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Forum topic by Drake32 posted 02-13-2018 08:17 AM 376 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Drake32

2 posts in 9 days


02-13-2018 08:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question lathe

After talking with my dad about my interest in getting into woodturning, he said he thought he had some tools for me that were his dad’s. Keep in mind I am new to the idea of wood turning and the tools of the trade and the may not even be for wood. I did some searching on the web and couldn’t find anything like these. They are about 28 inches long with 18 of that being a wooden handle. Two have round steel extending the rest of the 10 inches, one with a round bullet shaped tip (not sharp) the other with a spinning wheel type thing (also not sharp). The third one has square steel and has a replacable cutter of some sort. They look like lathe tools but I have no idea what they would be used for or even if they are usable. https://www.flickr.com/photos/155529145@N08/shares/860Vvm
https://www.flickr.com/photos/155529145@N08/shares/54S5u3

Thanks in advance for the help with this. This is my first post here on LJ so if I screwed the pics up I’m sorry.


8 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2240 posts in 2040 days


#1 posted 02-13-2018 10:18 AM

Helps if figure what type of turning want to do before buying tools, lathe, turning accessories then look for what you can afford. Also have to thing about sharpening & finishing equipment and supplies. Might help if had a look at some woodturning books at you puplic library or You-tube videos online.

I wouldn’t want to guess what those tools in your photos are, certaian they have very little to do with turning wood on a lathe. Simple google image search will give some ideas. List three vendors online that also have free catalogs. There are so many online vendors could not list them all.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/
https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/
https://www.pennstateind.com/store/woodturning-tools.html

-- Bill

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

177 posts in 2913 days


#2 posted 02-13-2018 05:33 PM

I am way out of my element here, but could they be for metal spinning???

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Drake32

2 posts in 9 days


#3 posted 02-13-2018 07:39 PM

Thanks for the replies and Bill thanks for those links, they were helpful. My dad has never used the tools and has no idea what they came from. I was telling him about the replaceable carbide turning tools I’ve been eyeing and he sent me pics of the tools above to see if I could use them. It doesn’t appear they were for wood but I wasn’t sure. But either way he did find a type 11 no. 6 Stanley bailey hand plane which I am pretty excited about trying to restore. Thanks for the help guys!

View HapHazzard's profile

HapHazzard

116 posts in 774 days


#4 posted 02-14-2018 04:32 AM

You’re not too far out of your element. That’s exactly what those are. The nomenclature varies, depending on whom you ask, but the one with the roller looks like a beading tool. It could be used as a roller tool, but the groove in the middle is there to form a raised bead under the right conditions. I think that one with the rounded conical tip is called a point tool, and then the one with the little insert in the end is called a trimmer.

If you’re curious about how they’re used, youtube probably has hours of videos of them in action.


I am way out of my element here, but could they be for metal spinning???

- xeddog


-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

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HapHazzard

116 posts in 774 days


#5 posted 02-14-2018 04:47 AM

Bill, those Carter and Son tools look incredible! I didn’t even look at the prices, but just look at how they’re made. When I saw how the blades and shanks are thinner than the middle part, at first I thought they were forged, but, no, it says they grind them, so they must be starting with a bigger billet and grinding them down. That’s a lot of metal to remove, and M42 is about the hardest thing there is to grind, even annealed. All the things that make it a great hot-work tool steel also make it a nightmare to machine—unmatched red-hardness, incredible wear-resistance—just what you need when you’re trying to form something.

Whe you start making your own woodturning tools, you can really appreciate what goes into making tools like those.

-- Unix programmers never die; they just > /dev/null

View Rick_M's profile

Rick_M

11112 posts in 2286 days


#6 posted 02-14-2018 04:53 AM



... metal spinning???

- xeddog

+1 That’d be my guess too.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2240 posts in 2040 days


#7 posted 02-14-2018 11:08 AM

I have no experience with their tools but know can buy handled or unhandled. They are a new turning tool vendor and know they stand by their tools from reading post on other message boards. They have more vendors selling there products.

https://carterandsontoolworks.com/

More familiar with Doug Thomson tools which can buy handled or unhandled. Again Doug will make things right if something goes south. Better to from him, just few other vendors sell his tools.

http://thompsonlathetools.com/

Could tell if those tools had anything to do with metal spinning not beefy enough but might be.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=metal+spinning+tools&go=Search&qs=ds&form=QBILPG

Back in the day could buy a wood lathe strictly for metal spinning or combination of woodturning too right from lathe manufacturer. Tool rest & tools either optional or bought from lathe manufacturer. Have several metal spinners using wood lathes today all you need is different tool rest & set of tools. Know several metal spinners have demonstrated the craft at different turning clubs & symposiums.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=metal%20lathe%20spinners&qs=n&form=QBIR&sp=-1&pq=metal%20lathe%20spinners&sc=5-20&sk=&cvid=03C113ED8C174558958502DC2664EC04

-- Bill

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

300 posts in 108 days


#8 posted 02-14-2018 01:49 PM

They look like some of the leather tools a buddies dad used to make holsters and briddles and parts back in the day

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