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Forum topic by needshave posted 02-05-2018 06:17 AM 549 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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needshave

175 posts in 2075 days


02-05-2018 06:17 AM

Topic tags/keywords: wood syp heartwood question

I have attempted to attach two pictures to this posting. The pictures are of wood floors in an 1850 Gothic revival home that I’m restoring. I’m trying to determine what kind fo wood the floors were made of. The first is in a bedroom the 2nd in a kitchen-the rest of the house is oak and heartwood /SYP.

Appreciate your help.


20 replies so far

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4353 posts in 2425 days


#1 posted 02-05-2018 09:51 AM

I don’t know. But in 1850 there a pretty good chance they used a local wood source. I’m guessing the house isn’t located in the middle of death valley. Maybe you could give a location of the house. It may help track down the type of Alder it is.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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knotscott

8120 posts in 3492 days


#2 posted 02-05-2018 10:27 AM

Kinda hard to tell, but I’d guess oak or chestnut for the top one.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1766 posts in 2592 days


#3 posted 02-05-2018 12:20 PM

Could also be ash.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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needshave

175 posts in 2075 days


#4 posted 02-05-2018 03:18 PM

The boards are 6” wide, tongue and groove. All of the boards have a lot of knots (both pictures) dark red in color ( wood has been stained at some point) The board in the top picture can be seen from the basement, it is planed on the walking surface but rough sawn on the bottom seating surface. With the door casing out, the boards measure 1.25 in thickness. it holds up very well and appears, to me to wear like oak but look like a pine. It’s pretty hard.

The second board I can not see the bottom side of, but it is softer., plenty of knots all very solid and firm. Has a reddish look to the grain and knots. This floor may be an overlay.

The house is located in Central Ohio. I will try and get some better pictures.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

808 posts in 1335 days


#5 posted 02-05-2018 03:29 PM



-the rest of the house is oak and heartwood /SYP

- needshave

id take a gander to guess ya have those 2 in the pics

View Alex Lane's profile

Alex Lane

515 posts in 4006 days


#6 posted 02-05-2018 03:29 PM

An old timer who worked on our 1919 house said the original trim may have been sassafras. All I know is that it turns any nail into a noodle if you don’t drill a pilot hole

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10091 posts in 1602 days


#7 posted 02-05-2018 04:17 PM

Ash alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View needshave's profile

needshave

175 posts in 2075 days


#8 posted 02-05-2018 10:08 PM

Fridge,

Do you think both of those are Alder?

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1113 posts in 1025 days


#9 posted 02-05-2018 11:08 PM



Fridge,

Do you think both of those are Alder?

- needshave

To TheFridge, everything is Alder! To TheFridge “Alder World’s a Stage”!

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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TheFridge

10091 posts in 1602 days


#10 posted 02-05-2018 11:39 PM

Ashy alder of course

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

18842 posts in 1973 days


#11 posted 02-06-2018 12:14 AM

Top looks like oak, although one board could be walnut.
Bottom picture looks like white pine.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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needshave

175 posts in 2075 days


#12 posted 02-06-2018 12:16 AM

So I have been doing some research on ALder online. I personally have not seen it for sale at our local sawmill hardwood supplier. He sells wood primarily grown in this region. Research shows that it is primarily grown in the pacific northwest. Being in Ohio, and Built-in 1850, Alder may not been immediately available in this area, if what I read is true. I’m wondering if this might be an ash?

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needshave

175 posts in 2075 days


#13 posted 02-06-2018 12:25 AM

Fire,

I think the second picture/boards is a pine. It has so many knots in it, it almost looks like knotty pine. It is quite beautiful though, has a very warm look to it. AS far as the first picture is concerned; all the boards are the same some boards do have a grain pattern similar to oak, but very knotty with red solid knots. I’m sure it was cut locally in the 1850’s and used. its a brick structure, but all the floor joists and roof members are oak and hickory.

View msinc's profile

msinc

497 posts in 620 days


#14 posted 02-06-2018 12:42 AM

Top one is definitely white oak. The bottom also looks like oak to me, just a different color stain. It would be very helpful if you could sand the second one down to bare wood and take the photo a little closer.

View Desert_Woodworker's profile

Desert_Woodworker

1590 posts in 1330 days


#15 posted 02-06-2018 12:53 AM



Ash alder.

- TheFridge

The proper order is Alder Ash

-- Desert_Woodworker

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