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Forum topic by AbbyL posted 02-01-2018 02:27 PM 1071 views 0 times favorited 28 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


02-01-2018 02:27 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tips cutting boards

I am currently making cutting boards. I’ve made a few before and have never gotten good joints. I cut all my 1” strips on a table saw. They were uneven so I put them through my planer a couple times. When I hold the pieces of wood together I can still see light through. How do I get a good joint before glue up?


28 replies so far

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

347 posts in 2662 days


#1 posted 02-01-2018 02:41 PM

I would get a razor sharp handplane and hit each side of a glue joint- think about it this way, your planer doesn’t cut flat, it takes thousands of scallops and scoops due to the circular cutting nature of the machine, so your mating surfaces are not getting full glue surface connection. Look down your components lengthwise and you will see the very so slight scallops….

Same technique for table top glue-up, or face mating glue-ups- once you get used to it, do spring joints to improve your strength and gluing accuracy.

Good luck!

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

188 posts in 730 days


#2 posted 02-01-2018 02:42 PM

Sounds like either your planner blades needs some adjusting or the opposite side of the boards are not flat causing it to rock as it goes through. If they are large boards and you have a jointer I would try that. Small you can use shims and hot glue to get them level on a flat surface like a scrap piece of mdf and pass them through the planer.

I recently had this happen to me on my planer and a wood chip had gotten under one of the blades making in convex. Still not sure how I pulled that off but was an easy fix.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3848 days


#3 posted 02-01-2018 02:50 PM

It seems likely to me that your pieces are
curving. They may also be coming out of
the planer thinner in the middle.

Glue joints can be refined by running the
parts over a jointer, using a router table
set up for edge jointing, jointing with a hand
plane, or even rubbing the parts back and
forth on a flat surface with sandpaper taped
to it.

Table saw methods like this may also
work.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

462 posts in 2770 days


#4 posted 02-01-2018 02:52 PM

I know I guy. Call me.

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


#5 posted 02-01-2018 02:58 PM

Loren I’ll try doing the sandpaper and table thing. I’m not experienced enough to know all the wood working terms. But the cheapest route is the best for me so I’ll give that try. What grit sand paper would work best?

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30054 posts in 2538 days


#6 posted 02-01-2018 03:01 PM

Welcome to Lumberjocks

Where are you located? If you’re close to many people here, I am sure someone would let you use a jointer.

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3848 days


#7 posted 02-01-2018 03:09 PM



Loren I’ll try doing the sandpaper and table thing. I’m not experienced enough to know all the wood working terms. But the cheapest route is the best for me so I’ll give that try.

- AbbyL

Try to make sure the surface is really flat. I
have a scrap of MDF with a length of 6”
sanding belt glued to it.

I wouldn’t do a whole batch without checking
the joints. If your sanding surface is out of
flat the first few joints will probably tell you.
If you have a stone counter top in the house
those tend to be pretty flat.

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AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


#8 posted 02-01-2018 03:10 PM

I am in Houston Texas. My countertops are old and uneven. Ahaha. I’ll test it out a couple times on my fold out table

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AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


#9 posted 02-01-2018 03:11 PM

Actually. I have a scrap piece of that stuff too. I’ll use that. Thanks. :)

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AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


#10 posted 02-01-2018 03:21 PM


This good right?

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3848 days


#11 posted 02-01-2018 03:26 PM

Yeah, that sort of thing exactly.

You can mark the wood with chalk or pencil
which makes it easy to see where material
is being removed by the sand paper.

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AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


#12 posted 02-01-2018 03:31 PM

When I clamp them together with my my hands I am now seeing no light.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

462 posts in 2770 days


#13 posted 02-01-2018 03:39 PM

no one mentioned it, but something may be off on your table saw, too. If the blade is not parallel to the fence, you could be getting cuts that aren’t square. If your blade is dull & you’re having to force the wood through, you could be putting uneven pressure on it/letting it come away from the fence.. That sort of thing..

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AbbyL

12 posts in 315 days


#14 posted 02-01-2018 03:41 PM

I don’t have my own table saw yet. I was using a family members one and it is very old and makes sounds it shouldn’t. I’ve learned my mistake with theses boards. One I need more practice with a table saw. Really all power tools and two get my own table saw.

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

43 posts in 322 days


#15 posted 02-01-2018 03:44 PM

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