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5HP Sawstop VS 7.5HP

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Forum topic by JoeyKochlacs posted 02-06-2018 07:21 PM 1090 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JoeyKochlacs

3 posts in 308 days


02-06-2018 07:21 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw sawstop

Hello,

First off, I have 3 phase.

Second, my next door shop neighbor cut a bunch of fingers off and my shopmate just nicked 3 of his to the bone but no worse. Meaning I don’t give a hoot about the ethics of Sawstop’s owner/inventor trying to take over the industry compared to how I value my fingers and not getting sued and put out of business or losing my house. I sell lumber out of my shop too, which means there is foot traffic liability at times on top of renting it with 2 other guys.

Third, I am a professional furniture maker and sawyer. Which means I cut thick stuff, a lot.

So now that I have that out of the way, is there really any reason to upgrade from 5hp to 7.5hp. It costs $500 more, which I’d gladly pay if I will realistically see any performance improvement.

I currently have a 24” planer that is 5hp, 3 phase, and it planes off 1/8” at the full 24” no problem, on hardwoods. It can do like 1/4” on narrower, softer stock. So it’s hard for me to imagine I’d need more power than that on a 10” tablesaw.

Thoughts? Any good reason to go up to 7.5hp? Perhaps it leaves cleaner cuts by virtue of going faster while cross cutting?

Thanks


15 replies so far

View jonah's profile

jonah

1917 posts in 3497 days


#1 posted 02-06-2018 07:27 PM

It doesn’t go faster. There’s no reason in the world to need more than 5hp on a 10” saw.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3846 days


#2 posted 02-06-2018 07:43 PM

With a 10” blade I don’t see much advantage
to going over 5hp.

If you were running 12” or 14” blades I would
say go for it. I have a 12” saw with a 4 horse
motor and I’m not thrilled with the power.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5173 posts in 2692 days


#3 posted 02-06-2018 07:46 PM

I can’t even imagine why a larger-than-5HP motor would be needed on a 10” saw.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View buckbuster31's profile

buckbuster31

254 posts in 714 days


#4 posted 02-06-2018 07:50 PM

I have a 3hp sawstop and it is way more than enough

View Holt's profile

Holt

279 posts in 2828 days


#5 posted 02-06-2018 08:12 PM

Does more HP make a significant difference cutting dadoes? Maybe let you cut a wide dado all in one pass? Only thing I could think of that might make a difference…

-- ...Specialization is for insects.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1917 posts in 3497 days


#6 posted 02-06-2018 08:29 PM

I’ve cut 3/4” wide, 1/2” deep dados in one pass before on my 3hp Unisaw. I’ve never had to cut more than a ~1/2” deep dado.

I can’t imagine not having enough power with a 5hp motor. Certainly not with 10” blades.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1413 posts in 1423 days


#7 posted 02-06-2018 08:38 PM

I think 5hp should be sufficient, even with the hardest woods.

I have a sliding tablesaw with a 5hp motor and I have not had any issues cutting thick pieces of very dense and hard woods.

As for dadoes, I could see it helping and I rarely use a dado stack but is it wise to cut a deep dado in one pass even if you have the power? I would think it would be better to at least take 2 passes just for a cleaner cut. That’s just a guess on my part so if anyone does know, chime in.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5173 posts in 2692 days


#8 posted 02-06-2018 09:41 PM

Mine is 5 HP, and I can’t really see much difference between my old 3 HP and this one with full width dados, but I didn’t really try any measurements. I suppose if you cut really deep ones it might go a little faster.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

326 posts in 2480 days


#9 posted 02-06-2018 10:36 PM

For the sake of sharing safety information, what were these two doing (types of cut) when the accidents occurred?

-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

388 posts in 1158 days


#10 posted 02-06-2018 11:10 PM

No..Just use correct blades…

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

318 posts in 2049 days


#11 posted 02-06-2018 11:32 PM

Save your money or better yet, reinvest into something you really need. Bear in mind that if you cut dados you will need the dado brake cartridge. Get spare cartridges right away. You can thank me later. Also if the brake cartridge engages a blade, it often destroys the blade. So hopefully you have plenty of blades too. My last suggestion is this: These saws are very well built but they have one common issue in production shops. They often buildup and retain sawdust around the lift & tilt mechanisms. This in-turn will limit them to less than maximum range. Connect your DC hose directly to the cabinet as well as have a section connected from the saw blade dust chute to the cabinet exhaust chute as pictured in the owners manual. It is something that many don’t do because they often don’t read the manual and or assume that the machine would come with the hose needed but it doesnt. Good luck and I’m very sorry to hear of the safety issues you’ve been experiencing.

View JoeyKochlacs's profile

JoeyKochlacs

3 posts in 308 days


#12 posted 02-07-2018 12:50 AM

This sounds like it’s settled, then.

I’ll be getting the 5 hp. I think I answered my own question when discussing it’s as powerful as my 24” planer, but wanted to hear other people say so as well.

Thank you all for your input.

View JoeyKochlacs's profile

JoeyKochlacs

3 posts in 308 days


#13 posted 02-07-2018 01:04 AM


For the sake of sharing safety information, what were these two doing (types of cut) when the accidents occurred?

- Chris Cook


Good question.

Next door shop neighbor cut his fingers off years ago while cutting a bunch of frame and panel door parts. He says he was just in a groove of repetitiveness and swiped his hand across the blade. Too comfortable. He bought a SawStop thereafter.

Shopmate was cutting a bunch of boards for a vaulted ceiling and showed me how he was cutting them. He said he was pressing the wood against the blade (you know, the blade, not the fence in front of the blade) with his left hand (and telling me this as if it is the correct way to do it) when he let go and swiped his left hand across the blade.

Note to everyone, you don’t push the wood into the blade! You push it into the fence in front of the blade. Like, for one, you make it more likely to do what he did and cut your hand off, but also, that increases the risk of kickback.

He is likely moving next door in a few months. I hope it happens for liability but also because I need more space to have a slab and lumber showroom.

View Chris Cook's profile

Chris Cook

326 posts in 2480 days


#14 posted 02-07-2018 10:48 PM

Thanks for that! I think it’s important to know, not for gross curiosity, but because sometimes you are surprised to learn something you should have known.

I think it’s very important to have a steady work pace in the shop. being very deliberate and not hasty at all.

For the sake of sharing safety information, what were these two doing (types of cut) when the accidents occurred?

- Chris Cook

Good question.

Next door shop neighbor cut his fingers off years ago while cutting a bunch of frame and panel door parts. He says he was just in a groove of repetitiveness and swiped his hand across the blade. Too comfortable. He bought a SawStop thereafter.

Shopmate was cutting a bunch of boards for a vaulted ceiling and showed me how he was cutting them. He said he was pressing the wood against the blade (you know, the blade, not the fence in front of the blade) with his left hand (and telling me this as if it is the correct way to do it) when he let go and swiped his left hand across the blade.

Note to everyone, you don t push the wood into the blade! You push it into the fence in front of the blade. Like, for one, you make it more likely to do what he did and cut your hand off, but also, that increases the risk of kickback.

He is likely moving next door in a few months. I hope it happens for liability but also because I need more space to have a slab and lumber showroom.

- JoeyKochlacs


-- Chris, "all we are is sawdust in the dust collector""

View Holt's profile

Holt

279 posts in 2828 days


#15 posted 02-11-2018 07:27 PM

I always break up my routine, whether it’s cutting a bunch of identical parts or driving to work. Muscle memory will get you into trouble in some situations.


Good question.

Next door shop neighbor cut his fingers off years ago while cutting a bunch of frame and panel door parts. He says he was just in a groove of repetitiveness and swiped his hand across the blade. Too comfortable. He bought a SawStop thereafter.


-- ...Specialization is for insects.

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