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Determining the Look of a Project?

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Forum topic by cowboyup3371 posted 02-05-2018 02:47 AM 543 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cowboyup3371

59 posts in 318 days


02-05-2018 02:47 AM

How do you determine what router profile, shape, scroll work, etc. you will use for a particular project? Although I try to figure out something nice to go with mine, I would like to move away from the safe things and try something different. Unfortunately, I don’t always know what would look best or how to get something done without wasting limited resources.

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way


11 replies so far

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wuddoc

311 posts in 3838 days


#1 posted 02-05-2018 03:41 AM

Your local library may have books on furniture and furniture design that you could check out and study.

I use to have students for their final undergraduate project create a scale model from foam core and balsa wood. They would include a hand shaped cutaway of the various profiles they were considering.

I wonder if a local evening class may have an art / design segment you could audit. If you have a woodworking store like Woodcraft / Rockler / Shopsmith they might offer a design class if enough people requested it.

In Indiana Marc Adams schools 2018 online brochure lists several design seminars. See website below and scroll down until you see the design section.

https://marcadams.com/workshops-by-subject/

-- Wuddoc

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GR8HUNTER

4574 posts in 833 days


#2 posted 02-05-2018 04:29 AM

i always search http://www.paxtonwood.com/profiles/overall/catalog.html :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Rich

3548 posts in 710 days


#3 posted 02-05-2018 04:59 AM

You can’t go wrong studying existing furniture. I find the “Images” tab on my favorite search engine to be invaluable. Whether it’s drawer construction, edge profiles, or whatever, there are thousands of examples you can study and learn from. Once you develop an eye for what works, you’re all set.

Proportions are one of the most challenging aspects of design — at least it appears that way based on many amateur designs. The Golden Ratio, or roughly 1.6:1 is one to keep in mind. So often when I’m putting a design together in SketchUp, and it just looks right, I can go and find examples of that ratio, or close to it, in segments of the project.

In the old days, ratios were everything. Rulers didn’t have numbers, and everything was simply a ratio. For example, a cabinet with drawers on the outside and doors in the middle might be a 30, 40, 30 percent ratio of the overall width. Note that the 60/40 ratio of the drawers to the doors isn’t too far off from the Golden Ratio.

Getting good balance is challenging. A fat cabinet with spindly legs looks bad, as does big old fat legs on a modest sized piece. That’s where studying existing furniture and developing an eye comes into play.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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JAAune

1826 posts in 2437 days


#4 posted 02-05-2018 05:10 AM

Study furniture that you like then try to determine what makes it “work”. Eventually you can develop a mental set of “rules” that will guide your decision-making process when you are trying to flesh out a design.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

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Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 768 days


#5 posted 02-05-2018 01:33 PM


How do you determine what router profile, shape, scroll work, etc. you will use for a particular project?

- cowboyup3371

Firstly, determine what period you are trying to emulate. There are distinct characteristics to each and every period of furniture. Search furniture styles  and study the differences. Gadrooning and barley twists look great on a Louis XIII or Reformation Era piece …
 

 
But would not fit at all on a William & Mary or Queen Anne piece …
 

 
... and an Arts & Craft piece may only have very slight ornamentation!
 

 
When using profiles, shapes, scroll work, and ornamentation … be careful not to mix periods!
 

 

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cowboyup3371

59 posts in 318 days


#6 posted 02-06-2018 03:31 AM

Ron, thank you for your advice and that is something I need to really start thinking about. Unfortunately, I have not actually tried to study or copy any style as I just normally build a basic project based on what’s in my head. This is actually part of my problem as I want to try to add some of the fanciness to my designs but don’t know how well it would work nor the confidence/understanding to recreate it.

Although I have the books that discuss the different design periods I’ll have to dig deeper on the reading of them.

Thank you again.

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

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TheFridge

10129 posts in 1606 days


#7 posted 02-06-2018 03:38 AM

I pick something to try with each project and progress with each in some way. Cabriolet legs. Then a little carving. All the while trying different techniques but not getting too carried away so I didnt get overwhelmed. And mistakes happen roll with them. Gotta learn somehow.

Learning some design is huge. Proportions must be pleasing.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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IantheTinker

249 posts in 247 days


#8 posted 02-06-2018 03:44 AM

I am with Rich on this one, searching the images tab online for what other folks have done is often inspiring to me. Gives me ideas, shows me things I have never even considered or didn’t know existed.

-- opiningminnesotan.com

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 768 days


#9 posted 02-06-2018 11:20 AM



Ron, thank you for your advice and that is something I need to really start thinking about. Unfortunately, I have not actually tried to study or copy any style as I just normally build a basic project based on what s in my head. This is actually part of my problem as I want to try to add some of the fanciness to my designs but don t know how well it would work nor the confidence/understanding to recreate it.

Although I have the books that discuss the different design periods I ll have to dig deeper on the reading of them.

Thank you again.

- cowboyup3371

Glad I could help. In your studies pay close attention to the timelines. There are hidden transition periods  where certain styles overlap slightly. As the tried and true is been held on to … someone comes along with a new idea. Just don’t get too carried away! Have fun!

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woodbutcherbynight

5545 posts in 2529 days


#10 posted 02-07-2018 03:48 AM

I use the A – Team method, just make it up as I go along then when I am done say, “I love it when a plan comes together.”

ROFLMAO

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Dark_Lightning

3225 posts in 3229 days


#11 posted 02-07-2018 04:49 AM

The look of a project also depends on the type of wood, with the grain in mind. I recently built a tool chest out of QSWO. If I had wanted to carve the exterior faces of the chest, I would not have used a highly figured wood, but would have used something like mahogany instead. Look at lots and lots of different pieces of furniture. One thing that I have noted is that the more intricate the style, the less there is of wood figure. There are always exceptions, though.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

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