective equipment plays its role. Like I said though, the most important aspects of safety are mindfulness and education. I hope I made myself clear, I feel like I rambled, lol.

-- “How you feeling, Roy?”... “a little unappreciated, Al...” - Die Hard

View caboxmaker's profile

caboxmaker

281 posts in 410 days


#15 posted 02-16-2018 01:50 AM

If the purpose of the padded apron and face shield is to protect against your next kickback then you’re approaching this all wrong. You’ve already assumed you will have another kickback. As stated in post #14, mindfulness and education are the most important aspects of preventing kickback. After my first (and only) kickback I bought a Grrripper. Haven’t had another kickback in 15 years. Spend your money wisely.

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