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Router in Table Saw table w/ Dust Bucket or other enclosure - Do you...

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Forum topic by WorksInTheory posted 02-12-2018 05:32 PM 4021 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WorksInTheory

143 posts in 1684 days


02-12-2018 05:32 PM

... remove the router’s stock attachment pieces for dust collection?

Specifically I have a Triton 3.25 hp router in the right side table enclosed by a metal Dust Bucket (Rockler?) and was wondering when you have this set up do you remove all the little clear plastic doohickey’s that I think were for if you were using the router hand held you could plug in a hose as well as deflect chips so you can see?

ALSO – do you leave the router in the table? I have an Incra table so I think it’s MDF w/ Phenolic or something – Just wondering if I leave this behemoth in there will it make the table sag over time?


10 replies so far

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WorksInTheory

143 posts in 1684 days


#1 posted 02-14-2018 08:49 PM

Hmm… did I say something wrong? Bueller? Bueller?

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retfr8flyr

385 posts in 1751 days


#2 posted 02-14-2018 10:30 PM

I have the Incra table in my Jet Xacta saw and I tried using my Triton router with Incra’s Clean Sweep system and I finally gave up on it, due to the way the safety switch works on the Triton. I got a PC 7518 and the Incra lift. With the width on the table in my Jet the weight of the big router and lift made the table start to sag in the middle, so i added a support in the middle and it’s been fine since. I really like this combination and the setup works well for me.

-- Earl

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WorksInTheory

143 posts in 1684 days


#3 posted 02-15-2018 03:49 AM

Thank you Earl. May I ask how you reinforced it?

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WorksInTheory

143 posts in 1684 days


#4 posted 02-17-2018 10:51 PM

So pushing this to the top again – do woodworkers here suggest removing all the plastic chip guards, vac ports etc?

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retfr8flyr

385 posts in 1751 days


#5 posted 02-17-2018 11:42 PM



Thank you Earl. May I ask how you reinforced it?

- WorksInTheory


Since I stopped moving my saw around any more, I just attached an adjustable joist brace to the center of the table behind the router base and brought it back to level.

-- Earl

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jimintx

806 posts in 1666 days


#6 posted 02-18-2018 04:34 AM

So pushing this to the top again – do woodworkers here suggest removing all the plastic chip guards, vac ports etc?
- WorksInTheory

If I read this right, you have the entire router enclosed in a box, and the dust collection hose pulling a vacuum on that box. If this is the setup, then I would remove the plastic dust collection pieces from the router. If they are not connected to dust collection vacuum hose, then they are just sitting there inside the box, and aren’t doing anything in the system anyway.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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WorksInTheory

143 posts in 1684 days


#7 posted 02-18-2018 05:16 AM

Thanks Jim – my question is if it’s not impacting dust collection performance I would leave it in there so I don’t lose them but if it’s impacting dust collection performance, I would remove it. Was wondering if people already came across this and had a suggestions. Thanks!

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therealSteveN

909 posts in 656 days


#8 posted 02-18-2018 06:44 AM

In answer to your question about sag, that is going to depend totally on the top you’ve chosen, or made. If it is a single sheet of MDF, and is a larger table with a big unsupported area, then yes that router being a biggun may make it sag. I like the top they used making this router table You could hang a truck from the bottom of that one. It will start flat, and stay that way.

I have 2 of these dust connectors, one for my small router table, and one on my horizontal router. The small router has that big Triton in it, and I DID remove the Triton parts for undust collection. I like their tools, but the DC on their routers isn’t special. The boot I linked to does a good job of collecting from above, and below on either a regular router table or a horizontal one.

That is my experience, hope it helps.

-- Think safe, be safe

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jimintx

806 posts in 1666 days


#9 posted 02-18-2018 05:37 PM

Thanks Jim – my question is if it s not impacting dust collection performance I would leave it in there so I don t lose them but if it s impacting dust collection performance, I would remove it. Was wondering if people already came across this and had a suggestions. Thanks!
- WorksInTheory

I see. I was thinking the other way round.

I would prefer to remove them if they are not doing anything, because i like to keep things as simple a possible as a starting premise, anyway. Plus, I’d store them so they didn’t get dirty from all the router offal that will sprayed on them inside the table mount.

I recently pulled a simple fixed base router out of a portable table, after it had been mounted there for circa 2 years. The dust and crud and goo that had built up on the router itself was remarkable. I ended up using q-tips and 409 spray and compressed air to finally get it cleaned up. That’s the sort of mess I want to minimize when i can.

With a lot of power tools, there are miscellaneous parts and pieces such as edge guides, and dust attachments, alternate bases, and so on, that I generally do not leave on the tool.
- I put them in a zip-lock and include a slip of paper on which i write what tool they fit.
- I keep those bags in a drawer in the shop.
This is the only way that I have found that works for all that stuff to be findable again later on. For me.

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

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Tony1212

211 posts in 1817 days


#10 posted 02-19-2018 03:49 PM

I have that exact router in a table to the side of my table saw.

I’ve left the plastic guards on them. I haven’t gotten around to it just yet, but I plan on using some CPAP machine tubing to connect it to my dust collection. The tubing fits perfectly in that hole in the guards. The other reason I never took it off is that it never got in my way. I see no benefit in taking it off, and if I did take it off, that just one more thing to lose.

I have it in a Norm Abrams style table, fully enclosed with a door to access the router. I currently have dust collection integrated with the fence, but that doesn’t help when cutting dadoes in the middle of a board. I need some downward suction.

I made my own table, but used the Kreg insert.

I leave the router attached to the insert all the time and have not experienced much, if any, deflection in the year that I’ve had it installed.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

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