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Forum topic by Karda posted 02-10-2018 06:32 PM 919 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1076 posts in 553 days


02-10-2018 06:32 PM

I have a question for those who use and like skews. I have an oval skew but can’t find any tips on sharpening it. I know they rock but also mine have a very long angle. I do it as I can but I don’t know what is right thsanks Mike


25 replies so far

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Woodknack

11626 posts in 2379 days


#1 posted 02-10-2018 07:04 PM

The longer the bevel, the better it will cut soft wood but will also dull faster and arguably catches easier. Shorter bevels will stay sharp longer etc. I have half a dozen skews, or more, and they are all sharpened at different angles.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Kelly

2030 posts in 2943 days


#2 posted 02-10-2018 07:04 PM

I don’t have any oval skews, but after looking around on line, it appears they’d sharpen just like any other skew, if you could keep them stable.

You could make a simple clamp from wood. The bottom piece of the clamp would have the flat surface to run on your tool rest. A screw and a knob on each end would allow you to clamp the skew and hold its edge parallel to the wheel or belt. I’d just carve a slight cup into the bottom piece of, say, 3/4” wood so the thing would be less likely to roll off parallel.

To set the skew up for sharpening, I’d do the felt tip marker thing, insert the skew into the holder, rest it on the wheel and clamp it. Turn the wheel by hand to see if you have the angle you want (removal of the felt tip marker). When happy, go for it.

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Karda

1076 posts in 553 days


#3 posted 02-10-2018 10:52 PM

thats basically what I am doing now but no clamp. I like a longer bevel. for some reason I can’t get a short bevel as sharp as it should be. I grind to about 30 degrees but that don’t seem to work as well as longer. would I be ok in grinding a shorter bevel on the edge

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Kelly

2030 posts in 2943 days


#4 posted 02-11-2018 02:16 AM

The more I learn about turning, the more I learn you are doing it right for you. If you have the best control with a longer bevel, you must be about right.

A lot of people like a secondary bevel. Nothing wrong with experimenting. My Benjamin’s Best knives have gotten a lot shorter in a few short years. I’m pretty close to where I want to be on the skews, spindle gouges and rouging gouges. Haven’t done much on bowls, so that’s all still in the experimental stage.

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Karda

1076 posts in 553 days


#5 posted 02-11-2018 03:42 AM

I am learning to get the bevel I want on my regular skew but the oval it harder because to follow the original bevel the blade contacts at the top of the wheel,

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Kelly

2030 posts in 2943 days


#6 posted 02-11-2018 05:37 PM

Are you free handing or using a jig when you sharpen your knives?

I use the Wolverine Jig with my grinder. The bar lets me get far enough back, even on long handled knives, landing at the top of the wheel isn’t a problem.

A few places on line show how to make your own. Captain Eddy comes to mind. He has a lot of good information, as do others.

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Karda

1076 posts in 553 days


#7 posted 02-11-2018 05:50 PM

Hi, I free hand my skews because I use a radius grind similar to the Lacer grind. You can’t do that on a jig. At this point I only use the straight skew for doing the dovetail on recesses. Maybe I’ll have to use a jig for my oval

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Kelly

2030 posts in 2943 days


#8 posted 02-11-2018 06:47 PM

I haven’t gotten around to it yet, but I plan on scribbing some permanent lines into my support plate to make clear the location of the 90, the 45’s and so on. If nothing else, they’d provide good reference points for starting and ending grinds like you’re describing.

Generally, 50 to 90 percent of my grinding is freehand, since I’m spending only seconds to touch up a tip. I don’t use the jig until I’ve well established how sloppy I can be free handing.

Sometimes, the knife is too short or the handle and such otherwise get in the way of laying the knife flat on the rest. When it does, I have to mount a block of wood to raise the knife, say 1/4”, so the blade stock remains parallel to the rest.

On a side note, people can say what they want about muscle memory and free hand, but those who do cannot claim to be expert at: 1) pocket knives; 2) [various] kitchen knives; 3) every wood lathe knife; 4) lawn mower blades; 5) chisels; 6) hand plane blades; 7). . . .

__
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZ6trlIHF68&feature=youtu.be&t=53s

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Woodknack

11626 posts in 2379 days


#9 posted 02-12-2018 05:46 AM

:) This turning text from 1850 should clear things up.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Karda

1076 posts in 553 days


#10 posted 02-12-2018 06:25 AM

i don’t get it, I do understand the 2 angle for skew but does that include gouges as well

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msinc

384 posts in 503 days


#11 posted 02-12-2018 01:03 PM

I only use the one angle on my turning tools. It is my understanding that, for cutting tools in general, two angles serves to allow a shallower {maybe shallow is not the word} main grind with less of an angle at the edge to help provide one that lasts longer. Example, a knife blade ground on 15 degrees for the main blade would quickly dull in use because that is too sharp {or shallow} and too thin at the cutting edge. So, to help it last a little longer in use the final second angle is ground to 20 or 25 degrees.
I use one angle on all my turning tools, it’s not as if they last or stay super sharp very long anyways. They are easier to sharpen with one angle and especially a skew, to me, needs just one because you start out with the bevel rubbing and raise it to a cut. I don’t really find my skews getting dull very fast, in fact I almost never put them to the grinder…I just do a frequent whetting on the stone. Just my opinion and what works for me….take it for what it’s worth.

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LeeMills

543 posts in 1300 days


#12 posted 02-12-2018 03:58 PM



:) This turning text from 1850 should clear things up.
- Rick_M

Rick, is that from Holtzapffel?

Nothing against the oval skew but I prefer the flat.
Mine are about 20 deg per side or 40 deg inclusive.
If you have watched Lacer’s full video (The Sweet Side, The Dark Side?) he does suggest a straight grind for beginners even though he promotes the curved blade.
I reground one of mine to a curved edge and could find no benefit for me so I went back to straight. I like the straight better for turning beads with the short point.
I hone mine so they only go to the grinder maybe just once a year and then only to deepen the hollow grind to make honing easier and quicker. Usually takes me about 15 seconds to hone since it is straight; if I had to work around a curve honing would take me much longer.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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Woodknack

11626 posts in 2379 days


#13 posted 02-12-2018 06:21 PM


Rick, is that from Holtzapffel?

- LeeMills

It is. I mostly posted it as a joke because of the old fashioned way of phrasing things but it does mention grind angles.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Karda

1076 posts in 553 days


#14 posted 02-12-2018 06:56 PM

Yea Lee that old composition was something else I think the rule was to to use a paragraph to say what can be said in a sentence but old English is much worse. I use curved skew because I don’t get as many catches I have an oval skew because that is what I bought first, not knowing any better. I do like it but is difficult to sharpen. I haven’t got the knack of honing yet. When ever I hone I usually have to put it on the grinder to get the edge back. next time I am going to try a marker and see what I am doing wrong

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LeeMills

543 posts in 1300 days


#15 posted 02-12-2018 10:30 PM


I have an oval skew because that is what I bought first, not knowing any better. I do like it but is difficult to sharpen. I haven t got the knack of honing yet. When ever I hone I usually have to put it on the grinder to get the edge back. next time I am going to try a marker and see what I am doing wrong
- Karda

I don’t think there is any “not knowing better”. If you ask turners for their recommendation for learning videos one of the top three usually includes Keith Rowley’s A Foundation Course. Keith like many other fine turners prefer the oval skew. I have no problem with the oval skew but flat was what I bought first and learned with. I don’t think I will ever wear mine down to unusable so I may never buy another.

Just in radius vs straight there may be some benefits to both. With the radius with a peeling cut you can only get so much tool into the wood as it curves away. With my straight I have to be more careful of the entire tool width may make contact.

This is a video by Alan Lacer on sharpening and honing the skew. If having to go back to the grinder after honing it sounds like you are coming off of the back (heel) of the bevel and rounding over the cutting edge. Just a wag. An important part to me is anchoring the tool handle to yourself or bench so it can not move. If both the tool and hone can move it is much more difficult to keep control.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dmCxDToHm6Y

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

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