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Need help with getting straight cuts on TS

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Forum topic by Joel_B posted 02-05-2018 02:01 AM 475 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Joel_B

342 posts in 1403 days


02-05-2018 02:01 AM

I am cutting some oak boards along the grain to edge glue for a table top.
I am using a Craftsman TS with Delta T Square fence and very good Freud thin kerf blade.
It seems that all my cuts are narrower towards the center of the board and wider at each end.
When I measure it with a feeler gauge and straight edge it is about .005” narrower in the center.
I am not sure if this a problem when edge gluing. It is really obvious when checking with a back lighted straight edge.
I checked the alignment of the fence to the blade and it is off about 0.010”
I do have access to a jointer so I could just use that to clean up the edges.
Thanks for any advice.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA


6 replies so far

View cowboyup3371's profile

cowboyup3371

59 posts in 219 days


#1 posted 02-05-2018 02:07 AM

You will want to use your joiner first to get a flat side and a straight edge before ever using your table saw. Once you have your straight edge on it, put it against the fence on your saw and cut the board to the desired width.

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5701 posts in 2835 days


#2 posted 02-05-2018 02:09 AM

Five thousandths of an inch is insignificant once the clamps come out.

That said, I do all my edge prep for panel glueups at the jointer. Layout your boards as they will be situated in the panel. Mark one board edge as “O” and the neighboring board edge as “I”. Continue labeling each board edge this way. Then joint the “O’s” with the top face outside or away from the jointer fence. The “I’s” get jointed with the top face inside or towards the jointer fence. This way even if your jointer fence is slightly off 90 degrees, the panel will still be perfectly flat.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Richard Lee's profile

Richard Lee

123 posts in 797 days


#3 posted 02-05-2018 02:12 AM

Or use a sled.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1234 posts in 2017 days


#4 posted 02-05-2018 02:15 AM

Check your technique as well. If you are going hand over hand to keep pushing the board through, typically in the middle of a long board, maybe you are pulling it off the fence by accident? Keep that pressure forward and towards the back corner of the fence.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Joel_B's profile

Joel_B

342 posts in 1403 days


#5 posted 02-05-2018 05:15 AM



Check your technique as well. If you are going hand over hand to keep pushing the board through, typically in the middle of a long board, maybe you are pulling it off the fence by accident? Keep that pressure forward and towards the back corner of the fence.

Brian

- bbasiaga

I thought this could be part of the problem, but i really tried to keep it against the fence. I also tried using a feather board but that did not help.

-- Joel, Encinitas, CA

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1358 posts in 942 days


#6 posted 02-06-2018 02:12 AM

Joel_B,

If the gap between two adjoining boards in a glue-up can be pulled tight together under hand pressure, the joints will likely fit tight together when edge glued.

The results off your table remind me of a spring joint; slightly narrower in the center (as determined along the length of the boards) than at the ends. Woodworkers who use the spring joint will take an otherwise straight edge and plane out a center hollow.

If interested, here is a description of the spring joint.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/2010/04/26/spring-joints-an-edge-glue-ups-best-friend

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