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Epoxy Resin for Corn Hole Boards

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Forum topic by Nreese posted 02-13-2018 11:37 PM 334 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Nreese

19 posts in 103 days


02-13-2018 11:37 PM

I’ve been collecting beer bottle caps for the better part of a year now and have finally amassed the roughly 2k caps I’ll need for theses boards. I’m planning on recessing the plywood about 1/4” from the top to give some space for the bottle caps to sit flush to the top.

My dilemma is what to use to prevent the epoxy from running out of the 6” hole in the board? I thought about drilling the hole after the epoxy has cured, but I think a 6” hole saw would produce a pretty ugly hole and I don’t really feel like sanding it out by hand. My thought is to use a piece of PVC to plug the hole during the pouring and curing time, but I’m not entirely sure how easily the pipe will come off.

Any ideas?

-- An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools


8 replies so far

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MrUnix

6705 posts in 2195 days


#1 posted 02-13-2018 11:42 PM

Painters tape.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: How are you going to let the air under the caps escape?

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Nreese

19 posts in 103 days


#2 posted 02-13-2018 11:57 PM


PS: How are you going to let the air under the caps escape?

- MrUnix

I was planning on putting a light layer of epoxy down, then setting the caps in, then finishing the pour.

Or I might drill a small hole under every cap. It probably won’t take too long.

-- An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools

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MrUnix

6705 posts in 2195 days


#3 posted 02-14-2018 12:17 AM

I was planning on putting a light layer of epoxy down, then setting the caps in, then finishing the pour.
- Nreese

They will float if you do it all in one shot… I’m guessing you want the epoxy to go over the top of the caps, and not have the tops exposed? Holes would probably work, but I think they would diminish the look somewhat and it would still be a bear to get all the air out completely to keep them from floating. If it were me, I’d put down a thin layer of epoxy, maybe half the height of the caps or less. Set the caps in place where you want them and then let the epoxy cure, which will lock them in place. If they still want to float, you could weigh them down with something on top. Once that’s done, then do your final pour. There are probably a bunch of better ideas, so hopefully others will chime in with theirs.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rich

2813 posts in 585 days


#4 posted 02-14-2018 12:20 AM

Clear packing tape. It won’t stick to the epoxy, and if you apply it neatly, will leave a clean, smooth edge.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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Nreese

19 posts in 103 days


#5 posted 02-14-2018 12:47 AM



If it were me, I d put down a thin layer of epoxy, maybe half the height of the caps or less. Set the caps in place where you want them and then let the epoxy cure, which will lock them in place. If they still want to float, you could weigh them down with something on top. Once that s done, then do your final pour.

I was thinking about that, I was a little unsure about any prep work that needed to be done before pouring the final layer. But that sounds like a solid option, thanks!

-- An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools

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CaptainKlutz

264 posts in 1490 days


#6 posted 02-14-2018 01:00 AM

+1 clear Heavy Duty Packing tape for hole 1st construction
but
Cured epoxy machines easily with HSS tools. Behaves like unfilled plastic when drilling/cutting. It is also capable of being polished to an almost glossy appearance with a slow speed buffing wheel. So you can cut the hole after decoration, and then sand/polish any edge imperfections to match the epoxy top.

Note Room temp sure epoxies take weeks to reach full cure. Until it has fully cured, the surface will scratch more easily. Suggest you refrain from hitting the epoxy coated surfaces with dirty old bean bags for 3-4 weeks. :)

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Rick

9593 posts in 3029 days


#7 posted 02-14-2018 02:06 AM

Painters Tape.

Rick

-- LIFE is what happens when you're planning on doing Other Things!

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

6845 posts in 3364 days


#8 posted 02-14-2018 07:04 AM

To stop the epoxy, you can try a cement preform.

They come in many different sizes, from 4” to 48” diameter.

You may need to wax the outside of the tube, the inside of most are waterproof …..
that’s where the cement goes duh!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

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