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Routing a round over

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Forum topic by siouxdawgs0409 posted 04-04-2011 10:50 PM 2170 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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siouxdawgs0409

107 posts in 1841 days


04-04-2011 10:50 PM

Ok so this is usually a fairly straight forward thing….

I have a piece of 3/4 in stock. I want to round over the front of it….now the catch…it has a radius in it, otherwords it is not a straight piece.

The problem I am running into is that I can not use my fence as a guide since it is radiused and am using a pin to guide it. When I go to round over the top side it works fine and the bearing on the bit runs on the piece but when I flip the board to round the bottom side the bearing rides a little further in, cutting deeper, due to the removed material from rounding the top. I know there is probably special bits or something but I am looking for a simpler fix.

or do you just sand out the little “indent” from the one cut? Maybe a different size roundover bit? one that the bearing would ride directly in the center of the board.


11 replies so far

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a1Jim

112862 posts in 2324 days


#1 posted 04-04-2011 11:03 PM

This should fix that., after you route the one side flip it over on top of a 1/4 piece of stock to raise it up then you will have a edge for your bearing to run on. It your round overs are not the same use the 1/4” piece on both sides.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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siouxdawgs0409

107 posts in 1841 days


#2 posted 04-05-2011 01:24 AM

If i do that the rounder over is not the same radius on the bottom side due to the height difference on the piece. I think I get what you are saying but maybe I do not. I am using a 1/2 inch radius roundover if that helps. would it be easier with a 3/8 inch roundover since it would be exactly half way?

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a1Jim

112862 posts in 2324 days


#3 posted 04-05-2011 01:29 AM

Yes it helps Rarely do you need that big of radius. you can also lower your bit in the router table or as I suggested using the 1/4 shim on both sides.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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GaryL

1080 posts in 1577 days


#4 posted 04-05-2011 01:33 AM

If your trying to acheive a full bead/bullnose on your 3/4” pc. you should be using a 3/8 roundover bit. You may still get a small edge on the second pass but it should be small enough to sand out.
On your pass on the second side, do it in two passes. Set your final depth so your just taking a small amount off. This will reduce the amount of force on the bearing pushing into the wood since only a small portion of the bearing is making contact. This will reduce the “dent” the bearing will want to make.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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GaryL

1080 posts in 1577 days


#5 posted 04-05-2011 01:37 AM

Jim….I assume you are talking of using a pattern that matches the radius of the work piece?

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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siouxdawgs0409

107 posts in 1841 days


#6 posted 04-05-2011 01:48 AM

Yes that is the term, bullnose…

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ScottN

261 posts in 1426 days


#7 posted 04-05-2011 02:35 AM

I know what your talking about and I’ve done this plenty of times on stair nosing and some furniture tops where I have a 1/4” on top and a 1/2” on the bottom. The only way I could do this is using a fence on the router table. Bringing the fence out flush with the roller bearing.

Why cant you use your Fence as a guide. confused…

-- New Auburn,WI

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siouxdawgs0409

107 posts in 1841 days


#8 posted 04-05-2011 02:56 AM

it is not a straight piece…It has an arc or curve to it.

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lanwater

3100 posts in 1681 days


#9 posted 04-05-2011 07:35 AM

- If the piece is circular than use a “v” jig setup:
2 pieces of strait wood clamped as a “V” with the router bit at the botoom of the “V”.
Now you have 3 point of contact and you can round over both sides.

-If the piece just has a radius like a regular arc, you need a fence that fit that outside radius.
Usually the rest of the piece you cut that original piece from.
make a cutout for the bit align the bearing with this fence and slide you piece through.

- You could also attach 2 small bearing onto 2 sticks (1 per).
position those 2 a little ahead of the bit so that the bearing form a triangle and clamp them.
that will give you the 3 point of contact and allow you to roundover almost any curved piece.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

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ScottN

261 posts in 1426 days


#10 posted 04-07-2011 01:33 AM

sorry descout…I must have skipped that paragraph.

-- New Auburn,WI

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verdesardog

105 posts in 1358 days


#11 posted 04-08-2011 04:28 PM

hmmmm 1/2 round over to make a bull nose on 3/4”? last time I checked 1/2 +1/2 = 1, you are trying to put a 1” bull nose on 3/4 stock. That will work if you don’t use the whole 1/2”. But if you want a true 3/4 diameter curve on the edge of your board, like a previous poster said use a 3/8 rounover, 3/8+ 3/8 = 3/4.

-- .. heyoka ..

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