LumberJocks

Can you see through the walls?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by Carloz posted 01-30-2018 02:20 AM 695 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 710 days


01-30-2018 02:20 AM

If so what is inside this short wall ? This is a mainstream “kitchen island” which is simply a couple of cabinets connected to this thing. There is water, sewage and electric lines insude this wall.
But how sturdy and usefull is it?
If you were to build a new kitchen island , which is wider than the existing one, which would encompass it, would you remove it completely or build around it?
In the first case the build is simpler but you have to deal with the communications. In the second case it is the opposite. What is the usual practice dealing with this?


8 replies so far

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

489 posts in 501 days


#1 posted 01-30-2018 02:58 AM

Post a picture of the entire island.
What is the end goal of having a larger island?

View B4B's profile

B4B

162 posts in 1477 days


#2 posted 01-30-2018 03:38 AM

Get a stud finder and locate the studs, if any. My aunt’s house was just a couple cabinets with a plywood back. Nothing fancy, and no sewer/water, just electric.

-- There's two routers in my vocab, one that moves data and one that removes wood, the latter being more relevant on this forum.

View sras's profile

sras

4874 posts in 3248 days


#3 posted 01-30-2018 04:55 AM

If the existing one is strong enough and there is no reason to tear it out, just add to it.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

943 posts in 1560 days


#4 posted 01-30-2018 05:19 AM

Carloz—I’ve been remodeling houses for about 40 years. I can’t literally see inside that wall, but what I would expect to find are 2×4 studs on 16” centers, with plumbing and wiring through and between them. The island cabinets are giving more “sturdiness” to the wall than the wall is giving to the cabinets.

The wall is mostly a chase for the utilities and a surface for the drywall. You can remove it, but you’ll still need a place for the plumbing and wiring. If you want to change the drywall to something else—or move the plumbing lines, you can certainly remove the wall and start fresh. But you won’t gain much extra space by removing the wall—- the pipes and wires have to be somewhere. The answer really depends on what you want to end up with.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

5250 posts in 2323 days


#5 posted 01-30-2018 06:34 AM

Buy an attachment for your phone it sees into walls

-- Regards Rob

View John_H's profile

John_H

176 posts in 1825 days


#6 posted 01-30-2018 06:36 AM

I agree with Jerry

Once you pull the existing cabinet, the wall is not going to have very much support. And if you look at how ‘accurate’ most framers frame anything (plumb, square, etc) you would probably be better off without it.

So are you thinking about an island with doors that open on both sides or what? You could probably get the electrical and the plumbing pretty close in the same area (vertically) which may save you some space, but your definitely going to have to build some sort of box or chase around it

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2633 posts in 1059 days


#7 posted 01-30-2018 01:36 PM

I’m not sure what the issue here is. If you plan on making a larger island that will surpass the footprint of the existing, the wall should be removed to make your life of installing the new island easier. The utilities that are running thru the existing wall can be accommodated inside your new island. I don’t see any advantage to retaining the half wall.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 710 days


#8 posted 01-30-2018 03:11 PM



Carloz—I ve been remodeling houses for about 40 years. I can t literally see inside that wall, but what I would expect to find are 2×4 studs on 16” centers, with plumbing and wiring through and between them. The island cabinets are giving more “sturdiness” to the wall than the wall is giving to the cabinets.

The wall is mostly a chase for the utilities and a surface for the drywall. You can remove it, but you ll still need a place for the plumbing and wiring. If you want to change the drywall to something else—or move the plumbing lines, you can certainly remove the wall and start fresh. But you won t gain much extra space by removing the wall—- the pipes and wires have to be somewhere. The answer really depends on what you want to end up with.

- jerryminer


Thanks Jerry,
That was the exact answer I was looking for from someone who has experience with this stuff.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com