LumberJocks

cutting a circle in a laminate counter top

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by theshed posted 02-06-2018 11:27 AM 1315 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View theshed's profile

theshed

15 posts in 491 days


02-06-2018 11:27 AM

I am cutting an old piece of laminate counter top that will eventually be the frame for a clock. I am using a router. I have never cut laminate. All cut edges will be exposed. I have 3 questions.
1) What type of router bit do I use?
2) Will/can the laminate chip?
3) Do I need to tape the cut lines?


10 replies so far

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1740 posts in 3009 days


#1 posted 02-06-2018 12:19 PM

bandsaw would be best…...with laminate up

just pin the radius from the bottom of the substrate ( not completely through )

place the pin on your mark on the bandsaw table…( ply overlay on saw table top )

You will need to cut a relief first to allow you to start at the line or simply freehand far enough to allow you to drop into your radius mark

View theshed's profile

theshed

15 posts in 491 days


#2 posted 02-06-2018 12:22 PM

the clock face will be inset into the laminate frame. That needs to be cut with a router.

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1740 posts in 3009 days


#3 posted 02-06-2018 12:35 PM

Oh….I see…...sometimes it helps if you put some criteria like that in your post to aid in getting more accurate relplys

Thats an easy one

Enjoy !

View theshed's profile

theshed

15 posts in 491 days


#4 posted 02-06-2018 12:48 PM

I know how to do it, my original question was will the laminate chip using a router?

View jbay's profile

jbay

2872 posts in 1099 days


#5 posted 02-06-2018 02:27 PM

1/4” straight bit
No, but yes it could if not executed skillfully
No
I would make 3 passes, lowering the bit each pass.

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3170 posts in 1680 days


#6 posted 02-06-2018 03:44 PM

Laminate is pretty resistant to chipping as long as the bit is sharp you will be fine.

Rather than cuting the circle out with a router bit, I would cut it close to final dimension with a jigsaw and use a template and pattern bit. The more passes you make the more potential for chipping one little error or hiccup and you’re done.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View theshed's profile

theshed

15 posts in 491 days


#7 posted 02-06-2018 04:20 PM

Thanks for the comments. Always learning something. I decided to go for it with the router using a double flute straight bit. Worked well.

View LesB's profile

LesB

1863 posts in 3643 days


#8 posted 02-06-2018 10:15 PM

I agree with rwe2156 but I think you might also use a spiral bit. If you are cutting from the laminate side you would want a down cutting spiral bit to avoid lifting the laminate while cutting. If cutting from the other side you would want a up cut bit.

-- Les B, Oregon

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

388 posts in 1159 days


#9 posted 02-06-2018 11:13 PM


Laminate is pretty resistant to chipping as long as the bit is sharp you will be fine.

Rather than cuting the circle out with a router bit, I would cut it close to final dimension with a jigsaw and use a template and pattern bit. The more passes you make the more potential for chipping one little error or hiccup and you re done.

- rwe2156

Incorrect… Just use the router…A plunge router

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1139 posts in 1016 days


#10 posted 02-07-2018 03:01 PM

The original poster didn’t provide enough information initially to understand what he was talking about. This happens all the time. It is a hazard of purely textual communication. As someone said, “the biggest problem with communication is the assumption that it has actually occurred”.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com