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Forum topic by refueler1 posted 03-14-2008 02:46 PM 1209 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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refueler1

7 posts in 3992 days


03-14-2008 02:46 PM

Hello all, I would like to try and make the barrel pencil holder you see below, or not, never attached a photo on this site so don’t know if it will work. It is 5.5” tall by 3” in dia. I am new to turning and not sure what all I need to try this. I have searched around but have not come across an article for beginners on the subject. Can anyone suggest what tools I will need to make one of these and any other suggestions you may have for turning end grain hollow forms. I would also like to make it out of soft wood because I will be woodburning some art work on to it. Thanks.

http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/bb5/refueler1/100_1929A.jpg

-- MSgt Crew Chief, USAF Ret. "No One Kicks A** Without Tanker Gas"


15 replies so far

View Alin Dobra's profile

Alin Dobra

351 posts in 3971 days


#1 posted 03-14-2008 04:51 PM

refuelrer1,

You can easily do that with a bowl gouge. You need hollow form tools only when the neck of the piece is small so you cannot reach with the gouge inside properly. You can probably use a scraper as well, at least to refine the shape.

Alin

-- -- Alin Dobra, Gainesville, Florida

View GaryK's profile

GaryK

10262 posts in 4071 days


#2 posted 03-14-2008 04:57 PM

From the size of it, it looks like you cound turn the outside and use a big forstner bit and lust drill
out the hole in the center. Or visa versa.

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Tony's profile

Tony

986 posts in 4113 days


#3 posted 03-14-2008 07:09 PM

I agree with Gary – I would use a forstner bit to remove the bulk of the material inside the pencil holder, then maybe finish off with a small bowl gouge or scraper (inside) – the outside just use spindle turning techniques, using a wide spindle gouge and parting tool

Tools needed.
1” Roughing gouge
1/2” Spindle Gouge
1/4” parting tool (Barrel rims) and paring to barrel from the stock.
2” forstner bit
3/8” bowl gouge
Sand Paper – 60 through 240 grain
Wax or Oil for protection

Hope this helps

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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GaryK

10262 posts in 4071 days


#4 posted 03-14-2008 07:15 PM

Tony – Do you really think it would really be necessary to clean up the hole after drilling it?

-- Gary - Never pass up the opportunity to make a mistake look like you planned it that way - Tyler, TX

View Tony's profile

Tony

986 posts in 4113 days


#5 posted 03-14-2008 07:50 PM

Gary

It really depends on what you are looking for. If you do not want to see the marks left at the bottom of the cup by the forstner bit, when you look into it, moving the pens and pencils aside, whilst shining a torch through all the debris at the bottom – then YES.

It just depends if it is an “it will do job”, or you want it to be “correct”. I just thought I would post the correct (my interpretation) method for the perfect job. I must admit, if it was for my workshop, then an “it will do job” would be enough, but if it were leaving the shop, then it would be done correctly. one bad job (or not so good), can destroy the reputation of 10 good and more complicated pieces that have left the workshop previously.

Better to learn good habits at the beginning – the bad habits (and I am the world’s expert on this subject) will form naturally later in life, without help from others (no criticism intended).

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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refueler1

7 posts in 3992 days


#6 posted 03-15-2008 04:32 AM

Alin, Gary and Tony, thanks for replying. I didn’t think about using a forster bit for the inside. As for type of wood to use,,,what type of pine would be best for this barrel or do you think I could get away with using bass wood since it is easy to do woodburning on? If I under stand correctly, the use of a hollowing tool is really only for those projects that have a small opening but a larger body? I can make an large opening form with a gouge or scrapper?

-- MSgt Crew Chief, USAF Ret. "No One Kicks A** Without Tanker Gas"

View Tony's profile

Tony

986 posts in 4113 days


#7 posted 03-16-2008 11:44 AM

Hi Refueler

Pine is OK for practising on to refine your technique, but personally I do not like to turn with pine, it splinters too much. Bass wood is OK, but just think what the piece will look like at the end, Grain pattern and colour. Birch is a nice wood to turn, it really just depends what you have available in the workshop or the garden. You can turn this from wet wet/green wood also,

Hollowing tools are really only needed for narrow neck hollow forms. This project you want to do is more of a cup of goblet form, therefore no special tools required.

Take a look on You Tube and search for turning, Goblets, cups etcetera, I am sure you will find some short videos to assist you in your project.

Good luck

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Douglas Bordner's profile

Douglas Bordner

4024 posts in 4146 days


#8 posted 03-16-2008 02:58 PM

I would add that if you choose to bore it out with a Forstner your chances of perfect concentricity with the turning will be best achieved by boring it out while chucked using a Jacobs chuck in the tailstock, utilizing the lathe as a horizontal boring tool.

-- "Bordnerizing" perfectly good lumber for over a decade.

View refueler1's profile

refueler1

7 posts in 3992 days


#9 posted 03-17-2008 12:56 PM

Hello Tony, Thanks for the info. As for using Bass, I am not concerned with grain pattern because I plan on woodburning or carving some artwork around the outside of it thats why I was hoping I could use bass wood since it burns easily.

Doug, I would like to bore the hole on the lathe but I have to get a jacobs chuck first. Also need to get some type of a scroll chuck. Can’t get either one till after April since LOML’s birthday and our Anniverssary are close and if I buy me another tool before then…well she would probably glue my hands together in my sleep so I chouldn’t use the lathe again!

-- MSgt Crew Chief, USAF Ret. "No One Kicks A** Without Tanker Gas"

View Alin Dobra's profile

Alin Dobra

351 posts in 3971 days


#10 posted 03-17-2008 05:20 PM

refueler1,

Unless you want to have some kind of glass tube inserted or make a piston inside, I would not use a drill bit to make the hole. A nice version of the piece you are trying to make would have uniform wall thickness, which means that it cannot be made with a Forstner bit. In terms of speed, I would prefer the bowl gouge any time. I have seen it done with a Forstner bit and it is way too slow (you have to take a little at the time otherwise you will burn and overheat the bit.
Also, since hollowing with machines (except straight holes) is difficult to impossible, the piece will look hand made not machine made if you make the wall thickness uniform (or close to it).

In terms of what wood to turn, I would stay away from pine or soft woods. How well a type of wood turns does not necessarily depends on how soft it is. You probably need sharper tools and better technique to turn soft woods (that is definitely true for pine). I would probably start with oak or cherry.

Alin

-- -- Alin Dobra, Gainesville, Florida

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refueler1

7 posts in 3992 days


#11 posted 03-18-2008 03:58 AM

Guess I will just have to save up for a scroll chuck. I have a bowl gouge but I think it is a small one, maybe 3/8ths? Know anyone with an fairly priced scroll chuck?

Thanks, Jack.

-- MSgt Crew Chief, USAF Ret. "No One Kicks A** Without Tanker Gas"

View Alin Dobra's profile

Alin Dobra

351 posts in 3971 days


#12 posted 03-18-2008 07:20 PM

refueler1,

I use face plates (30$ for a good one). You do not necessarily need a chuck. Glue a piece of soft wood (studs are good) on the bottom of the blank and screw the faceplate into it. You can part off the piece when you are done. I find the faceplates very convenient and I use them exclusively together with 1” sheet metal screws (5$ buy 50 that last at least 1 year).

Alin

-- -- Alin Dobra, Gainesville, Florida

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refueler1

7 posts in 3992 days


#13 posted 03-19-2008 12:54 AM

I guess using faceplates save from having to make tenons for the chuck. My lathe came with a 3” FP. How big of a FP is considered a standard?

-- MSgt Crew Chief, USAF Ret. "No One Kicks A** Without Tanker Gas"

View teenagewoodworker's profile

teenagewoodworker

2727 posts in 3851 days


#14 posted 03-19-2008 02:04 AM

I’ve seen a termite turning tool in my Rockler catalog that says it is good for end grain and i saw it used somewhere and it looked good. you might want to check that out. here is the link.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18432&filter=termite

View David's profile

David

203 posts in 3798 days


#15 posted 03-30-2008 03:33 AM

On the issue of making it concentric; I have made a plug for the open end and to put the tail stock center in while turning the outside after the hole was made by whatever method you choose. By supporting the open end there is less chance of breaking the blank. Make the plug with a flange or it will get shoved into the opening and you’ll never get it out.

-- Islandwoodworker@Gmail.com

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