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Forum topic by HandHewn posted 02-13-2018 08:18 AM 410 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HandHewn

7 posts in 100 days


02-13-2018 08:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: plane planes hand tools hand planes stanley bench plane jack plane antique tools vintage tools tool restoration

I recently acquired an antique Stanley Bailey No. 5 1/2 Jack Plane. I am trying to figure out if it is a type 12, type 13 or a “frankenplane” with parts form different planes mixed together. According to the type study found here type 13 planes are distinguished from type 12 by the appearance of only 1 patent date (Apr-19-10) on the body behind the frog, as well as the appearance of a notched Stanley rectangle logo on the lever cap. My Plane has the 1 patent date on the casting consistent with a type 13, but the lever cap has no logo and appears to be consistent with a type 12. In addition, the plane iron has the Stanley Sweetheart logo with the “SW” heart overlapping the notched Stanley logo with the text NEW BRITAIN,
CONN. U.S.A. on two lines below. According to the type study, this logo dates from 1920, which would be consistent with a type 12 plane.

Is it possible this is a type 13 plane that Stanley made with some leftover parts from the type 12s lying around in the shop, or perhaps a type 12 with an early example of casting that typified type 13s.? Or is it more likely to be a type 13 that a previous owner for some odd reason replaced with type 12 parts?







6 replies so far

View Don W's profile

Don W

18710 posts in 2563 days


#1 posted 02-13-2018 12:35 PM

First, Roger Smith’s Type study was for the#4 Planes, so some features will be different on other sizes.

Next, there was no thought of a type back then. Parts were used until parts were gone. I’m sure things like a plain cap lingered in the bottom of a bin for a while.

And lastly, if a part was lost or broken a trip to the hardware store for one was in order. Vintage of that part wasn’t even an after thought as long as it worked.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View HandHewn's profile

HandHewn

7 posts in 100 days


#2 posted 02-13-2018 02:46 PM

All of that makes sense. I’m trying to assign a date to the plane’s manufacture. I guess based on the number of patent dates on the casting, I can safely assume that the plane body was manufactured in 1925-1928, and the presence of the earlier parts (cap iron, lever cap) is likely incidental? I realize it’s a # 5 1/2, while Smith’s type study was for #4s. Mostly I’m wondering if anyone more familiar with plane dating knows if the patent date is as reliable a characteristic for dating #5 1/2s as it is for #4s

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4929 posts in 3956 days


#3 posted 02-13-2018 03:25 PM

Looks just like my 5 1/2 except my iron just says made in U.S.A. with the SweetHart (didn’t that designation come from someone’s name? Hart, not heart.) Tall knob, plain lever cap, and April 19-10 date. Mine is a 5 1/2 C.
Stanley really did mix and match some parts didn’t they.
Sure is a good worker plane.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

19972 posts in 2679 days


#4 posted 02-13-2018 04:03 PM

Maybe it was made on the day before Inventory at the factory….where they had to get rid of the “older stuff”, and start the year with all new…old parts bins used up, to get them out of the parts inventory..BEFORE the Auditors see them…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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HandHewn

7 posts in 100 days


#5 posted 02-13-2018 04:25 PM

Maybe it was made on the day before Inventory at the factory….where they had to get rid of the “older stuff”, and start the year with all new…old parts bins used up, to get them out of the parts inventory..BEFORE the Auditors see them…

I envisioned such a scenario as this. I guess if I were going to sell it on eBay I’d call it a “type 13 with some type 12 parts”. However I’m going to restore it and make it my primary user plane instead. I guess I can assume the body is from 1925ish and the iron 1920 as those seem to be the most precisely dated components.

View Tim's profile

Tim

3803 posts in 1957 days


#6 posted 02-13-2018 05:59 PM



Is it possible this is a type 13 plane that Stanley made with some leftover parts from the type 12s lying around in the shop, or perhaps a type 12 with an early example of casting that typified type 13s.? Or is it more likely to be a type 13 that a previous owner for some odd reason replaced with type 12 parts?
- HandHewn

From every description of type studies I’ve read, your first option is the most likely because in your case it’s the casting that is the most recent. So they finished the casting and grabbed from the available parts in the bins. The third option is certainly possible, as Don said if someone broke a part and got replacements. Usually that would result in newer replacements but it’s possible someone got ahold of older replacement parts for one reason or another.

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