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Can't Figure This Tool Out

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Forum topic by jtrockboy posted 02-04-2018 03:26 PM 721 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtrockboy

9 posts in 310 days


02-04-2018 03:26 PM

New to the forum, which looks to have a lot of knowledgeable members, so I’m hoping someone can help me identify this tool. I inherited it from my Grandfather, who amassed his tools in the 40’s and 50’s, most of which were woodworking in nature. I’ve posted some pictures, and any help with identification would be greatly appreciated. My apologizes if I’m in the wrong forum.


12 replies so far

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

495 posts in 2522 days


#1 posted 02-04-2018 03:43 PM

I would say it is an antique iron. Handle is missing.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

477 posts in 400 days


#2 posted 02-04-2018 03:44 PM

looks to be an old veneer iron

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 580 days


#3 posted 02-04-2018 03:55 PM

Antique iron without the handle.

View jtrockboy's profile

jtrockboy

9 posts in 310 days


#4 posted 02-04-2018 04:12 PM

Iron was the first thing I thought, and used it in my initial research, but couldn’t find any matches. Might be a bit small for an iron as well. I’ve added a few pictures for size context. Also, I seem to recall when I first found it, it had an old string knot tied to the center post. Thanks for the responses, I very much appreciate the help.

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3054 posts in 2370 days


#5 posted 02-04-2018 04:14 PM

It’s an antique iron without the handle. The iron was heated on a stove handle attached and used as an iron when it cooled put back on stove handle removed and put on antoher iron that washeating in reserve.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1481 posts in 360 days


#6 posted 02-04-2018 04:24 PM

as said above: I see them at flea markets anywhere from 15-$75.
depends on the condition and how much the Snow Bird “hopes” to get for it.

this is the handle that goes with it. when the handles are gone, the iron is used for doorstops.

and for yours, with no handle and no makers identification marks,
it puts it in the $20 or less category.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View jtrockboy's profile

jtrockboy

9 posts in 310 days


#7 posted 02-04-2018 05:01 PM

Thanks so much for all the info. Would this be considered a “Sad Iron”?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1481 posts in 360 days


#8 posted 02-04-2018 05:28 PM

yes – this is only one style of the “Sad Clothes Iron”.

google it and you will see the various descriptions.

“Sad” is an Old English word for “solid,” and the term “sad iron” is often used to distinguish
the largest and heaviest of flat irons, usually 5 to 9 pounds. The forebears to modern electric irons,
these flat irons are often triangular or come to a point to make it easier to iron around buttons.

there are many on the auction sites such as Ebay, Amazon, Etsy, etc. to give you an idea of pricing it.

and on a “sad note”, it is sad that some folks around here can actually remember their parents
or grandparents using them in their daily routine of ironing clothes with these solid non-electric,
stove heated irons.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View jtrockboy's profile

jtrockboy

9 posts in 310 days


#9 posted 02-04-2018 05:41 PM



yes – this is only one style of the “Sad Clothes Iron”.

google it and you will see the various descriptions.

“Sad” is an Old English word for “solid,” and the term “sad iron” is often used to distinguish
the largest and heaviest of flat irons, usually 5 to 9 pounds. The forebears to modern electric irons,
these flat irons are often triangular or come to a point to make it easier to iron around buttons.

there are many on the auction sites such as Ebay, Amazon, Etsy, etc. to give you an idea of pricing it.

and on a “sad note”, it is sad that some folks around here actually remember their parents
or grandparents using them in their daily routine of ironing clothes with these solid non-electric,
stove heated irons.

- John Smith

GREAT info. Thank you! It’s good to finally figure out what this is.

I’ve got to say, this site is very impressive in look, feel, and knowledge base. Thanks to all.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10705 posts in 1684 days


#10 posted 02-04-2018 05:50 PM

I’m sure the handle was made of Alder.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4765 posts in 2507 days


#11 posted 02-04-2018 07:33 PM



I’m sure the handle was made of Alder.

- TheFridge

+1

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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TheFridge

10705 posts in 1684 days


#12 posted 02-04-2018 08:31 PM


I’m sure the handle was made of Alder.

- TheFridge
+1

- AlaskaGuy

+2 back at ya

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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