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Why would a band saw bog down?

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Forum topic by WannaBBetter posted 02-06-2018 01:38 AM 632 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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WannaBBetter

79 posts in 2828 days


02-06-2018 01:38 AM

I have an antique delta 14” band saw 1940-50 had a 1/3 hp. I just put a 1/2 hp motor on it. I tried to slice some snowflakes I had laying around and it is still bogging down. Any thoughts would be very helpful. I thank you all in advance

-- I cut it three times and it's still too short


13 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3674 days


#1 posted 02-06-2018 01:54 AM

Old blade?

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9608 posts in 1512 days


#2 posted 02-06-2018 02:04 AM



Old blade?

- Loren

Ditto.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Rich

2988 posts in 615 days


#3 posted 02-06-2018 05:31 AM

Is it a capacitor motor, or a fan motor? I replaced the 1/4 horse Westinghouse that was original on my early-50s Atlas Press Co band saw with a 1/2 horse fan motor and was very disappointed with the performance. Fortunately I had a Dayton 3/4 horse motor from the ‘70s, made in the USA, still new in the box (thanks dad). It made all the difference.

Like the others said, the blade matters too. I resaw a lot of mesquite and can tell when it’s time to retire the blade. Not because the saw is bogging down, but because I’m having to push the wood too hard into the blade.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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WannaBBetter

79 posts in 2828 days


#4 posted 02-06-2018 12:26 PM

No the blade is not old. I replaced the original 1/3 hp motor with a brand new out of the box 1/2 hp

-- I cut it three times and it's still too short

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

56 posts in 1146 days


#5 posted 02-06-2018 12:46 PM

I’d expect to have to take it pretty easy resawing with 1/2 HP on a 14” saw.

My 14” Delta bandsaw has a 1-1/2 HP motor and I still need to take it slow and easy when resawing some wood of much thickness. I do a lot of resawing and my setup works fine but if I rush it I can still bog it down fairly easily. I don’t think I’d be happy with 1/2 HP on my saw.

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RogerM

792 posts in 2425 days


#6 posted 02-06-2018 04:15 PM

Motor much too small!!!

-- Roger M, Aiken, SC

View Rich's profile

Rich

2988 posts in 615 days


#7 posted 02-06-2018 04:51 PM


No the blade is not old. I replaced the original 1/3 hp motor with a brand new out of the box 1/2 hp

- WannaBBetter

Not all motors are suitable for the job. That’s why I asked what type it is.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6766 posts in 2225 days


#8 posted 02-06-2018 05:54 PM

For the machine in question, Delta recommended (in the manual) a 1/3hp motor for “most work around the small work-shop”, and a 1/2hp motor for steady production work, when using wide blades, or whenever the riser block is used for cutting thick and heavy stock. It is the blade that does the work, so I’d look there first. I’d also check the condition of the bearings given the age of the machine – have you ever replaced them?

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Harryn

64 posts in 2614 days


#9 posted 02-06-2018 08:33 PM

Make sure the motor is set up for the correct voltage. It may be set for 240 and you are using 120.

View LDO2802's profile

LDO2802

159 posts in 456 days


#10 posted 02-06-2018 08:41 PM

Could be belt slippage as well. Make sure the belt from the motor to the wheel has proper tension.

View PeteStaehling's profile

PeteStaehling

56 posts in 1146 days


#11 posted 02-06-2018 09:58 PM



For the machine in question, Delta recommended (in the manual) a 1/3hp motor for “most work around the small work-shop”, and a 1/2hp motor for steady production work, when using wide blades, or whenever the riser block is used for cutting thick and heavy stock.

Is there something about the saws or motors from that period that makes those recommendations make sense? Most 14” saws these days come with at least a 1 HP motor, and many of them have more powerful motors.

As I said my 14” 1990 Delta has a 1.5 HP motor and it is definitely not overpowered. No way would I want to do my re-sawing with 1.5 HP (Delta) motor in my saw.

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WannaBBetter

79 posts in 2828 days


#12 posted 02-07-2018 12:42 AM

Rich it is a capacitor motor. I an able to wire it 110or 220 and reverse direction. I have it wired 110 proper direction.

PeteStaehling I have not tried to re-saw it just never had the power.

LDO2802 I have a link belt proper tension doesn’t slip

MrUnix I never thought about the bearings. Maybe?

-- I cut it three times and it's still too short

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WannaBBetter

79 posts in 2828 days


#13 posted 02-07-2018 12:47 AM

This is the snowflake I tried to slice Point to Point it is 2 3/4 inces

-- I cut it three times and it's still too short

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